Heating a shop

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This shop is very well insulated AND I strung my Lektrikkul cables via a few palm trees to the house. Maybe another 50 bucks? If that?

I hate this crap, Luigi. Snow is snow. But this slush is breaking me down. Sarniapolis, across the river from Port Huron MI
Rome, Italy, 4154'N Sarnia, Ontario 4259'N You're at 60 N....Need I say more? You going to be getting daylight soon, huh?
00
Rob
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On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 12:46:06 -0500, Robatoy wrote:

It's really expensive at 10.5 cents per kWh. (Watch the Merkins groan)

Heh, heh! No slush here. But we did have a record snowfall in January & it keeps going. I've neve seen so much snow since I've been here. I'm getting tired of shoveling.

That is the subtropical part of Ontario. Don't you have southern trees like pin oaks, honey locusts, sassafras, growing in your part of the world.

Just a little more than that: 46' more, which is about 1/2 to 1 degree north of Oslo, Stockholm & Helsinki.

Ackshally, we get 4 hours of daylight or so in the depth of winter. But it's mostly sunny! Hardly any of the greay shit you probably get. Environment Canada even classifies Whitehorse among the cities in Canada with the most comfortable climate.
http://www.on.ec.gc.ca/weather/winners/comfy-e.html
--
Luigi
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[after some selective snipperization, we eded up with:]

Hey, that's pretty good, eh? They want to do a variable rate thing here in Ontario. The first xxx KWh for cheap, then it goes up as usage goes up. I have no idea where the numbers are going to land. I know I'm screwed. This monitor alone will take me over whatever threshold they set.

That surprised the shit outta me. Who'da thunk it?
0.1 degree C....snow in the morning, rain in the afternoon, ohhh gooody.
My neighbour gets more snow than I do. . . . . His lot is bigger.
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Rob I use one of those AND a baseboard unit. I keep the temp low (45-50) when I'm not in the shop and the 4800 watts can heat the space in a hurry. I use the baseboard unit to maintain the temp. The baseboard is just to slow when you want heat in a hurry.
I have a 10 foot ceiling so installed a fan to push the heat down as well.

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on 2/14/2005 11:10 AM David said the following:

Thanks to all who provided suggestions. After a bit of research I've opted for a unit specifically made for shop/garage use. The Dayton G73 heater is a 240/220V electric 5000w unit. It "seems" ideal for my needs.
The description claims four heat levels (but I suspect that may be two levels at either 240v or 220v<g>) Regardless, that capability plus a built-in thermostat with a range of 25-85 degrees should do the trick as the wattage is approximately 40% greater what I should need for that shop.
Nice too that it has a delayed fan setting so that once the element is turned off the fan continues until it cools down and is starting to blow cool air.
Unit should be delivered in the next couple days. I spent yesterday with hopefully my second to last day with the Kero-Sun unit installing the 30a circuit that it needs.
I'll let you all know what I think of it once I get it installed.
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You know what? That just may be the answer I have been looking for. I posted, some time back a request for an automatic selector switch so that my compressor wouldn't start if my heater was running. But a 1500 watt baseboard heater won't give me any grief. I have enough for that AND the compressor. And no fan.... And as long as I set the thermostats in such a way that the 4800 watt unit doesn't come on, except in the morning...
There it was... hiding in plain sight...
Thanks, David!
no wonder I keep coming back here...
00
Rob
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As you have already noted, I use sealed unit 240V electric baseboard units in my 16' by 24' shop. The units (two 1000 watt units) contains something similar to anti-freeze, not water, but I'm not sure that is significant. I built my shop with this system in mind, and my shop is very well insulated and sealed, plus double pane windows, insulated doors, etc. It is also important to note that I live in Colorado, a normally dry state with more than 300 days of sunshine per year. We do get some pretty cold days, but nothing like the Northern tier states, or even the Midwest. I work in my shop almost daily, and I wear a Tee-shirt. I keep the thermostat at 60 degrees, but with two south facing windows it is usually over 65 by mid morning. By noon I often open a window.
I can't compare what I have to convection electric baseboard heaters because I have never used them. These sealed units produce a steady heat with no drafts and my cost has been reasonable -- I really don't know what they cost to run, and at this point in my life, I don't care, but they are not that expensive. My initial cost for the two units and the thermostat was just a little over $300, but that was 12 years ago.
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Ken Vaughn
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Ken Vaughn wrote:

Thanks for responding Ken and, BTW, that's one nice shop you have and great website on which to showcase it.
I've found similar units (1000 watts each -- mfg by www.Cadetco.com) selling for ~ $127 each at Menard's Lumber. The hydroponic sealed units should function similarly to the standard electric resistance heat. In yours, however, the Calrod element is sealed within the copper vessel containing the mix of water and anti-freeze so the surface temperature, I think, will be somewhat less than the standard unit.
My concern, again, is that despite whatever promises I make to myself to clean up after each session of "sawdust creation" an accumulation could form in the heater and eventually ignite with totally unacceptable consequences.
The cost is not a problem in my situation as I'm used to electric heat bills and I won't be running it all the time. Like you, I have the double glazed windows which will be further upgraded (due to leakage of the glass) to Low-E double glazing this year.
In a perfect world I should have ~ 2,600 watts of heater in that shop. I'll likely round up to 3,000 if I go with the 1000 watt sealed units since they are fairly short units (ones on display look to be about 54" or so). Two of the conventional units at 1,500 watts each will cost me less than $50.
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