has live edge run its course

never really liked live edge but i see it all over the place
some like it some do not
years ago when i first saw live edge table i liked it but now i look and think it needs to be completed
there are some small number of pieces that can look nice with a live edge
some turnings can look pleasing
fad or for real and here to stay
it has been long for a fad
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On Friday, June 17, 2016 at 10:55:25 AM UTC-5, Electric Comet wrote:

and think it needs to be completed
What is there to be completed? I'm at a complete (sic) loss, as to what y ou mean by "it" not being complete.

So, now you're an expert on identifying what is a fad or not? Your pet ro ck must be getting lonely.
Should we (automatons), all, decorate our dwellings the same way?
One's personal/individual or group (family) preference is not a fad. My pe rspective for (sometimes) favoring a live edge design is in the realm of de corating, to a significant extent. Decorating a house, office, camp, cott age, bungalow, etc. is not a fad, though "tastes" can change over time. Y ou don't (necessarily) decorate a hunting camp or summer cottage the same a s your permanent home, office, etc.
Your approach to this whole matter, or why, is incomprehensible and ludicro us!
Sonny
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On 6/17/2016 12:35 PM, Sonny wrote:

Many people have no idea what live edge is let alone appreciate it. I was in a shop that had some turned bowls for sale and overheard someone ask "why don't they trim off the ugly edge?" They thought it was not complete.
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On 6/17/2016 8:58 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

A live edge not only helps make a piece look natural and unique it is like a certificate of authenticity. ;~)
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Myself being one of them. But, I do appreciate yer bringing it up and making folks aware of such a thing.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Live_edge
Lotta info on the web, natch. ;)
nb
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On Saturday, June 18, 2016 at 8:18:00 AM UTC-5, notbob wrote:

Hmmmm!? "... appreciate it." Appreciate what? "Aware of such." What is the awareness? Aware of what, exactly? If I may partially answer... it's a form of art, visual arts.
I may have a "weird" perspective, but since grade school, I've been a natur alist. My first major, in college, was Wildlife Boiology. Many ideas of design are rooted in nature's designs. I supsect there's some basic aesth etics, in natural designs, that people gravitate to, hence lending themselv es to having these elements within their home, offices, etc.
I don't always strive to have something of nature's design incorporated int o a project, but when I do, and when I suspect someone else does, also, the n, when we succeed in presenting that design, there's an even more apprecia tion of success, than otherwise.
The description, in the Wiki link, mentions the "style" being western and/o r rustic. To me, that's kind of generic. I tend to think of it more as back-to-basics, as for as design elements, re: Picasso, etal.
When a live edge piece has knots and other figured elements, then "we" see the surreal elements (surrealism art forms - re: Dali) in it.
Don't consider just the edge, being natural. Look at the whole project, t o see what ALL is there.... whether it's a table, a picture, a sculpture, a building, etc.
The task is not always to build a structure, but to create or reveal someth ing you can't simply touch. Often times, nature already has the elements. We just have to find them or stumble upon them, then use them. There's a reason why George Nakashima is famous for his woodwork, but Mother Nature deserves some of the credit, too.
Sonny
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On 6/18/2016 11:08 AM, Sonny wrote:

Hmm, you sound a bit defensive. While you consider yourself a naturist, others consider a live edge an ugly detraction. As I said, many people are unaware of such things. Check out the bowls at Bed Bath & Beyond or Kohs. You can go through life and never see a turning or table top with a live edge.
One more question. I just built a TV stand out of birds eye cherry. Do I need a primer if I paint it with latex+ plan to use a roller for a smooth finish.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

No - a primer is not necessary. Just apply additional coats of latex until you get a good build. Then knock it down with 80 grit and follow that with repeated rubbing down with a brown paper bag until you get the desired level of finish. Roller or foam pad will work, as will even a cheap brush. Might just take another brown paper bag or two to get to the desired finish.
Hope this helps...
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On Sat, 18 Jun 2016 18:41:11 -0400, Mike Marlow

Now you paint then apply the brown paper bag so it sticks right?
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Markem wrote:

That's if you want the decoupage finish...
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That's because neither robots or Chinese sweatshops make live-edge furniture. ;-) You'll often see it in artsy-craftsy sorts of stores and shows, though.

Any cherry needs red paint, at least six coats of latex, is preferred. Oh, wait, it birds eye may be black cherry.
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On Fri, 17 Jun 2016 21:58:11 -0400

i like the look of sharp lines created with tools or machines juxtaposed against the random patterns in the wood
i cannot recall ever seeing live edge furniture in a home
not even a man cave
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On Sat, 18 Jun 2016 14:10:13 -0700, Electric Comet

Perhaps your limited exposure, limits your vision.
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wrote:

I tend to see it in camps and log cabins, and rarely in "mid century modern" homes. ;-)
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I have seen a few in high end office space and conference rooms.
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wrote:

Yes, and doctor's offices. High-end being the key phrase. They're not mass produced in China so it tends to be expensive. It's not surprising that EC hasn't seen it anywhere. He can't even afford a shift key.
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SFMoma, which just had a grand opening of their new exhibit space, is building out a ground-floor restaurant; all the tables are live-edge.
It's very common in the shops in Monterey and Carmel to find live-edge redwood burl furniture.
I've a live-edge redwood burl coffee table.
Live-edge claro walnut slabs: http://www.bakerhardwoods.com/
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On 6/18/2016 4:52 PM, Markem wrote:

You don't see live edge on furniture from Ikea.
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wrote:

Live-edge particle board? Maybe someone should suggest it. ;-)
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