Grizzly cabinet saw -- which one?

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wrote:

I never said there was *no* difference. Of COURSE there is, especially when cutting nails! <G>
What I wrote was: "I've noticed that the quality and condition of the blade makes more difference than the horsepower on anything equal to or less than 5/4."
Now, how thick are those waste 2-bys?
Also, what's the moisture content in typical construction lumber?
Barry
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Looks like these are the differences:
Three belts vs. one belt. Larger hand wheels Larger and heavier trunion Stronger motor mount Heavier miter gauge.
Certainly one can align it just as accurately. Perhaps it will stay in tune for as long, but the heavier construction of the CS will limit vibration more and an extra 50% more horse power will help no matter what you are cutting. I kind of like the enclosed base as well.
-Jack
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The enclosed base means better dust control, I think.
One thing nobody's mentioned: do the better cabinet saws lock the height and angle adjustments? I haven't had any trouble with my Griz 1022 losing its height like my first saw, a used Craftsman would. I swear that thing would move up and down when I tried to make a dado.
But I'd kinda like to have some sort of locking mechanism for the height, now that I've had some time to think about it. Which saws, if any, do that?
Dan
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Unisaw has a locking mechanism for height and tilt.

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I think every cabinet saw I've seen has a locking knob for the height/angle The 1023 does and I think you could consider it a low end cabinet saw..
-Jack
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On 12 Aug 2003 10:27:22 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (jcofmars) wrote:

Compare them on a one by one basis, as there are wide variations between saws labelled as contractor's saws.
Some contractor's saws have the same cast iron wings, Bessy fences, etc... as cabinet saws. However, these guys will set you back $700-800, maybe more.
The dust collection issue is easily helped by a velcro mounted hardboard plate over the back, with clearance holes as required. The plate gets removed to tilt the blade. With a zero clearance insert, _all_ table saws spray a lot of dust out the top.
Vibrations can be minimized on a contractor's saw with a link belt, and sand bags over the legs. Without the sandbags, I can stand a nickel on edge while my Jet is running, so I didn't bother with them.
I have not seen a contractor saw with more than 2 HP, most are 1 1/2 HP, so the horsepower contest clearly goes to the 3-5 HP cabinet saw.
Barry
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Interesting take on it. From where I stand (dealing w/ the aggravation of a Sears Craftsman 10" CS, and eyeballing something more) it makes a reasonable amount of sense. What I don't get is why you have to flip the top off to align the saw? Am I missing something here in the overall picture of things? I figured a person would just stick a socket on a long extension up from below, loosen the trunnion mounting bolts a tad, and nudge the mount around a tad, either w/ a lever of some kind (i.e. 2x4) or something like the PALS system, and then tighten things back down. Might be a little tricky if you've put the saw in a mobile base/bench setup, but still not sure I see the need for flipping it over?
TIA,
nuk
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That's what the manual says to do. Honestly for me I would probably try loosening it all from underneath first and see if I could do it without flipping it over. I think I can actually reach the 4 bolts from the back by snaking my hand in there anyway (power off obviously ;) -- it might work. Fortunately I haven't had to yet, if I ever do, I'll post here with how it went.
Mike

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BobAtVandy wrote:

Buy the G1023S - it's a great saw. Spend the money you saved on a good alignment tool, a good blade, and material to build a right-side extension table and a "large" outfeed table (at least 4' square). You'll never regret spending a little extra on a cabinet saw rather than buying a contractor's saw. (I know. I started out with a contractor's saw with a poor-excuse-for-a-fence. It was hard to align and impossible to trust. I sold that and bought a Uni-Saw. Knowing what I know now about blades and proper alignment, I would be very happy to have a G1023S instead of the Uni-Saw.)
As far as right-tilt versus left-tilt goes, I prefer right-tilt so that I can use the < $300 sliding table for cross-cutting. It works great.
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