Hinge mortising jig

Hi,
I'm searching a jig to route the hinge mortises on my doors, I've found Bosch 83038.
I know Leevalley used to have one but they don't anymore, anyone have suggestions.
Thanks.
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I picked up a $25 jig at the borg and it worked fine for six doors. Made a story board and -- surprised the hell out of myself -- everything fit perfectly.
SevYA wrote:

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SevYA wrote:

I make them from hardboard and a strip to register on the edge of the door.
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B A R R Y;1513972 Wrote: > SevYA wrote:-

>

> door. I dont have the exact model but I know HITACHI Power tools have it. I remember my dad using it.
--
albeerr


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16, issue # 94. If you decide to make your own, I could fax the plan to you assuming you don't subscribe to that magazine.
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You appear to be talking about interior doors, no cabinet doors.
That leaves you with Bosch or Porter Cable.
PC has been the king of that market for quite a while..
http://www.coastaltool.com/a/accessories/door_acc.htm http://www.coastaltool.com/a/port/59381.htm
and Stanley also does that sort of stuff and can be found at Lowes or Home Depot.
SevYA wrote:

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On Wed, 04 Feb 2009 20:56:17 GMT, "SevYA"

We use the Milwaukee model but they are all about the same. If you only have a few doors and this is a one time deal it might be cheaper to make your own or buy a single butt template.
The big advantage to the factory models is that they are adjustable for just about any door thickness/ height and most hinge sizes. Of course you can always use it and sell it when you're finished.
Mike O.
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I like the way Mike thinks! We have and use the Porter-Cable 59381 that Pat posted a link for, and it works very well. But if I were just doing a few doors,(especially if they were all the same size), I'd consider making my own. (and would probably have enough time invested by the time I was done to have paid for the PC one) =0)
Lenny
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You been studying my methods again ???
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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On Thu, 05 Feb 2009 16:47:28 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I'm assuming that you're replacing your doors and dealing with existing jambs, if that is the case trying to use one of those put-together jigs can be difficult if not impossible...my PC kit sits in my shop, haven't used it in years. Reason is I rarely get new finish jobs anymore and I rely mostly on replacements. The jig(s) I use are Templaco (add .com) and very simple. You can get the 3 hinge version (which applies to new jambs and doors and works great and never needs adjustment) or the one hinge model...they come in all conventional sizes (3" to 4 1/2"). So I, and alot of the door replacement guys around here, use really only one jig for the appropriate-size hinge...you get your initial measurement to the top of the top hinge, mark and adjust for the router template guide, and make the cut, making sure that the setback from the edge of the door is identical to the jamb. Once this is done it's an easy process to hook and measure for the other hinge locations...moving the jig to each new marking (don't forget to adjust for the template guide!). AFA making your own, why not? If you have the time it seems reasonable...
cg
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Charlie Groh wrote:

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Charlie Groh wrote:

I don't replace doors for a living, so I'll illustrate my method, based on what Charlie posted.
- Trace the hinge on 1/4" hardboard - Cut the "jig" with a jigsaw. <G> - Brad nail or screw a wood fence to set the "set back". - Measure the top hinge and set the jig, holding it in place with carpet tape - Rout the mortise with a top bearing bit, as this makes the jigs much easier to make. - Move the pattern to the 2nd, 3rd, and if necessary, 4th mortise location
If you're using rounded corner hinges, use a bit that matches the corner radius.
Square edge hinges? Finish with a sharp chisel.
It's cake! as well as cheap...
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wrote:

...yup, this'll work! I'm not getting the top-bearing bit part, tho...wouldn't that be a hassle to get your depth right on? IMO, template guides are a great thing, just allow for the difference in your jig and you're off and running...I cut jigs all the time using my table saw almost exclusively...you can run over the corners and the template guide doesn't know! I use 1/4" stock too, but I have to grind the template guide down to 3/16" or so...1/4" melemine works great for these...
cg
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Charlie Groh wrote:

Not really. As long as some part of the bearing meets the template, it's fine. If the bit is too long, just use thick stock.

Same here... I was simplifying and kind of kidding around.
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I have one of these for euro style hinges.Not sure if this is what you want... http://www.veritastools.com/Products/Page.aspx?p 5

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