How to make a cutting board

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After having a doizen or so comercial cutting boards split and thrown into trash I want to make my own. Can someone give me guidance how to make it so it won't split, how to finish it, if it at all, etc. Most important for me is it shoiuld be very durable as I don't want to make it every month. I plan using maple to make it.
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Make sure the wood is thoroughly dry, straight, and flat. Then use a waterproof glue -- not merely water *resistant*. A urea-formaldehyde glue, such as DAP Weldwood Plastic Resin Glue, would be the best choice IMHO.
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

No, the first consideration for cutting board glues is whether or not it is safe to use in contact with food. I can find no cite that the glue above is FDA approved.
The glue most often reccomened is Titebond -II or -III.
D.
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Lyons) wrote:

I guess you should have looked a little harder. The technical bulletin listed at the manufacturer's web site specifically recommends it for use in cutting boards.
http://www.dap.com/docs/tech/00030201.pdf

Depends on who's doing the recommending...
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

If there is a cite for FDA approval in the bulletin, I can't find it.
D.
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Lyons) wrote:

One would assume that the manufacturer would not recomment the product for unapproved uses...
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On May 4, 11:18am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

As the guy who would be building the board, and my family and friends the one eating off of it, I'd be less than thrilled to read these words in the DAP Weldwood Plastic Resin Glue MSDS:
EFFECTS OF OVEREXPOSURE - INGESTION: May cause stomach and intestinal irritation, vomiting, diarrhea, sweating, weakness, and headache. Ingestion of over 1 gram/day of barium chloride (25 grams/day of product) may raise blood pressure and affect heart action.
The amount is someone would ingest from a cutting board would be minimal, but still, let's look for a safer alternative.
Gorilla Glue: Ingestion Product is not intended to be ingested or eaten.If this product is ingested,severe irritation of the gastrointestinal tract may occur,and should be treated symptomatically. Do not induce the patient or animal to vomit.Call a doctor,ambulance or seek veterinarian assistance immediately.
The word severe scares me. Keep looking.
Titebond II: INGESTION: No hazard expected in normal industrial use. Ingestion is not a likely route of exposure.
Hmmm. I guess Titebond is weaseling around on this one. I cook meals for small groups and the use of the product in a cutting board does make the exposure route much more likely. Keep looking.
Maybe the new and improved Titebond III? Nope. The most weaselly MSDS of them all. It states that ingestion is a route of entry, and that you should contact a poison control center immediately, but it has no information about the effects. It's also interesting to see that they put NO to skin contact as a route of entry, but it says it can cause skin irritation. From their promo literature we have this gem: "FDA approved for indirect food contact" What does that mean
Franklin's Hide Glue: INGESTION: Single dose oral toxicity is considered to be extremely low. No hazards expected from swallowing small amounts incidental to normal handling operations. Ingestion may cause gastrointestinal irritation.
If this is starting to make you nervous, take heart, the cutting board you are using now probably came from China where they're using the new lead-based glue-extender.
And there's hope: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071014193722.htm
I ran across a number of places where a particular glue was listed as either non-toxic...or maybe not. This site http://askville.amazon.com/wood-glue-diferent/AnswerViewer.do?requestId=790353 gave the plastic resin glue (urea formaldehyde) a non-toxic in its cured state rating. I think I'll take that and call it good and worry about some other stuff that will kill me.
R
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From the Titebond site regarding Titebond II
"is FDA approved for indirect food contact (cutting boards)"
http://www.titebond.com/IntroPageTB.ASP?UserType=1&ProdSel=ProductLineTB.asp?prodline=2?prodcat=1
Like many substances, once they cure, they are pretty safe.

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I know my knife skills are limited, but I can't quite figure out how they expect you to get the food to hover above the cutting board while you cut it. ;)

Right. And it's not like you're eating a handful of sawdust with each meal.
R
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General consensus is to use a tight grain wood that will not promote collection of food particles and oil in the ports. This would mean that Oak and similar woods are out. Maple, cherry and similar woods are in. Use a good water resistant glue. Also, if you are gluing up slabs, jig up your drill press to allow a couple of dowels to be driven through matching holes near each end (and center with larger boards). I helped our son make a cutting board using dowel reinforcement 15 to 18 years ago and it is still going strong. There are lots of cutting board finishes available, but a couple of coats of mineral oil every 6 months or so renews the look and provides a good food-friendly finish. I have even given older boards a light pass through the surface planer to clean up cuts and gougers.
The board the son and I made was laminated from several hardwoods including Walnut, Cherry, and evil woods like Oak and Ash. Mom's been using it for years and we are still alive; but thorough cleaning and sealing are good.
RonB
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wrote:
IMHO, if "food safe" is that important, drill the suckers for through bolts and just worry about rust..
I'd worry more about the bacteria and other goodies that grow in cutting boards than in the glue used.. YMWV

mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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Nice - way to rain on the "sky is falling" parade. It's killjoys like you that insert pragmatism and rational thinking into such threads that take all the fun out of scaring the poop out of people. ;)
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Not to worry, there will be more opportunities...many more :)
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boards
As well, I've read that bacteria analysis in wooden cutting boards compared to plastic type cutting boards, shows fewer bacteria. It's proposed that the oils and such in wood inhibit the growth of bacteria more than the surfaces of plastic products.
Of course, in any scenario it's prudent to clean cutting boards of any type after use. There's nothing I hate worse than bit's of left over chili peppers getting mixed into my chopped up strawberries.
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The best science I have heard says the sharp edges of the wood fibers rupture the cell walls of the bacteria as a natural defense mechanism. Just like placing wood ash on the ground where slugs\snails crawl and it shreds the little bastards.

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That's referring to the *unmixed* *uncured* glue. Once mixed and cured, the stuff is insoluble in water.
[snip]

Like I said...
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On Mon, 04 May 2009 13:14:34 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Use "quater sawn" maple. Drill through the full width of the board and insert staimless steel "tension members, nutted tightly with the ends of the holes filled with dowels. You could also use some T88 epoxy or equivalent on the joints between the bords if you want "belt and suspenders" Finish with vegetable oil
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Best to finish in Mineral oil. Buy it at the pharmacy. Vege might depending on the brand go rancid or otherwise bad.
Martin
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

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I disagree. I know more about cooking than woodworking. Yes, traditionally, butcher blocks are treated with Mineral oil. Do you want to use a "petroleum" product around your food? I don't.
I never used any oil on my 10"X10" cutting board for 12 yrs! Yes, it finally split and I discarded it. Hey!! That's 12 yrs. I think I can afford it. You wanna invest in a 3'x3'x3' butcher block, ok. Use some mineral oil, if you want. I'm not putting Shell oil in my bod. Jes my opinion. ;)
nb
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wrote:

Pharmaceutical grade, it is even used as a laxative. Perfectly safe.
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