I cannot believe how much wood costs

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And please help me with this dimension question.
the shed I am building is 12' wide 16' deep.
Here is what I have for materials just for the floor all Pressure treated:
Item Price Quantity Total
6x6 $ 30.00 2 $ 60.00
2x8x12 $ 9.97 14 $ 139.58
2x8x16 $ 13.39 2 $ 26.78
4x8x3/4 $ 28.00 6 $ 168.00
I am guessingon the 2x8x12 at 14 pieces because they are supposed to be every 16'' on center. I took 12x16 and got 192 and divided this by 16 and of course got 12. I then put two rim joists on and got 14. Is this right?
The plywood is the killer. They way I look at it, since the shed is 12 feet wide and since I nail it perpindicular to the joists, then I need three 4x8x3/4'' for one half (three pieces) and three more for the other half of the shed floor. Is this right?
This is a total of $394.36. An enormous price for just the floor. The floor appears to be the most expensive part. All the 2x4s for the rest (whitewood, not pressure treated okay I guess) are from 2.39 - 5.35.
Please tell me I did the floor measurements wrong and things really don't cost this much (hopefully not more!)
Thanks as always.
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Sounds about right to me...6 pieces, yep. Someday, it'll all be over....
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feet
of
I am just about ready to buy the prefab shed at HD.
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you're funny!
dave
jm wrote:

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I think I am going to get the cheap metal shed.

treated:
and
right?
feet
of
don't
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Put this into perspective. You will have a weather tight structure for about $2 a square foot. Compare that to the other weather tight structure that you own.
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Oups...Maybe $5 a square foot...

structure
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LOL ... still a helluva bargain.
--
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Last update: 8/24/03
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says...

Sounds about right. That is one of the reasons that I went with a poured concrete floor for my 10x12. The other reason was because I didn't want to build a ramp or step up that much to get into the shed. The concrete floor cost me about $250-$300 total, which includes the concrete, wood concrete forms, stakes, rebar, gravel, rental on a couple of floats, and 2 cases of beer. The beer was payment to a couple friends for the help and was paid AFTER the job was done.
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You got screwed on that slab. Sixty 60# bags makes 120 sq. ft. at 4"thick.You dd the multiplication. Forms? Come on, that is scrap wood. Float rental? Puhleeze, skreet it off with a crowned 24 and then polish it with a home-made wooden trowel if you must. Radius tool cost $6.
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You obviously forgot to figure in the 2 cases of beer that he bought also.
You got screwed on that slab. Sixty 60# bags makes 120 sq. ft. at 4"thick.You dd the multiplication. Forms? Come on, that is scrap wood. Float rental? Puhleeze, skreet it off with a crowned 24 and then polish it with a home-made wooden trowel if you must. Radius tool cost $6.
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"You obviously forgot to figure in the 2 cases of beer that he bought also."
OOPS!!! I humbly stand corrected. In fact, the correct figure would be moe like sixty-four bags, but let's make it seventy in case the sand is not leveled rght in the forms. Pour the rest down the storm sewer.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net says...

LOL, better question, did YOU do the math? If you use 60lb bags it would take 80 bags for a 120sq.ft.x4"thick slab. However, who said anything about 4" thick? Did I mention using bags? Nope, seems like your assuming alot based on the way you would pour a basic patio slab.
The rental was for a bull float and an extra trowel for a total of about 10 bucks or so. And yes I did screed across with a 2x4, then used the bull float, then finished it with a steel trowel. I did buy an edger for about 6 bucks too because I didn't remember seeing the one I already had with the other tools. As for the forms your exactly right, except if you don't have scrap wood then you have to buy some, in my case it was 2x6's and a couple of 2x4's for the "patio" front step. The reason for the 2x6's was because of the integral footings that I used/and surface ground level. Next thing, when was the last time you priced 1/2" rebar? that stuff is a tad expensive when you opt for using all rebar and not wire mesh. Btw, I used 2.5 yards of concrete that I had delivered, figure that out.
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Around here, if you opted for the concrete floor, you would have to add in the cost of drawing up the plans and the building permit for the shed. The wood floor would be MUCH cheaper.

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jm wrote, wondering if this is really what he meant?

Why not build it up off the ground and use so called white wood or pour a concrete floor?
Rich
--
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but you can't make them THINK.
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treated:
and
don't
If the floor is touching the ground, then I can't use the whitewood, I thought. What about gravel? Another person mentioned that to me. When exactly must I have PT wood? 2x4s are 2.53 - 5.35 apiece depending on the length (non PT). Much cheaper.
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When you want it to last. If you are in the desert, white wood can last many years. In a damp climate, I'd use PT or concrete. Even if the floor is off the ground by a few inches, it is subject to a lot of exposure to moisture and you can't get under there to paint it.
My original deck was put in by the builder. It was repaired after 4 years, replaced after 8. Ed
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jm wrote, wondering if this is really what he meant?

There's a couple of different ways. 1. you could pour a footer and lay one course of cinder block then frame your shed with common lumber. One foot of air circulating under floor. 2. frame the floor off the ground using posts in concrete or anchors. Like a free standing deck. Air again circulating under floor. 3. Concrete pad, only using PT lumber around the perimeter, (sill plate, 2x6 ) attached with anchors embedded in the concrete when it's poured. Then just frame the floor with common lumber.
Rich
--
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No wood floor at all. Concrete pad with PT plates anchored to concete. May be able to eliminate the ramp this way, too. Build the bigger shed, you will never be sorry.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (RM MS) writes:

Depending on the conditions one can also live with no extra floor at all, just walls and a roof. I've seen a garage constructed this way (with round "beams", since they were cheaper than rectangular ones at the same strength) used for 20 years (10 years as a garage, 10 years as general garden shed, firewood storage, playground), then upgraded with an inner shell, some insulation and a wooden floor to a very nice workshop, now used since another 20 years ando showing no sgns of degradation; and *not* in a desert but in the at times rather humid climate of germany. The ground is rather hard loam.
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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