Got my new spiral cutterhead today


Well finally after a two month wait I got my byrd spiral cutterhead today http://www.byrdtool.com / . It is a generic 6" head and we were not sure if it would fit the shopfox or not. How's this for a box?
http://www.knight-toolworks.com/pictures/cutter1.jpg
http://www.knight-toolworks.com/pictures/cutter2.jpg
They included 10 replacement cutters and the tool to fit them. I bought replacement bearings and that's a good thing I did not want to try to remove the old ones it was worth the extra 15.00 I had to use a block of wood to install the bearings but it only took some extra time. It is easy to remove the old cutterhead you just lower both tables all the way and t here are two nuts on the bottom of the casting to remove and it comes out. Installing it is just a reverse. The key was a very tight fit so I had to install the pulley before I put the cutterhead back on. So I get it all tight raise the table to find the cutterhead just hit it. Well not all of the cutters just a few. It's the same with the infill table too. So I remove it and hit the edges with the angle grinder a couple of tries and the problem is solved. I am not sure if the head was a bit too big around or it's just the tables I know I had to make sure the knives were down in the cutterhead a fair amount or they hit the tables too. But once that was done I got the tables back to normal and everyone else stood back when I turned it on (G) it makes a different sound spinning I think it may just be the new bearing sound. Now the really scary part running the firs piece of wood through. Well it works though I have to adjust the outfeed table a bit. A perfect cut. Well almost. You get a few marks like when you use a flat blade on a smoothing plane you can feel the slight planning marks. I see that but it is no worse then the ripples you get with a regular blade. The wood is nice and shiny and no tearout. I tried bubinga and a couple other tropicals and some curly maple and plain cherry and they came out shiny and tearout free. The feed speed is as slow as when I had a back bevel on the knives. But it cuts far quieter then the regular head.
http://www.knight-toolworks.com/pictures/cutter3.jpg
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Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
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I need to check my scrap pile. :o)
Cutter looks good and probably didn't move!
Shiny Bubinga with no tearout is a Good Thing.
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[snipperified]

That is truly a piece of tooling that looks like it should work fabulously.
I recall, although I don't recall the source, a discussion about freshly machined 'shiny' wood. One side of the discussion called it a phenomenon similar to 'case-hardening' in metal. The mechanical action, so the discussion went, left a glazed barrier layer, micro thin, on the surface of the wood. I have experienced 'shiny' output from my planer and noticed, that unless I scuffed it with 220 grit, the sealer coat simply wouldn't soak in as well. I noticed this on a solid cherry toe-kick where the 'out-of-sight' side behaved quite differently through the finishing stages causing me to experiment.
I have also sanded walnut burl progressively to 4000 grit, which also became pleasantly 'shiny' and the finish soaked in quite well.
Has anyone here experienced that?
Or are the bats in my belfry on the rampage again?
0?0 ?
Rob
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Burnishing. I've seen it when hand planing and also when turning and I rubbed the bevel a bit too aggresively
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myself I don't use the wood right off the planer or jointer. but I have sanded the wood to very fine grits and it finish fine. I glue up the wood all the time right from the jointer without issues.
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Heat is the issue. A board beaten into burnished condition by dull blades or sanded unto ridiculous grits under power can turn back oil finishes. One of the benefits of setting with water before final sanding - by hand - is that it helps break this "case-hardening." Most glues are water-based to some degree, so the benefits should extend to an edge produced by a moderately dull jointer.
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my jointer leaves a shine but it is very sharp just ask my hands (G) but I have done sanding to 1200 grit with a palm sander and my oil and wax finish works just as it does if I sand to 320.00
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Steve Knight wrote:

I like the way the cutters cut at an angle. Somehow I thought they were just staggered, not also angled. The shop where my son works has a great big ol' spiral cutter planer. He said when they got dull the company sent out two men who spent all day rotating the cutters. (They probably serviced other parts too).
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Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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The ones on the grizzly website seem to be the way you describe them: just staggered. The ones from byrdtools though are turned a little. Byrd claims theirs are better, but I'm not sure I could tell the difference.
brian
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the byrd follow the curve of the head pretty much. the cutters also have a curve. that would make them cut cleaner. overall the quality I bet is 10 times better and does not cost much more.
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I guess it would be a slicing action since the knives are at an angle. So are these cutters indexed or is there some sort of alignment tool?
I like the idea of buying the cutter head separately. You could start out with a normal planer or jointer, then upgrade later.
brian
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yes that's the way. someone was telling me the cost of the grizzly head separately and it was more then the jointer (G)
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I spotted a "spiral" cutterhead for PM and Jet that costs a staggering $600!
Dave
Steve Knight wrote:

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