Glue Finish


I finally got thru fiddling with my Teddy bear bank prototype where it was ready for finish. Usually I use water-based poly, but was out.
Because I use thinned Titebond II for gluing patterns I thought about using that, but thought it might leave a yellowing tink. Awhile back I'd gotten a small bottle of white glue to use to add additional strength to sawdust clay. I'd be adding water anyway, so decided to try that too. Then I'd gotten a small bottle of Elmer's white school at Wally World for $.25. Decided to thin that and try that too.
Got some scraps wood, painted half with white latex, and left half clear, then coated sections with the X-brand white glue, Elmer's white glue, and Titebond II glue, all thinned half and half.
I'd been thinking the Titebond would probably leave a yellowish tind over the wite paint, but all three came out clear, with no difference I could see.
I'd called Franklin on using Titebond this way before I tried it. They said there was no reason it wouldn't work, but it would be best to keep it out of sunlight, as they don't test it for UV, being as it's normally used between pieces of wood, and not exposed. However, I was also told they some sculptures coat pieces kept outside with unthinned Titebond, and apparently no negative results.
My banks aren't exactly museum quality pieces, but I've spent time getting the pieces to fit closely, and they look prety good. So I went ahead and tried a coat of thinned Elmer's on the Teddy bear bank, and it looked good, after it dried. So put on another coat, and it's still looking good. I'll be doing some more experimenting with this, but for now I think this is going to be my finish of choice for my banks. It's sure a lot less esxpensive then the water-based poly, and I can' tell the difference by looking.
Besides saving money on the finish, while I was fiddlin' with measurements and assembling the money box, I figured out how to save maybe 10-15 minutes of assembly time, and how to skip some steps that turned out to be un-needed. All that from just sitting down and thinking about what I wanted to do, then how I wanted to do it.
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"J T" wrote in message

AKA "the secret to success".
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Sat, Aug 12, 2006, 9:41pm (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Swingman) doth sayeth: AKA "the secret to success".
Damn, you mean I've got to start thining if I want to be successful? Damn.
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"J T" wrote in message
(Swingman) doth sayeth:

Nope ... apparently, with regard to glue finish, no further "thining" is necessary. ;)
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Sun, Aug 13, 2006, 8:38am (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Swingman) .doth elucidate: Nope ... apparently, with regard to glue finish, no further "thining" is necessary. ;)
Good, 'cause when I works, I works hard. When I plays, I plays hard. When I sits, I sits loose. And when I thinks, I fall asleep.
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I've looked at my test pieces today, with the benefit of dailight. Interesting.
The odd white glue didn't fare too well. Looks like the latex hadn't been touched, and can't really say much for the unpainted wood. I'll use it in some sawdust clay, and hope for the best. I won't be buying any more.
The Titebond II does leave a faint yellowish cast n the white. Nothing objectionable, but there if you look. The unpainted wood looks good. I usually glue a business card inside my banks, but this down-sized version doesn't have the space inside for that. So glued one on the outside bottom, with the month and year added, and then smeared some Titebond on top of it with my finger. It does show some yellowish tinge, in particular where it was smeared on a bit thicker. Again, not objectionable, but definitely there.
The Elmer's white glue came out with more a satin sheen than gloss. Pretty nice really. Very clear on the white. The wood came out comperable to the Titebond.
Used over any color but white I don't think you'd be able to see any yellowish cast at all from the Titebond. But, as I use at least a little white on most of my banks, I think I'll be using Elmer's for my funishes. My choice for gluie-ups will remain Titebond II.
I'll experiment a bit more, but actually think I'm pretty well set as is.
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Did you include a test where the finish gets wet in your experiments?
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Mon, Aug 14, 2006, 11:51pm (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net ( snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net()) for some reason doth query: Did you include a test where the finish gets wet in your experiments?
Well yeah, if I figure it's gonna get wet. You figure somone's gonna pee on the bank?
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Well, when I think of coin banks I also think of children. I wouldn't expect anyone to pee on a bank, but when it comes to kids under 5 or so, most anything is possible. Never know then that toddler might decide it's a good idea to pour a glass of water through the coin slot. And if it should get dirty, as objects handled by kids often do, what would most people use to clean it?
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Wed, Aug 16, 2006, 11:17pm (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net ( snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net()) doth puteth out: Well, when I think of coin banks I also think of children. I wouldn't expect anyone to pee on a bank, but when it comes to kids under 5 or so, most anything is possible. Never know then that toddler might decide it's a good idea to pour a glass of water through the coin slot. And if it should get dirty, as objects handled by kids often do, what would most people use to clean it?
I can see where you might think of kids in connection with a bank. When I think of kids u nder 5 or so I think of putting a bank out of their reach - small kids ten to put things in their mouthse, and it's possible they could shake a coin out. That would also tend to keep them fro pouring liquids in them.
As far as getting dirty, I don't see why you'd expect a kid to be handling the bank often enough to get it dirty. If it does, dust it, or wipe it off with a cloth, damp if it's really dusty - Titebond II IS rated as water resistant, I've got a chalk frog bank, I've owned it around 55 years. Knowing that finish can't be very durable. It gets ligltly dusted once in awhile and the only finish damage is the small decal telling where itt was bought wore off. The inside of my banks don't have any finish by the way. I'll tell you what tho, if you were to buy one of my banks, and it's damaged beyond repair because some kid poursl liquid in it, Ior the finish doesn't hold up longer than 50 years, contact me personally, and 'll replace it free of charge..
Personally, if I gought something that the finish didn't hold up, I wouldn't worry about it a whole lot, I'd just put a new coat of finish of some type on it.
You worry too much.
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I've been using diluted white glue for several years now on unfinished wooden toys where I need to add a decal. I usually just spread it on with my finger, let it dry about 30 mins and apply the decal. Never had any trouble with it and it is clear to the point of being invisible. Never thought of using it as a finish. May give it a try and see how it works, wonder if it will be gloss or satin? Thanks for the tip.

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I used white glue as a finish for a skateboard back in the 70s. Worked quite well. Hadn't tried it since as I now have money. :)

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Sun, Aug 13, 2006, 4:38am (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (CW) doth sayeth: I used white glue as a finish for a skateboard back in the 70s. Worked quite well. Hadn't tried it since as I now have money. :)
I can afford to buy a can of finish every once in awhile, but I like to speermint. I like the results of tea stain too.
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Sat, Aug 12, 2006, 10:52pm (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net (sweetsawdust) does send thanks but no mney: <snip> wonder if it will be gloss or satin? Thanks for the tip. "J T"
Seems to be more satin than gloss. I only used two coats, I'm gonna try three with the next one, to see if there's any discernable difference.
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