Freud Dado Set

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I was in Lowe's the other day and saw a Freud 8 (and 1/2", I think) stackable dado set for just under $100. What kind of experiences have people had with this set? Compared to a $260 Forrest, I'm assuming the Freud will tear out the edges more and leave more ridges in the bottom of the dado?
Thanks, Mike
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That would be the Freud SD208, which is consistently rated as a best buy among stack dado sets. I have the SD206, which is the 6" version, and just as good. Cuts are very clean and flat-bottmed. Unless you're doing mission-critical dados in veneered or laminated materials, the Freud should serve you well.
Check your saw manual for the recommended dado size - the 6" is probably what you want, unless you're running a cabinet saw. It's a bit of a strange move that HD only carries the 8" version, since probably 90% of their market is portable and contractor's saws.
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snipped-for-privacy@fast.net wrote:

Not strange at all that the Home De Pot would not have the right tool/part and instead has the one that is available at the "right" price.
Why I'd even bet money that the "expert" in the tool section would gladly explain how that blade fits nicely on any 10" circular or chop saw.
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...

An 8" Dado on a circular saw... now there's a scary thought. That's almost as bad as a moulding head. ;-)
-Mike
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I suspect that feed rate makes much more difference than diameter. How many of you are using the full depth of cut on an 8" dado without a sled in hard maple?
I've never made a dado deeper than 3/8" which my Dad's old 1/2HP contractor saw can usually do Just Fine without bogging down.
It might take a bit more time for the blade to spin up--second moment varies as the square of the spinning diameter. Caculate the difference for homework . . .
But the load on the motor during actual cutting depends on your depth of cut, feed rate, and material.
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"Check your saw manual for the recommended dado size - the 6" is probably what you want, unless you're running a cabinet saw. It's a bit of a strange move that HD only carries the 8" version, since probably 90% of their market is portable and contractor's saws."
I use an 8 inch stackable dado set on my Jet contractor's saw with no problems at all.
Dick Durbin Tallahassee
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Olebiker wrote:

I did this for years with no problems at all.
Barry
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It's not the diameter of the dado set that matters but the rotation speed. The SD208 is recommended for no more than 9000 RPM, which is about twice as fast as most 10" table saws turn. I will grant that my 1.5 HP, 10" contractor saw takes a few extra split seconds to come up to speed with the SD208 but once it is spinning, it has no problems...other than some tearout cutting across the face grain of birch ply.

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Olebiker wrote:

1.5 HP motor? I've got a 110V/1.5 HP contractor's saw, and I've been planning for awhile now to go pick up one of the dadoes in question. It looks like a good set in the store, and it's available cash and carry, which is always a bonus in my book.
(Of course, it looks like I'm definitely in for $5,000 on the insurance for sure, with possibly as much as another $2,000 on top of that. So I guess it's reality check time. Wimminz are SO expensive.)
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Yup! Ihave a Delta contractors saw with 1-1/2 HP motor. I swings a 8" dado with no problem. I would definitely NOT buy a 6" dado!! Greg
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The 8" is perfectly suited to the 1.5 hp contractors saws. I bought a Ridge Carbide and asked about it. He says the 6" are for the small saws like the benchtops.
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It's one of the new Sears', with a 1.75hp motor. I believe the manual reccomends an 8, but will double check before buying. Thanks.
-Mike
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MSCHAEF.COM wrote:

Do yourself a favor and get an eight inch. A six inch may not work with a sled. Once you use a sled to dado, you'll never use a miter gauge again.
Barry
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After a few simple mitered cross cuts with the miter gauge, I'm already contemplating building a sled... I have a bunch of MDF I can use, and maybe some oak for the rails. :-)
-Mike
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What are the advantages of the sled with the dado? I have only used a sled for crosscutting so far.
Gerry
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G.E.R.R.Y. wrote:

It's amazingly apparent when you're dadoing a 5-6 foot plywood or MDF shelf side! <G>
The work doesn't drag on the table, the whole shebang can be counterbalanced for ease of movement, and stops can be easily installed for duplication.
See here:
<http://www.bburke.com/wood/sleds.htm
Scroll down to the sled with a paint can on it. The larger the part, the more help the sled is.
Have fun, Barry
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I just bought one at Amazon for $50 (gloat, gloat, gloat) and have used it twice. The first time it couldn't have been better. The second time I found the 1/16" cutter was a bit deeper than the 1/8" cutters. It was fine for this particular purpose, but hardly good. If I had paid $100 I would have been dissappointed.
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toller wrote:

Amazon back in 2002. Why/how did the price come down that far that fast, especially given the fact they are made in Italy and the dollar is in the toilet??
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DIYGUY wrote:

You might be comparing apples and oranges. Freud makes a number of different dado sets.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Amazon had some serious seasonal pricing anomalies. Some of the erroneous pricing made it through to the customer(s). Not everyone got their 'confirmed' orders.
A rift in the space-time continuum...
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