How to remove a broken screw?

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I am working with white oak and brass hinges. The hinges came with #4 brass screws. When first installing the hinges I used steel screws. When attempting to replace the steel screws with the brass ones the second one broke. My question is how do I remove the broken piece of the screw? Thanks for any and all help.
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On 2/17/2012 12:01 PM, trvlnmny wrote:

Ask for EZ-Out at your favorite automotive (or other) store. See below
http://www.toolprice.com/category/screwextractors /
My success with them has been mixed. I've never tried one on a brass screw, but it seems like it should work. HTH, Bill
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Bill wrote:

EZ-out is made for screws with stripped heads, not for broken ones AFAIK.
Somewhere I saw a device like a mini- hole saw. You cut a plug out with the broken screw in the center, then plug the hole and go from there.
--
Gerald Ross

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Gerald Ross wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)°01DSZ3AA&linkCode=asn
This one is from Amazon and is called a 5/15" screw extractor.
--
Gerald Ross

Nine out of ten men who try camels
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I used the 1/4" version when I had a similar problem recently (though my problem was the defective steel screws).
Worked quite nicely, though I'm still a bit worried about having 3 of the screws going into end grain where I plugged the holes w/ dowels --- wouldn't be as worried 'cept that 2 of the holes are under 1 hinge half, leaving only 1 good screw for that part...
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If you had used a plug cutter to cut new plugs, you wouldn't have to use end grain. Just use a cutter bigger than the hole. Glue in, and relax. That's kind of why a golf and brake line make sense.
Of go to a hobby supply and get some tubing. Pick out some tubing that fits into each other. Then make your own. ABout $2...
On 2/17/2012 1:25 PM, William F. Adams ( snipped-for-privacy@aol.com) wrote:

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On Feb 17, 1:34 pm, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

I actually bought a plug cutter at the same time, but was too impatient to use it.
Neat idea 'bout the nesting tubing --- how do you get the plugs out of the larger size?
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

By pushing a piece of the next smaller size tubing through.
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You put teeth in the tubes and just cut holes. Make sure you file the tube a little on the inside to remove andy burs on the inside before cutting teeth.
Then chuck them in the drill or drill press and cut. Then band saw the plugs out. simple. you can also strengthen the tubes where they chuck by putting a larger tube over the smaller, cutting it to size for the chuck, and soldering it so it doesn't crush.
On 2/17/2012 9:52 PM, William F. Adams ( snipped-for-privacy@aol.com) wrote:

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On Fri, 17 Feb 2012 10:53:22 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

It's not like #3 brass screws are going to be structural or anything, KnowwhatImean,Vern?
-- The ultimate result of shielding men from folly is to fill the world with fools. -- Herbert Spencer
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On 2/17/2012 12:15 PM, Gerald Ross wrote:

Yes, that's for "quitters"! : )
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Then procede as Gerald stated
Bill H.

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If you have some steel brake line, or an old golf club cut them apart to make a tube that goes over the screw.
Take a triangular file and cut teeth on the ends of the tube.
Drill around the screw, take a screw driver and pry the plug out. Replace the plug... btw if you use a golf club you can make a larger tube for the replacement plug if you don't have plug cutters.
Next time put candle wax on your steel screw. Then a little more on your brass screw. It makes the world of difference.
On 2/17/2012 12:01 PM, trvlnmny wrote:

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On 02/17/2012 10:32 AM, tiredofspam wrote:

I have a new 2 iron that deserves to be of some use!
--
"Socialism is a philosophy of failure,the creed of ignorance, and the
gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery"
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Yes, but it must be straight, and by the sounds of it, you really don't like your two iron. I hope you didn't bend it around a tree 8>)
On 2/17/2012 3:05 PM, Doug Winterburn wrote:

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On 02/17/2012 01:32 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

No, no trees or drowning. When they misbehave, they go in the closet. Some have been there for quite some time. The closet is getting fairly full - especially putters...
--
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gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery"
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Wooden hockey sticks around here sometimes get turned into project wood. (They often break near the blade.) Maybe you could invest in a welder and do something useful with the putters. *g*
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On Fri, 17 Feb 2012 12:32:57 -0500, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

"I broke 80 yesterday. That's a lot of clubs to break but I had a good time".
-Henny Youngman

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On Fri, 17 Feb 2012 09:01:37 -0800 (PST), trvlnmny

I'm guessing that it's the brass screw which broke on the way in. If there's ny shank sticking out, try using a pair of needle nose vise grips to unscrew it. If not, use a 1/4 or 5/16" hollow drill to remove the screw piece and surrounding wood, then glue in a piece of 1/4" or 5/16" dowel. Allow to dry, cut flush, and redrill the pilot hole.

First, always use the proper pilot drill bit to prepare the hole. Second, use wax or screw lube any time a brass screw is used. That includes waxing the steel screw prior to inserting the waxed brass one.
-- The ultimate result of shielding men from folly is to fill the world with fools. -- Herbert Spencer
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We are talking wood and a tiny little #4. I think you need to drill tiny holes all around it and dig it out, then drill out a clean 1/4" or 3/8"hole and pound in a dowel and shavv it clean with a sharp chisel. Tip: to drill a hole in an exact location with an existing raggedy hole nearby, lay a small piece of wood over the site, clamped in-place and drill through that.
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