Grizzly shapers G1026 (3hp) vs G7214 (7.5hp)


I need a shaper but can't decide between the G1026 (3hp) and the G7214 (7.5hp, 3 phase). I can afford the smaller one right now but would have to save up for the bigger one. I do have 3 phase power. Usually when I pick the smaller of the two, I end up kicking myself. But sometimes, like with my contractor's saw, the smaller one ends up doing everything I want.
Comments?
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AL wrote:

Those two don't look to me to be sufficiently close together to be the either-or choices--the larger one is a real industrial machine whereas the other is a higher-end home-shop or smaller cabinet shop.
I'd have to know a lot more about the need to make a even half-baked recommendation owing to that substantial difference between the two.
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

(Other than the same general feeling as you describe of typically waiting until can get the "real deal" as opposed to scrimping, that is).
But, if you have production needs other than recreational, it may be worthwhile to go ahead. I can't imagine much you wouldn't be able to accomplish w/ the smaller one, just that the larger table and size and additional shaft speeds/capacities <might> be of some value at some point in time.
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It looks like the fence system on the 7 is much nicer with a micro adjust. It will also be a lot better if you are spinning really big cutters, not just because of the HP but also it can be run slower.
If you are planning on running big wing cutters, I'd finance the difference and get that sucker now. If you are just looking for a more powerful router, then the 10 will be more than enough.
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Can't comment about the bigger one, but I have the 1026 and except for the fence really like it. I replaced the fence with a modified version of Norm's router table fence and I'm alot happier. I hated the fine adjust feature. It was too hard to replicate fence settings and never worked very well. As for power I have run up to 5" panel raising bits in oak without a problem. The 1026 is a two speed machine. You change speeds by changing the belts. Low is low enough to run the aformentioned 5" monster and high does a decent job even with router bits. I have to say though unless you are doing alot of cabinet doors or other production type work, a router table might be a better choice, just because the bits are so much less expensive. I just spent $250 for the panel raiser with a stile and rail set. I could have gotten the same in router bits for between $100 to $150 dollars. I bought my shaper just as router tables were becoming popular and if I had it to do over again I would probably invest in a good 3 horse router and router table, just because I could have a lot bigger variety of bits for a lot less and since I'm not a production shop that makes more sense than the heavy duty capacity of the shaper. Don't get me wrong, I love the shaper. It does a beautiful job, and the cutters I have will last me a lifetime, but I think I would have spent the money better with the router table and more of an assortment of profile options. Hope that helps. If you have any specific questions about the 1026 just drop me a line. Happy sawdust, BC
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