Gluing chair legs

I've heard a lot different things about this: yellow glue, epoxy, gorilla g lue, and so on. I also heard some good things about a really good woodworke r's hot glue gun. What's the final word on this? What really works? Some o f the loose legs are a nice tight fit but others are not.
Thanks,
Mike
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On Sunday, August 21, 2016 at 1:41:33 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:

ker's hot glue gun. What's the final word on this? What really works? Some of the loose legs are a nice tight fit but others are not.

There is no single glue that will do everything (with the possible exceptio n of epoxy) I had a brief flirtation with Gorilla Glue a few years ago. I t seems its touted waterproof capabilities greatly out distance reality, as every exterior project I built with it (as opposed to Titbond III or epoxy ) fell apart after a few months.
If I were fixing a chair, epoxy would be my first choice. If the mortise w ere loose, I would shim it with veneer, making sure the epoxy was on both s ides of the veneer.
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On Sunday, August 21, 2016 at 3:30:14 PM UTC-5, Dr. Deb wrote:

orker's hot glue gun. What's the final word on this? What really works? So me of the loose legs are a nice tight fit but others are not.

It seems its touted waterproof capabilities greatly out distance reality, as every exterior project I built with it (as opposed to Titbond III or epo xy) fell apart after a few months.

sides of the veneer.
Deb and John, Thanks for the good info! I'll try epoxy first, since I have it on hand. If I can't make that work, I'll try the specialized product.
Mike
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Chair Doctor needs to soak into the wood to be effective - if the wood is totally clogged with previous glue or epoxy - Chair Doctor is not the best choice. You might wish to use epoxy on the loosest joints and use Chair Doctor on the slightly loose joints - prior to other glues or epoxy. Good luck. John T.
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On Monday, August 22, 2016 at 10:05:46 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

John, I think I will be using both. We bought several chairs for a studio and they have varying degrees of issues. Thanks! Mike
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On Monday, August 22, 2016 at 10:54:11 AM UTC-4, Michael wrote:

dworker's hot glue gun. What's the final word on this? What really works? Some of the loose legs are a nice tight fit but others are not.

. It seems its touted waterproof capabilities greatly out distance reality , as every exterior project I built with it (as opposed to Titbond III or e poxy) fell apart after a few months.

th sides of the veneer.

If you can't make the epoxy work, put down the stir stick and step away from the workbench. ;-)
Tip: Coat any surface where you don't want to sand/scrape/chip the epoxy away from with a thin layer of Vaseline. For example, put Vaseline on the exposed portions of the legs near the glue joint. Any squeeze out will not adhere to the Vaseline and will be easy to wipe away. (Keep future plans for finishing in mind before you do this. The Vaseline could impact that part of the project.)
When the kids and I were building Soap Box Derby cars and needed to epoxy items that involved bolts (nuts or threaded steel plates) we would coat the threads with Vaseline. We could then use the bolts to align and/or clamp the object without fear of the bolt and the part becoming one.
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On Sun, 21 Aug 2016 11:41:16 -0700 (PDT), Michael

I've used this with good results.
http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?cat=1,110&p0261
John T.
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