How to stain red oak to look slightly yellow


I have added cabinets to our kitchen using red oak, the exsiting cabinets also made from red oak appear to have been finished "natural" but have a slightly yellow look, and there is not much contrast of the grain... very good looking finish. My cabinets however look like oak, lots of grain, lots of contrast and more on the red, orange side...
Any suggestions would be appriciated...
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Disagree the dye, prefer pigment for more consistent and predictable results. The chemicals which color your oak differently will also react differently to chemical dying. Laying tiny pieces of pigmented stuff on the surface will increase the amount of yellow returning to your eye, guaranteed.
Your old cabinets have been bleached by their environment, I would assume, and are lighter as a consequence.
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results. The chemicals which color your oak differently will also react differently to chemical dying. Laying tiny pieces of pigmented stuff on the surface will increase the amount of yellow returning to your eye, guaranteed.
Your old cabinets have been bleached by their environment, I would assume, and are lighter as a consequence.[/quote
Thanks for your input George, can suggest a type/brand/color of pigment you're talking... never tried this before...
Thanks again.
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An oil stain is pigment suspended in the oil vehicle. Any brand at the local Borg with a swatch that looks close is the one to try. Easiest to find is probably Minwax stain - golden oak. Commercial cabinets were probably stained to equalize anyway.
As Paul R used to say, experiment on scrap rather than your project.
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George wrote:

Minwax Golden Oak is a dye stain, containing no pigment.
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So what's that stuff on the bottom that I have to stir?
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George wrote:

There wasn't anything to stir in the Golden Oak I've used.
Maybe I'm getting fresher product?
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snipped-for-privacy@spam.invalid (scottsignmart) wrote in

I read what the other fellows said, and don't necessarily agree.
Red oak turns 'golden' when oiled, or shellaced or varnished. I don't know the exact chemical or physical reasons, but there is a marked change.
Take some of your scrap, and try out a few of the uncolored finishes on your shelf on various pieces, and see if you don't get close to what's on your cabinets.
Then come back and tell us what you found out.
Patriarch
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Patriarch wrote:

I'll make that two!
My entire house is red oak flooring, trim, and doors, installed and finished by me. It's a warm, rich, very gold color.
All of my flooring is simply (3) coats of McCloskey Gym Seal clear oil-based varnish. Most oil varnishes and varnish blends, including Waterlox Original, would give the same effect.
A light rub down, NOT a soaking, with boiled linseed oil (from any hardware or paint store) would add also add a golden color under other finishes.
Commercially made Red Oak cabinetry is very commonly rubbed with BLO, sealed with a sanding sealer and sprayed with lacquer.
I doubt stain is necessary.
Barry
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