How to buy a used forklift ?

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SteveB wrote:

The Army gave me a 4,400lb capacity rough terrain forklift and a license after 1/2 hour of instruction. Then I used it to move missile sections around. On snow and ice in Germany. Didn't seem too hard to me.
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I would guess that there's a big difference between using a forklift outside (which is what I assume a rough terrain forklift is used for) and running one inside a warehouse. I've seen plenty of walls with forklift-shaped holes in them and warehouse racks with forklift-shaped dents in them. It wouldn't take a lot of imagination to envision taking out a rack with enough force to topple it. Not to mention the risks when picking or placing pallets to prevent knocking other pallets off the other side, etc..
Reminds me of a time several years ago when I worked as a design engineer. I borrowed a stand-up forklift from the shipping department to move some lead weights in our test yard that we used to provide dead weight to test our products over time. While bringing it back, I had to go through the employee parking lot. I guess I had a brain cramp and turned the little crankwheel the wrong way and turned left instead of right. I came about an inch away from taking out the rear quarter panel of somebody's car.
todd
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todd wrote:

Your point is well taken. In my brushes with forklifts, I always had all the time in the world to do the job. I used load binders when in doubt and had a second pair of eyes watching. Zipping around in a tight warehouse while the boss watches the clock would be a big step up in skill.
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On Tue, 03 Feb 2004 08:31:15 -0800, the renowned Jim Stewart

There are personal injury lawyers who specialize in forklift injuries.. probably in every major city of North America.
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
snipped-for-privacy@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
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outside
running
It
enough
In the convention industry, we use nine foot aisles. Then you have crates in those aisles, and at some times, you have just enough room to drive through an aisle, with only inches on each side, carrying crates that weigh 1,000# or more.. With a wide load, you must raise it about ten feet to clear adjacent exhibits. Many times, you must raise it to make a corner. Then you have to contend with garbage, stupid exhibitors, corners, cleaning people, other lifts, signage, and all manner of things. It has all the characteristics of a beehive.
We use portable aluminum ramps to unload box trailers. We unload up to 100 flats a day. We unload all types of private vehicles.
It gets pretty interesting at times. And it does require a high level of skills. Anyone who has been to a tradeshow installation can tell you it is a chaotic ballet.
Operating a lift in the open, with no one around, or in a quiet warehouse with few people would be infinitely easier.
Steve
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SteveB wrote: (clip) Anyone who has been to a tradeshow installation can tell you it is a chaotic ballet. (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^ Yeah, I've been there. I imagine if you damaged someone's exhibit just prior to opening time, there would be a lot of unhappy people.
In the warehouse where I used to work, when a newbie tried driving a forklift, everyone would gather at a safe distance and make wisecracks--waiting for the inevitable mistakes to happen.
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At HomeBuilders a couple of weeks ago, a huge overhead stage truss assembly hit the deck when a forklift operator went to tweaking the legs with his forklift. It was bad, but no one was hurt.
Steve
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Hey Steve,
What hall are you at??
Pedro
wrote

forklift-shaped
weigh
cleaning
100
is
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wrote

them.
with
placing
crates
corner.
of
warehouse
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test
Jim Stewart wrote:

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test
Jim Stewart wrote:

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SteveB wrote:

--

That depends on the lease. Most are strictly finace leases and have no
service allowances in them. Toyota has some good rates right now though.
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AL wrote:

Sounds about right. A brand new 3000 lb model will run about $17,500. they do not depreciate like a car due to model years, but hours is a more important factor.

Toyota is the top selling brand in the world. Most brands have components from around the world. Yale, as US brand uses Mitsubishi engines while Toyota is built in Ohio. I don't know of any brands to avoid. Just be sure the brand is still in busness, otherwise it will be hard to get parts if needed.

Electric is quiet and has no air pollution. Batteries and chargers are a few thousand dollars though. Unless you need electric, propane is a much better fuel. If it is used outdoors, gasoline is OK.

Engine hours are important. less than 10,000 is good. Look for signs of hydraulic leaks and see how the transmission feels. Steering should be fairly tight.

Side shift is a good feature if you are stacking pallets in tight quarters or need any degree of accuracy when placing a load. It moves parallel to your shoulders about 6 inches in each direction.

Yes, they are charged indoors. I don't know about the other factors.

Yes, they are made for most any smooth surface. Do NOT take them out on sand, gravel or dirt. Every year we get a new fork lift operator and we have to pull him out of the dirt outside the plant. The are very poor traction if the suface is wet. Downright dangerous in fact.

No, can sit for very long time.

Yes. Some of the new models have a fork leveling button. When travelling with a load you should have the forks tilted back. When you want to put it down, it can be difficult to get the forks exactly level. You hold the button on the lever and push forward and when the forks are 90 degrees, it will stop. You have to tilt the forks forward to pick up a load that is not on a pallet or to slide out from under a bundle.

Most dealers offer a safety course. OSHA requires a training course. You have to have a refresher every couple of years and you have to be trained in every model. You are supposed to run down a checklist every day before using it also. And now you are supposed to wear a seatbelt. -- Backup alarms are not required yet, but if you have more than one truck and one has the alarm, all must then have the alarm.
If you think buying a car is a fun time, forklift salesmen make them look like amateurs.
Other factors to consider are lift heights. The trucks in a trucking termnal are often single mast as they only lift pallets maybe 4 feet to stack inside of a trailer. Double mast allows a much higher lift; this is very common to find. Triple mast is higher yet. I'm not sure of the maximum, but the ones I just bought are 186" This is handy when you have to change lightbulbs in a factory ceiling or do overhead piping. You can buy a cage that goes on the forks to lift a man up.
For limited use, the "window" in the front is probably not the deciding factor, but if you use one a lot, it is a big help to have a wide window in the mast instead of looking at the cylinder. Makes for safer driving and more accurate load placement. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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A safer way to drive is backwards, where you will have a full view.
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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Mark and Kim Smith wrote:

Yes, but it makes picking up a pallet in a trailer difficult when you enter backwards.
If the load obscures your vision, it is required that you move backwards. or going down a ramp or incline.
--
Ed
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I'm sorry I can't help you out with details on forklifts (ask me about tractors though :-)) However, you might also want to check out the site: <http://www.yesterdaystractors.com/ , they have a classified and photo classified section and often have a forklift or two for sale. It will give you at least another place to look.
No affiliation, just spend some time looking at the hardware.
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wrote:

More of a tip than anything:
When you pull up to a stoplight allow plenty of room between you and the new Lexus in front of you for the forks - those taillights are damned expensive, DAMHIKT.
--
Owen Lowe and his Fly-by-Night Copper Company
Offering a shim for the Porter-Cable 557 type 2 fence design.
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I don't drive Forklift though someday it might be a good idea to get licensed. For the training/license I confirm with everyone else. Usually it is offered by local colleges or tech centers. In NY(the state) it is offered by BOCES on a regular basis.
--


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snipped-for-privacy@juno.com says...

Humorous aside, where I grew up, BOCES was the special education service offered by the school district for students with "special needs".
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It still is. But it is also know for its continuing education classes for those either looking to get better or change trades.
--


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