Gluing up a table top

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Obviously. Modern construction techniques and materials does not equate to Wal-Mart furniture.
-- Al Reid
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Well, that's your opinion, of course. And there's a lot of ground between Wal-Mart furniture and "fine-quality" furniture, at least in my mind. For some reason, there's something intrinsically lame about biscuits in my mind when applied to a piece of furniture that I expect to last well beyond my lifetime. And this isn't because I've never used them, because I have. I have a very serviceable Dewalt biscuit jointer that I've used in the past and intend to use in the future on the right projects. I just try to avoid them on something I hope will be an heirloom someday. Oh, well...I'm certainly not in any position to criticize what other people use, so I'll just do my thing and other people will do theirs. Certainly not as important as keeping the distinguished gentleman from Massachusetts out of the White House.
todd
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I'm having a hard time seeing how using biscuits in any way diminishes a "fine furniture" project and causes it not to last beyond your lifetime. I'm certainly not advocating the use of particle board, contact paper and knockdown hardware. I think we are talking about using glue only or glue and biscuits. Oh, well, certainly not that important.
However, I totally and unequivocally agree with your last sentence.
--
Al Reid

How will I know when I get there...
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On Fri, 24 Sep 2004 07:41:42 -0400, "Al Reid"

I'd use knockdown hardware on fine furniture. There's nothing about "fine" that implies traditional and excludes contemporary. Portability isn't contradictory to quality.
Besides which, some of the finest furniture ever built (18th century secretaries and chest-on-chests) used metal knock-down fittings to split in two for shipping and installation.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Andy Dingley wrote:

Not to mention Thomas Jefferson's bookcases.
Mankind has been making portable furniture for as long as we've been making furniture.
That said, I'm still not sure how I feel about biscuits in fine furniture.
--RC
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Rick Cook wrote:

They're a tool, like any tool. You use them where they're the best available solution to the problem, and don't use them where there's another that is better.
Don't get hung up on "this is used in fine furniture and that isn't". Use whatever is most appropriate to the problem at hand.

--
--John
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calmly ranted:

A lot of ground and an entire ocean.

Let's keep the distinguished(?) gentleman from Texas out of the White House for another 4 years, shall we? Vote with your conscience.
-------------------------------------------------------- Murphy was an Optimist ---------------------------- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
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"Todd Fatheree" wrote in message

Yes and no ... depends upon the application to me.
I personally would not consider biscuit joinery in place of traditional joinery techniques on "fine furniture", but I have no qualms about using them where one would normally use splines, or similar joinery methods, in the components of fine furniture.
My use of biscuits in "fine furniture" is generally restricted to two applications: on large panel glue-up for the alignment convenience, and occasionally to strengthen miter joints where I don't want to use a visible, or contrasting color spline, that shows.
Not that it makes a damn, but DJM uses biscuits in more places in his "fine furniture" pieces than I would, and there is little doubt that he has reached "master" status ... but then again, it could be that he does that for public consumption only?
But I know what you mean ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
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A biscuit is just a loose tenon. A biscuit joiner makes the mortices for the loose tenon.
scott
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snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home says...

But are the post-glue up expansion characteristics also true of tenons?
- Al
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Al Spohn wrote:

In a sense it's just an extension of the idea of a wedged tenon--instead of expanding it with a wedge it's expanded with the moisture from the glue.

--
--John
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On Sat, 25 Sep 2004 09:30:53 -0400, "J. Clarke"

But do foxed (blind wedged) tenons have any place in fine furniture ?
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On Sat, 25 Sep 2004 19:05:54 +0100, Andy Dingley

not that I can see... (pun intended)
Mac
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Why not? If you taper the mortise properly you have a hidden dovetail which gives mechanical hold in addition to adhesive hold.
wrote:

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Because you can't ever dismantle them. Definite no-no in fine furniture, because a reasonable definition of "fine" is that you're expecting someone to still care about looking after it in 200 years time.
And you don't need either tapered mortices or glue.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Your definition of fine?
I can make KD furniture too. Does that make it "fine?"
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Andy Dingley wrote:

I'm sorry, but I don't quite see your point. You can't dismantle a solid board either so I guess wood has no place in "fine furniture" by your definition.

--
--John
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writes:

That's like saying that 3/4" cherry plywood is the same as solid 3/4" cherry. Because they serve a similar purpose doesn't mean they're equivalent. I guess the difference to me is the fact that the biscuit or plywood is an engineered material. Heck, maybe unless I'm using hide glue (which I don't), I'm not being consistent on some level.
todd
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wrote:

how you approach your at is a very individual thing, which I think that it needs to be to be creative...
I have a friend that does very good work, who refuses to call anything that isn't finished with hand rubbed oil furniture... he isn't wrong or right, just doing his thing..
I bought a biscuit jointer because even with a drill press and dowel points, my joints always need a bit of alignment and sanding... the biscuit seems to minimize the problem for me, so I use it...
that's why they make paint in all those different colors, so everyone can have one they like.. *g*
Mac
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Well, if it were just Norm, I could write it off to a trim carpentry and construction background...
But David Marks uses them all the time. Worse yet, he uses them to attach edging to MDF or plywood panels, some of which he has veneered personally. ;-)
And in some of the works of the Sainted Krenov, veneer over a stable substrate is taken to a high art.
And many of the better works by artisans of an earlier day are veneered, for wide range of valid reasons.
Solid wood has its place. But so do other constructions. Not all furniture with engineered materials come from Walmart.
Patriarch
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