I need help from a brilliant furniture designer!

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http://www.frontiernet.net/~toller/cabinet.jpg
I made it exactly how the customer wanted, to hold a lcd TV. Sadly, they measured the screen only, so the TV and stand will not fit in! She wants me to make the inside 2" higher. The top is a mitered; the bottom is butt jointed. I thought of sawing the bottom out and putting a new bottom below it but that would only gain 3/4". She is willing to pay for "repairs", but I can't think of anything that wouldn't look like repairs. Any ideas of anything that could be done that would look good? The project is butternut.
I suspect it is cheaper and easer just to start over, but would like to salvage it if I can.
I would like to put some walnut uprights in it, and hang the TV from the uprights (losing the stand . I think that would look great, but she doesn't.
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Toller wrote:

You could cut the top off about 2" or 3" down and biscuit joint it with a darker piece of 2" in between the top and lower body. This will give a nice band going around the top.
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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the insert would have to be vertical also.
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Toller wrote:

Got any dark walnut? this wouldn't matter about the grain going opposite directions as it will look ok.
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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between two pieces of vertical grain butternut it should crack when the wood moves. But maybe you meant something else...
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So why can't you put a stripe of vertical-grain walnut in the vertical-grain section, and horizontal grain for the back? It might take some careful planning to cut the top off your finished piece and glue up a chunk of walnut, but if you glued up a piece that was 6" high x (depth of workpiece) long, you could then cut that down to two 3" high pieces. I think a 2-3" stripe of walnut could look really nice, especially if the base were walnut also. I love the contrast of butternut and walnut - obviously different colors, but very similar grain patterns and there's a similar "warmth" or "value" or "tone" or something between the 2 colors. (As you can see, I don't know the real words to describe the various aspects of colors, but do you know what I mean?) Good luck, and let us know what works, Andy
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Toller wrote:

How do you mean *Crack* ?
If you where to biscuit joint the new walnut section all round it shouldn't have any adverse effects on the wood.
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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The butternut will want to move about a quarter of an inch (16" times .2"/foot) from summer to winter. The walnut will not move at all. That movement cannot be contained in the joint, which will crack to accomodate it.
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Use the same butternut oriented the same way; stain it darker or bleach it lighter or use maple for a contrasting band. Some variation of the theme is likely your best bet though.
--
"New Wave" Dave In Houston



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moulding around it? Maybe use a small chunk of moulding and slide it up and down the case till you find the spot that looks best and cut it there? Maybe if you could post a pic of it others may have better solutions for you. Jim
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Cut the bottom off and fit a thicker bit of walnut to the base to get the 2". You could do a sliding dovetail joint or a dado.
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
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Build a large fire, toss it in. Problem solved.

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Toller wrote:

Here's another ;-)
Cut a recess inside the bottom resting panel were the TV would sit and if possible a support ledge in the recess for the TV stand to sit on.
Or do you think she might not like that?
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

Forget that it won't work. :-(
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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Cut it in half with a bandsaw, add 3" piece with grain running same direction. Rout a recess at the two seams and add a banding strip.Does the TV have enough ventalation?
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Orrrr, instead of a banding strip, a nice piece of custom molding in a matching or contrasting color, depending on the customer's wishes.
--Jim

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If this was my project, I bet they would think losing the stand would be OK if I told them how much it would be to "fix" it. My first thought before reading your last paragraph was to attach to the VESA mounts that I assume are there to hold the TV.
todd
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If the OA depth increase would be excessive then you could remove a corresponding width from the existing box on the TS. Also, on the box stand base unit, why are you showing the butt ends.? Is there a reson for that?
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You noticed that.... The side pieces have vertical grain , while the front piece has horizontal grain; I didn't think the 6" joint was long enough for wood movement to matter, especially since they are connected with pocket screws. Since the front piece would show end grain I figured I would put the front piece between the side pieces, since they wouldn't be end grain. I didn't think the perpendicular grain would be as conspicuous as it actually is.
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"Toller" wrote...

I wouldn't worry about that; call it a design feature.
I can think of a few fixes for your cabinet:
1st & easiest, why not cut out the bottom and drop it the full 2" that's needed? You could suport the bottom with cleats attached to the base. That is, if the TV base is small enough to fit into the cabinet base.
2nd & do-able, but will alter the look a bit; knock the cabinet apart, cut off the miters, and a little more on the top, and add a block that will connect the top to the sides. You could radius the exposed corner, of make it from a contrasting wood.
3rdly, you might just have to make a new cabinet. At least it's a fairly simply design.
You could offer the three options to the client and level with her; option one you'll do for free, option 2 will cost a little extra for the repair, and option 3 there's no way you can charge for another entire cabinet so you'll lose your shirt. Or, if you think option one will work and the TV base will fit into a dropped cabinet bottom in the base, tell her you've solved the problem, and it will actually look better because it will hide the base, and all you'll see is the tv screen in the cabinet.
Good luck, hope this helps. And next time, get the spec sheet for the tv before you build! >8^)
-- Timothy Juvenal www.tjwoodworking.com
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