How long will my table saw blade last?

I've got a carbide blade that came with my saw - I don't use it heavily currently - at most I'll crosscut some 2x4's, and sometimes some plywood. How much cutting can a typical blade take before it needs replacing?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ben Siders asks:

From your description, you'll need to sharpen it every couple of years, but every blade is different...including ones within the same brand and model, though the groupings on good ones are very tight.
A lot also depends on what you're cutting...wood is simple to figure, but laminate is rough on saw blades.
Some users might get a couple weeks out of a top grade, well sharpened, circular saw blades. Others may get three years from the same blade, under different cutting circumstances.
You're asking about the blade that came with your saw. Usually these are inferior in quality (sometimes to almost anything), but I've gotten some good ones on Ryobi table saws, among others.
Charlie Self
"Men willingly believe what they wish." Julius Caesar, De Bello Gallico
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Assuming you don't hit anything like a nail, stay with softwood/plywood; keep the light use; avoid the knots and you clean the blade often, I'd say you can pretty much forget about the blade until 2005...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hm... some 2x4's and sometimes plywood. At that rate, it should last a long time and do a lot of cutting. After a while it will get dull however.
Hope that helps!
-Jack
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The blades that come with saw are cheap to mediocre. I have a Craftsman blade that came with the saw that will last for about 50+ years because it cuts like crap and is only used for rough cutting wood that needs no dimensional tolerances at all and finish is not critical. Saw has since gone and I gave it away with a blade I'd rate is C-
I have a blade that came with my Delta saw that is OK for ripping, mediocre for cross cutting and will last probably 3 years or more as I do use it for ripping some stock. The finish is OK. I'd rate it B+
My Freud Diablo blade gets the most use. It is designed for cross cutting and gives an excellent finish. I use it for ripping at times and it does well even though it is not the primary design. After almost three years of moderate use it is ready for sharpening. I'd rate it at least an A
I'd expect to get that much use from a Forrest blade also. The WWII may be the next one when I do buy.
FWIW, one nail will change the above result drastically. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I used my new WWII on some cement board that needed cutten and it didnt hardly last at all!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Until it gets dull.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The blade that came with the saw was equivalent to the ones they sell for $10 or $20. I don't know the tooth count, but it is maybe 40 and a combination blade. Yours sound like a better quality and design. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Like most here, I do not have a good answer to your question. But, - when you no longer are satisfied with the way it cuts, remember there is such a thing as the relatively cheap, single sided diamond files, - one such at 1/2"x3" will probably set you back less than 10 dollars, but it will work wonders on a tired blade with very little effort.
Bjarte
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There are too many factors to give a specific time. The only sure way is the quality of the cut.
Rip a scrap piece of plywood now, while the blade is new. Mark a date on it, hang or it or nail it to the wall, then use it down the road to as a check against the quality of the cut.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/24/03
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ben Siders wrote:

Dunno. I used the blade that came with my table saw for five years before I replaced it. Ultimately, a nail decided things for me. I hit a nail and big, jagged chunks broke off of several of the teeth. That was that.
Now that I have a relatively good blade on the saw, the performance difference is dramatic. How much of this is due to my old blade being dull, and how much due to the alignment job I did on the saw when I changed blades is something I'll never really know.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.