Grizzly G5959Z cabinet saw, 12" 5HP

I am in process of setting up my new Grizzly saw and would like to confirm that my experience is matching the stories I have been reading in the internet. In summary, the price performance is excellent, but there are some quality issues. It is still too early to say, if any of those issues has any impact to the results you can get with the saw.
Purchasing: First I did try to purchase the saw directly from Grizzly. I did need a delivery to my home address and moving the heavy (over 600 lbs) box into my garage. After several e-mails and phone calls, I could not get a confirmation from Grizzly that they can arrange an inside delivery. The plan B was to make the order through Amazon with the expectations that I could include the inside delivery as part of the package.
The Amazon order did not work. With the upgraded security checking, Amazon was not able (or willing) to charge my credit card. After two failed attempts, I gave up. Time for plan C.
I made an order on Grizzly web site and gave an instruction to contact me before the delivery. Grizzly was very fast in booking the order and confirming the shipment. Once I did learn the shipping company contact information, I did call them and requested the in-house delivery. They said that it can not be done without an authorization from Grizzly. Once again, I contacted Grizzly and got the same answer; they can support only the standard delivery. Call back to the shipping company and discussions with 5 different people in 3 different cities, I finally got a confirmation that I can have the in-house delivery and they will bill me later.
Delivery: I was at work and SWMBO got a call from the truck driver that he didn't find our address. He didn't even have a local map. The instructions through phone didn't work. Solution: SWMBO and the truck driver agreed to meet at a local 7/11 (Wawa) and from there the truck followed SWMBO to our home.
Unloading: Everything was going quite well when the tailgate started to come down. Two feet's before the crate was on ground, the tailgate started to tilt under the heavy weight. And my dear saw fell down. The box was not very strong, but the tank like saw construction took the beating without any visible damages. My first concern was that the trunnion or table top alignments were harmed. Luckily the motor bracket and the styrofoam block kept everything in place.
Cleaning: WD40 was quite efficient in cleaning the table top and the wings. There were some paint like dirt that resisted my paper towels and repeated WD40 treatments. The dirt was not strong enough to fight against a sharp chisel.
Table top attachment: This was the first quality fault I did find in G5959Z. One of the M10-1.5 x 30 bolts was almost without threads. Another bolt had a "hole" at the top. The bolt with the hole is a design fault in this construction. I guess that the original G5959 had different measurements. When they changed the tilting from right to left, the table top attachment bolt is sharing the same coordinates with a rear rail attachment bolt. If the rail is in place you can not turn the table top bolt. My plan is to shorten the bolt by 1/4 inch.
Moving the saw to basement: My workshop is in basement and I did start to move the saw there in pieces. The table top and the wings were not too bad; I was able to move them by myself. For the cabinet, motor, and trunnion, I will need some help. I am planning to leave the base bolted on the shipment crate and either slide it or trolley it down the stairs. There should be one or two extra inches in the door opening for the crate.
The fence: I have not yet installed the fence, but it is heavy and looks very solid.
Electricity: Before I can really enjoy my new baby, I need to get 220 V in the basement. The electrician has promised that it should happen during this week.
If there will be any significant observations, I will share my experience in another posting.
Cheers, Ollie
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That's a great review so far, I'm looking forward to reading more.
Don

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On Wed, 12 May 2004 00:30:37 -0400, "Ollie"

Just ordered the 3HP left tilt. I'm having it delivered to work because we have a fork lift and I wont have to worry about time.I can borrow a truck and back up to my shop. Then I can gather some help to unload. I should have it by next friday. a friend is coming over this week to help install 220. At the same time I ordered a table saw package from woodpeckers. It has their new table saw fence with a wonder fence setup. If anyone is interested I will let you know. Darrell
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wrote:

Darrell, I hope that you will have quality time with your new buddy.
Now I am in process of moving the heavy monster (600 lbs - table top and the wings) down to basement staircase. First I need a plan that will not damage the people, house, and my beautiful green monster. Please share your experiences and ideas, how to move 350 lbs on narrow 45 degree slope for 12' through a door opening with a two inch clearing.
Cheers, Ollie
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Is that a slope with smooth surface or stair treads? Either way, I'd tie it off to something at the top and lower it down on a dolly or hand truck. You can rent furniture dollies. Using the winch to lower it, have someone behind the saw to guide it. Ed
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That sounds feasible. What could be the best method to get a furniture dolly underneath the 350 lbs crate?
++ Ollie
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    Greetings and Salutations... I am not a professional mover, but, have moved some pretty heavy things. Unless you are adventuresome, or experienced in moving heavy things around, you might want to seek professional help (and I do mean a rigger...not therapy *smile*).
    What ever you do, DO NOT HAVE ANYONE BELOW THE LOAD WHILE GOING DOWNSTAIRS!
On Sun, 16 May 2004 18:04:25 -0400, "Ollie"

to TILT up. A couple of not-very-large folks or one hefty boy should be able to do it handily. I would strongly recommend the hand truck (or appliance/stair truck, as it is known). The appliance/stair truck is a VERY heavy frame, with small wheels for rolling and a "tank tread" on the back for controlled lowering down stairs. It will make this as much a breeze as it can be. The saw should be strapped to the truck tightly, to lock everything together.     What ever you do, DO NOT HAVE ANYONE BELOW THE LOAD WHILE GOING DOWNSTAIRS! Actually, with the stair truck, one decently strong person should be able to get the saw downstairs with no serious problems.     I would NOT recommend a dolly (small, square frame, with four castors on the bottom) because it rolls TOO easily. Great for flat surfaces, but, a recipe for disaster on a slanted surface like a strip of plywood on the stairs.     Did I mention that what ever you do, DO NOT HAVE ANYONE BELOW THE LOAD WHILE GOING DOWNSTAIRS!     It also might well be the BRIGHTEST thing to do to pop that shipping container open, and, start taking things apart, carrying them downstairs one by one. There are probably shims between the base and the table top, so make sure you know where they came from before you put things back together.     Regards     Dave Mundt
    P.S.     DO NOT HAVE ANYONE BELOW THE LOAD WHILE GOING DOWNSTAIRS!          
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Dave, Thanks for very relevant hints. I have already taken some of the steps that you did recommend, such as I moved the table top and wings. The shipping weight was over 600 lbs and the remaining weight is around 350 lbs.
Where I could get the professional help and how much it would cost? Would that be cheaper than to buy the hand truck and all other required auxiliaries? I was looking some hand trucks from Grizzley. What do you think about those?
Cheers, Ollie
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Rent a good one from U-Haul or Home Depot. Unless of course you intend to make a habit of moving these kinds of weight up and down your stairs.
Not to be nosey (OK, just because I am nosey) what kind of stuff are you going to be building down in that basement that needs a 5 HP, 12" to 14" tablesaw? On second thought, you may need to buy that hand truck to move those massive timbers down stairs and whatever you build from them back upstairs :)
Dave Hall
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Dave,
I am lucky that SWMBO is not reading this newsgroup - she could start to think that there is a reason that we are short on money to buy food and clothing. I am a boy and boy needs the toys. :-)
My thought process was the following: - I had the Craftsman table saw and sold it before moving thousands of miles - I want to have my "last" saw which will serve me forever - I don't have any other expensive hobbies, so I could overspend a little bit here - First I was looking for PM66 and Canadian General - Then I was convinced that 12" Grizzly is giving me more iron with less money
With the massive timber reference, the timing of your comment is perfect. Yesterday, my neighbor cut down a huge maple tree. I did ask the crew to save some peaces for me for resawing. Today, I started to move the peaces and they are HEAVY. This is part of the action plan:
1. Ask the professionals to cut a tree 2. Cut the tree into smaller peaces with a chainsaw 3. Haul the peaces into basement 4. Resaw blanks 5. Paint the ends 6. Wait for two years 7. Using router, planer, cabinet saw, shaper, mortiser, and other toys to find the furniture hidden in the tree 8. Add shiny surface 9. Make SWMBO or other good people happy
Cheers, Ollie
PS. Today the truck driver drop a nice block of laminated maple, which will be my workbench top. Now, I am waiting for the Veritas twin-screw vise. The dilemma is that I am missing all the power tools and workbench to build my new workbench.
PPS. I don't yet have the 220 in basement for my cabinet saw. These things can take longer than planned.
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Yeah, in many ways it sounds like me and the jetski. SWMBO really does not understand that $6,000 for a toy I can only use about 4 months or so each year and is only actually used maybe 20 days a year (but what fun days they are). What really confuses her are the two older ones I kept after buying the newer (read: more expensive) one in 2000 - resale ain't for sh*t on these things after 6 or 8 years. . I guarantee I won't get as many years out of it as you will get out of your saw and I will dump more money into it. Yeah, we do like our toys, don't we.
Dave Hall
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Ollie,
When we do residential remod jobs or insurance repairs in occupied homes, I hire movers to come and relocate all the furniture. Usually to the garage or some "out of the war zone" part of the house. It may not be the cheapest way to do things, but they are insured for any damages, breakage, or injuries. They usually charge by the hour with a minimum charge for showing up. check the phone book, make some calls to local guys. If you tell them exactly what you have and arent really picky about precisely what day and time they show, you can haggle a little. Since you dont need anything movd off site, they dont need to have a truck there. I needed a piano moved once and 2 of the guys came on the way home from work and did it for me for $20 each. Worth every dime.
Good luck!
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