Garage Storage Cabinets ??

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"Lee Michaels" wrote

As with all shop endeavors, you gotta do something with the scraps, and pig skin is more suitable for shop use.
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On Mar 25, 11:02 pm, "Lee Michaels"

As Edwin is a wrecker of note, the whole pig idea came about when he attempted to make silk purses. After using the sow's ears, what to do with the rest of the pig... what to do... BURN the thing... and that smelled kinda good. The rest is history.
My connection with pigs is trying to make them fly.
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Robatoy wrote:

with the rest of the pig... what to do... BURN the thing... and that smelled kinda good. The rest is history.
Is that the same pig that had an artifical back leg?
Pig was so good the didn't want to eat him all at once.
Lew
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"Robatoy" wrote

http://sivers.org/images/diving_pig.jpg
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I see your pig and raise you Elvis in an elegant swine dive into Swine Lake.
http://www.nauert.com/pictures/ranelvis.jpg
(Randy is an old connection from the AMUG hay days. That picture is NOT shopped.)
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RE: Subject
Find a used office furniture and check out 4 drawer filing cabinets.
HON will be cheaper, but chintzy.
BTW, 2 high & 4 high are almost the same price.
Lew
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I would use 3/4" plywood and pocket hole joinery.
I would make flat slab doors(3/4") banded with iron on tape and use euro hinges. (1/2" will not work with euro)
I would alo hang them with a french cleat.(1/2" back)
With a table saw and Kreg jig, you could crank them out in day or two.
A wipe on poly or even my newest favorite, gel varnish would be a good choice with stain being optional.
dan wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

I planned on the Euro style. The pocket hole joinery. Will it provide enough "bite" into the 3/4" ply or would I need to add some "support". I've not done pocket hole joinery so if it seems like a dumb question ...
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Yes.. pocket holes have been used for many years in the cabinet industries. With the Kreg jig available now, it makes a perfect joint for cabinets.
Go here: http://www.kregtool.com /
and look around.
http://www.kregtool.com/information_center/index.php#eurostyleCabinets
I have built "many" cabinets using glue and pocket holes joinery with ZERO failure.
The screws are really just a replacement for clamps and make the assemble twice as fast.
After you have done one cabinet, you will be standing there wondering where this has been during your woodworking.
dan wrote:

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with my new Kreg master system. It's too freakin' easy!
Tom
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On 21 Mar 2008 13:40:36 GMT, "dan" <> wrote:

Instead of building cabinets, you can get unwanted cabinets from a kitchen remodel for much less than the plywood you plan to buy. If you recycle the cabinets they are already finished, otherwise consider pre-finished 3/4" ply.
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wrote:

Just this week, I missed one of those opportunities.
They were all stacked up in front of the house, but before I could get back with the truck, it had poured!
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dan wrote:

Before you make the final plan you may consider movable cabinets. My main work bench is on wheels with storage underneath. It is the same height as my table saw so can be used as either and indeed or out feed table. I can also arrange it into the most convenient arrangement for either the router or table saw. (Putting parts that I am working on)
I don't remember where but I recently saw a short video of someone's workshop garage, where the made four or five common cabinets all on wheels and the same height. he also made other modules for drill press, table saw, router, etc. that were all of he same working height of the cabinets.
When not in use he would line them up along one of the garage walls. when doing a project he would arrange the cabinets to gain the optimally work flow.
If he were working on a car he could then move the appropriate modules to make it convenient for working on the car.
If we ever get into a position where we are going to be in one house long enough I plan to make my work shop similarly.
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dan wrote:

1. If you want them to look nice, do NOT use fir/pine plywood. The grain will telegraph through anything. Birch ply would not telegraph. In any case, use 3/4.
2. If you want your doors to stay flat, do NOT make plywood slab doors; do not make frame and panel doors with plywood panels - not even 1/4" ply, 1/4" masonite (especially tempered) is OK. _____________
If it were me, I would...
1. Make the boxes of 3/4 melmine board. Bottoms with a 3/8 x 3/8 tongue at the top (of the edge) glued into a dado on the sides. Tops the same with the tongue glued into a rabbet at the top of the sides.
2. I would put a 3/4 x 2-3" nailing board under the back edge of the top. I usually screw it on through the top but if the top of the cabinet is visible I would rout off just the melamine and glue it on. If the wall of the garage where the cabinet will be looks decent I would do nothing else; if not, I would rabbet the back edge of the cabinet all around so I could glue/screw on a piece of 1/8" white tile board.
3. I would make a plinth of 2x4 pressure treated lumber (smaller than the cabinet so as to create a toe kick), set the cabinet on it, shim as necessary, screw through the nailing board into garage wall, screw through cabinet bottom into 2x4 plinth. The plinth itself should be fastened to garage floor.
4. I would make overlay doors in one of three ways... a) T&G or half lap frame and hardboard panel b) solid glued up from whatever - even ripped up 2x4s c) frame of 1/2 - 3/4 stock with 1/8" ply door skins or hardboard glued to each side
5. Most base cabinets are around 24" deep. If you have room, that's the depth I would make them. However, cabinets that deep are a nuisance in as much as it is hard to get to stuff in the back; consequently, I usually make a frame with shelves that I attach to the back of the door. I have made them in depths varying from 4" - 12". Naturally, the main cabinet shelves have to have a width narrow enough to accomodate the door shelves. The doors (and hinges) also have to be strong enough and allow for their attachment...b & c above are suitable, "a" may be too if the frames are wide enough and the weight to be hung on them isn't a lot.
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dadiOH
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Uhhhhh. You just used up the only two basic styles of cabinet doors.
What type of door would you recommend ?
dadiOH wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

What I said... 4. I would make overlay doors in one of three ways... a) T&G or half lap frame and hardboard panel b) solid, glued up from whatever - even ripped up 2x4s c) frame of 1/2 - 3/4 stock with 1/8" ply door skins or hardboard glued to each side
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dadiOH
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On 21 Mar 2008 13:40:36 GMT, "dan" <> wrote:

On my last garage I made several top and bottom cabinets using 1/2" plywood. I found 1/2" thickness plywood is more than adequate. However, for the adjustable shelving, I used both side 1/4" plywood sandwiches with leftover 1/2" plywood (cut to size to obtain 3/4" thickness and glue three to four lengthwise and at both ends). You really cannot tell whether I use 3/4" or ½" plywood. There are no signed of sagging. You can see pics of the cabinets in abpw, under "Garage Cabinets."
I moved and now planning to make the same ½" plywood, face frame top and lower cabinets. As for the "feet," or Kick Frame," I use ½" leftover plywood running the full length of lower cabinets. I save time and plywood using this method. You can learn more if you can get hold of a copy of "American Woodworking" February 1999, #71 (Built tour own "Shop Cabinets" page 42). Further, I strongly suggest you email John Paquay snipped-for-privacy@insighttbb.com, http://home.insightbb.com/~jpaquay to buy ($9) a copy of "Building Your Own Kitchen Cabinetry."
Good Luck.
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