glue

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Geez Lew. much cheaper in the 55 gallon drum compared to the TBII at about $20. ;~)
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"Leon" wrote:

I reserve 55 gallon drums for my epoxy base resin.
Lew
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;~)
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On 12/03/2009 01:52 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

In general, liquid polyurethane glues (like Gorilla glue) want a very tight fit (it's not gap filling at all) and sufficient humidity.
On the plus side, it is water resistant, has a longer open time than PVA can glue different materials together, and doesn't need the mixing that epoxy does.
Chris
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If one uses a fair bit of epoxy, the MixPac dispensers are pretty easy to use. A fresh tip, a whole variety of viscosities and set-up times. The smaller types are most economical for the lower quantity user. Larger systems cost a lot to start off with, but the price per ml goes down. The 50 ml guns are ideal.
http://www.adhesivepackaging.com/images/pix_twocomp_mxp-50t.jpg
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On Thu, 3 Dec 2009 11:52:28 -0800, the infamous "Lew Hodgett"

So, the list lengthens. We have Searz (Crapsman tools), Thompson (Water Seal), Wagner (paint tools), Feit (compact fluorescent bulbs), and now Gorilla (glue) as companies whose marketing departments apparently outstrip their manufacturing prowess by several hundred percent, eh?
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On 12/03/2009 12:22 PM, Nonny wrote:

For basic shop stuff, sheet goods, and panel glue-ups, yellow glue. If consideration is made for expansion, panels almost never come apart, and if they do it's easy to clean up the glue line and glue it back together. I like the LV glue, but TBIII is good as well. Both of them will work at fairly low temperatures, important up here in the winter.
For joints on "good" pieces that might need to be repaired sometime down the line, liquid hide glue or epoxy. Both of them are repairable in ways that yellow glue isn't. Epoxy can also have a longer open time, and fills gaps structurally, which hardly any other glue does.
I'd like to try plastic resin glue, but in the winter I'd have to use a heat blanket to keep it warm enough to cure.
I've used Roo Glue on melamine. Worked reasonably well.
Chris
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I've been buying Elmer's Woodworking glue for over 30 years--it does the job. A gallon lasts me about 10-20 months. Over the years I can now judge how much glue to apply with very little squeeze-out.
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Nonny wrote:

water resistance, then Titebond III. Epoxy for gap- or hole-filling. Haven't tried hide glue yet, but I will, because it's reversible and repairable.
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My favorite is Lee Valley 2002 GF. Flows nice, clean up easily. If I need a waterproof, I use TB III.
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Titebond III for most glue ups; Plastic resin glue for complicated glue-ups needing longer open time; Epoxy (West system 105/207) for bent laminations and veneer glue ups; Contact cement for attaching plastic laminate to substrate; Roo glue when smooth surfaces like melamine are involved.

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On Thu, 03 Dec 2009 19:59:12 -0800, Jim Hall wrote:

Epoxy for veneer? That's new to me. Please elaborate.
--
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I used West epoxy at the suggestion of an instructor to attach veneer to a couple panels. A filler was added. He liked the stuff because it had no bleed through. He sold sushi boards on the side and used epoxy exclusively for attaching the veneers..

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"Jim Hall" wrote:

Epoxy is another one of those slippery slopes.
Lew
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I've become addicted to this stuff: http://www.titebond.com/WNTBIIFluorescent.asp
Nothing worse than getting to the stain stage and finding a problem. This stuff takes out all the guess work.
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That doesn't look like it costs any more than the regular Titebond II. I might have to get some when I use up the gallon of Titebond II.
Puckdropper
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