How do I make this shaker foot design?

I would like to make a shaker chest that has a foot design that looks like the one on this chest http://www.weaverfurnituresales.com/Shaker-Hill-Dresser-with-Mirror.aspx I like the way it flairs out at the bottom. I have no idea what the foot design is called, so I am not sure what to search for on google or youtube. If anyone could point me to a directions on the techniques for make this type of foot I would be grateful.
Thanks, Bill
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The New Yankee Workshop web site has videos that you can view online. They've had several episodes where they're made similar feet.
R
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It looks to me like you want to start a 1.5 x 1.5" 3foot leg with a length of 2x4 stock that's 3.5 feet long, and bandsaw it in half with a foot-shaped deviation at the ends of the cut. The exterior surfaces of the feet would best be fine-shaped with something like a spokeshave. You'd want to shave from the end to the center on the exterior surface, from center to end on the interior.
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"billreed63" wrote in message
It appears to simply flare out parallel to the front of the chest.
Cut the inside wedge off, glue that inside wedge back on to the other side.
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On 5/14/2011 12:56 PM, billreed63 wrote:

1. Make a full size, to scale, master template of one leg of your project chest, complete with your desired flair.
(1/2" mdf is excellent material for this master template/pattern ... this template should be precisely dimensioned, but thinner, version of your finished leg)
2. On four boards of your project stock, boards that are WIDE enough to accommodate the complete flair, use the template to trace out each leg in pencil.
(orient the template so as to pay particular attention to the grain pattern at the flair so that you don't end up with a weakness due to grain direction at the beginning of the flair)
3. Using a band or jig saw, rough cut (about an 1/8" outside the penciled leg outline) an outline of each leg.
4. Attach the master template/pattern (either screwing in locations that will be hidden, or using double sided tape) to one of your rough cut project legs.
5. Using a router "pattern bit" (table mounted router is preferable), and with the router following your master template, route the 1/8" excess away.
You should now have one complete, precisely dimensioned, flaired leg for your chest.
Rinse, repeat.
Although the following is a chair leg instead of your chest leg, the principle is exactly the same
(just think of the chair leg as your desired flaired leg, albeit with two extra long "flairs" instead of one):
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/CrftsManCh3.JPG
This picture should bring the above method into focus for you ... if not shout back with any questions.
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On 5/14/2011 3:42 PM, Swingman wrote:

To remove any confusion, there are three "master templates/patterns" in the above picture ... two of them are spares.
I always make a couple of spares of the finalized leg template, either for future projects, or in case Murphy strikes and ruins the original ... not a bad practice.
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"Swingman" wrote:

Do you do anything to protect your templates (1/2 " mdf or even 1/4" hardboard)?
I have found that a couple coats of 1 lb shellac does wonders to protect mine.
Lew
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Yep ... That works real well. My problem is finding a place to store the things as almost every project has at least one.
(and, since I'm moving the shop back to the old building, I will even have less room ... hard thing, moving back into a smaller space, although it will balance itself by having the shop back on premises.)
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flooding problem?
Good thing you don't live near the Mississippi river! I understand that they have a little water problem just now.
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Michaels" says...

They really should just accept that they're on a flood plain and build accordingly, like the Egyptians did.
Funny that they could figure it out four thousand years ago but we can't and instead try to prevent the floods.
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"J. Clarke" wrote in message
I don't think it is a matter of not knowing that the area will flood and or how to prevent it so much as it is less expensive to build at ground level and buy government backed flood insurance. If the government would quit trying to protect every one from their own stupidity I think we would become a smarter and more self sufficient society.
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"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:

Subsidence in the general area was the problem with old shop. The shop building was built on a slab on grade in the forties. Since then, adjacent construction, genius "flood control" engineering using streets to carry rain water with no downstream provisions, and lack of permeable soil due to 'paving paradise', had caused the building to start taking in water during heavy rains.
About a year and a half ago I did a general remodel of the building, added an average 3 1/2" of height and leveled the slab, added a cofferdam of sorts, and generally improved drainage away from the building, which will hopefully buy a few more years of dry use ... another tropical storm like Allison in 2001 will tell the tale ... my home, on the same lot, is 3' above grade.
Anyhow, I'm looking forward to having a shop 'out the back door' again, albeit about 25% smaller then the current. Thus I'm trying the Euro approach to storage and use of space. We'll see ....
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"Swingman" wrote in message
Snip
Thus I'm trying the Euro approach to storage and use of space. We'll see ....
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On 5/16/2011 5:59 AM, Leon wrote:

While it doesn't fall in the storage category, it does look interesting. Actually, the price is very reasonable if the quality is there.
Wanna help me move it in?? ;)
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