Framed dollhouse structure

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Charlie Self wrote:
| Another point, too, is I don't really think I want to deal with | framing | miniature roofs on some of those Victorian tower concepts. Today, | you | can't hire a slate roofer, in most places, who can deal with the | full-sized versions. That's not nearly as difficult as framing the | thing.
I don't think the framing would be as difficult as you're making it out to be; but a slate roof sounds fairly gruesome - first you'd have to split the slate to scale, then you'd need a slate hammer small enough to tap out the nail holes, ...
How about a copper roof?
| My wife's cousin, who is a successful upscale building contractor, | notes that there's really nothing difficult about building today's | homes: they're all based on the 90 deg. angle. As were the Victorian | homes, but inside, and out, the square got tossed for the protractor | and compass, with lots of round work. | | My vestigial math skills went and hid as soon as I considered that.
Not to worry - just get yourself a CAD package and let it worry about the trig. :-)
| Maybe Craftsman style?
Much overdone. /Everybody's/ done that already - might as well just _buy_ a doll house.
B'sides, just think how much fun it'll be to do all that gingerbread trim. Hmm - I bet John Morehead could help out with that part...
(Speaking of whom, anybody heard from John lately?)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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Copper is fine. I'd almost bet that before I'm through looking, I find someone making scale slate slabs for roofing.

Ew. I have to use CAD, but, so far, about 75% of the time when I measure an angle from the CAD, or, rather, when I transfer the measured angle, it is miserably inexact in real life. This may be my ineptness, but it's a great hindrance anyway.

Gingerbread trim is the easiest part--about every bit of it you could desire is available in different scales, from porch posts on to gable end trim.
I dunno. I may work up a replica of a house that no longer exists, my grandmother's place. The farm that surrounded it is a development now, and the house burned down years ago, but...I can still remember a lot of it. Doesn't have to be accurate, sort of a late 19th century Piedmont Virginia farmhouse in a stucco design.
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Ew. I have to use CAD, but, so far, about 75% of the time when I measure an angle from the CAD, or, rather, when I transfer the measured angle, it is miserably inexact in real life.
If everything was made according to that plan and done accurately, the angles would work. It's inexactness in the work, not the software.
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Maybe. But when I spec a 45 degree angle, place it according to the program and come back later to find it's a 44.2 deg. angle, according to the program that set it at 45 deg., I do wonder. Autosketch 8, if you're wondering, and it has been a fairly consistent "feature" of AS for some time now. It does great with 90 degrees. Otherwise, I guess I'm just speccing it incorrectly, eh?
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Maybe. But when I spec a 45 degree angle, place it according to the program and come back later to find it's a 44.2 deg. angle, according to the program that set it at 45 deg., I do wonder. Autosketch 8, if you're wondering, and it has been a fairly consistent "feature" of AS for some time now. It does great with 90 degrees. Otherwise, I guess I'm just speccing it incorrectly, eh?
Check your "snaps" setting. I use TurboCad (still on version 7) and I often forget to release the "snaps" feature from the snaps-to-grid setting. That causes the end result to jump to the nearest grid point vs. my intended point. Just a thought.
--
NuWave Dave in Houston



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Can I bang my head against the desk now, or should I save it for later. Sheest. Stupid, long term mistake. The joys of DIY learning.
Thank you!
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Wow! Len, thanks a million. A few hours checking catalogs--the joys of a dial-up modem--and I may change back to doing a stick framed house, if I can manage to convert one scale to another with the materials. It has to be one helluva lot easier to buy planks and siding and framing lumber than to do as I did part of yesterday and too much of today. And basswood is a better choice than yellow poplar, I'm sure, though the poplar I've got here is super dry and straight.
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wrote:
Wow! Len, thanks a million. A few hours checking catalogs--the joys of a dial-up modem--and I may change back to doing a stick framed house, if I can manage to convert one scale to another with the materials. It has to be one helluva lot easier to buy planks and siding and framing lumber than to do as I did part of yesterday and too much of today. And basswood is a better choice than yellow poplar, I'm sure, though the poplar I've got here is super dry and straight.
Charlie, If you do go ahead with this project, please take pictures. I (for one, and I'm sure there are plenty of others) would really enjoy seeing the works in progress.
Max
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wrote:
Wow! Len, thanks a million. A few hours checking catalogs--the joys of a dial-up modem--and I may change back to doing a stick framed house, if I can manage to convert one scale to another with the materials. It has to be one helluva lot easier to buy planks and siding and framing lumber than to do as I did part of yesterday and too much of today. And basswood is a better choice than yellow poplar, I'm sure, though the poplar I've got here is super dry and straight.
You're more than welcome Charlie.
I think you'll find this web page handy for doing 1:x to 1:y scale conversions:
http://www.wwmodelclub.org/extra/sd_scalecalc2.htm
You might also find a "feet/inch and fractions" calculator from the BORG handy.
Len
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Very handy web site...first glance told me the scales for even the largest model railroads are too small. Way too small, as in O gauge is 1:48, while my needs are 1:12.
I've got one (or more) of those calculators around here. Amongst at least 50,000 other pieces of paper and cardboard. I may just make the 70 mile round trip to the store, though, because looking for needles in haystacks is not my specialty.
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wrote:

though
Very handy web site...first glance told me the scales for even the largest model railroads are too small. Way too small, as in O gauge is 1:48, while my needs are 1:12.
I've got one (or more) of those calculators around here. Amongst at least 50,000 other pieces of paper and cardboard. I may just make the 70 mile round trip to the store, though, because looking for needles in haystacks is not my specialty.
Charlie,
If you're doing 1:12 all you need is a decent architects ruler. It will have a 1" = 1' scale, with the first 'foot' marked off in inches.
Len
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.

I've got a couple of those around somewhere, too. Shop or office, maybe both. Sigh. The joys of being something less than neat.
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Model railroaders have stick built bridges that might give you some tips. Check out their special interest books, hobby supply catalogs, and visit a rr display. They use scale cut bass wood available at craft stores. They even use tiny mitre cutters. Hope you're a patient man, because as a builder of stick built old time model airplanes, this will take about 4X what you imagine. But it's a labor of love!
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Elliott) wrote in 3136.bay.webtv.net:

Harbor Freight has a couple small power saws if you're doing a lot of cutting. One's a 3" table saw, the other's a miter saw. (I don't know if it's a compound miter saw.)
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:
> Hope you're a patient man, because as a builder of stick built old time > model airplanes, this will take about 4X what you imagine. But it's a > labor of love!
You do tickle the cob webs of my memory.
Spent a lot of time building balsa, stick model airplanes in my youth.
Lots of straight pins and quick dry, Testors model airplane glue gets the job done.
Even won a few prizes at the County fair with some of them.
This was long before glue sniffing was the craze.
Don't have a clue if Testors is still in business.
Lew
Lew
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It is.

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Lew Hodgett wrote:
| snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote: | | > Hope you're a patient man, because as a builder of stick built | old time > model airplanes, this will take about 4X what you | imagine. But it's a > labor of love! | | You do tickle the cob webs of my memory. | | Spent a lot of time building balsa, stick model airplanes in my | youth. | | Lots of straight pins and quick dry, Testors model airplane glue | gets | the job done. | | Even won a few prizes at the County fair with some of them.
What's even more fun is that there're people building "stick models" with spruce and epoxy and Dacron that when finished, they climb in and fly.
AFAICT from looking, it's the same kind of construction - but they do seem a lot more preoccupied with making everything "just so" than I remember being while putting my old Comet models together...
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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Morris Dovey wrote:
> What's even more fun is that there're people building "stick models" > with spruce and epoxy and Dacron that when finished, they climb in and > fly.
SFWIW, that's exactly the method used to build the male mold for the boat I'm building.
Started out with 2x12x24ft Doug Fir timber and cut them up to yield 1-1/2W x 5/8 tk x 24 ft long stringers.
Then cut 12:1 scarfs on the end and glued together to get 60 ft strips.
Spend a whole Saturday doing that.
Filled a dumpster with saw dust.
My best guess was I made about 6,000 ft of cuts that day.
Those strips were then attached to the profiles with deck screws. Probably had 10,000 of them screwed in before it was over.
All of that ended up in the landfill once the hull was finished.
Lew
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OK Charlie. This is for when you get all tired and frustrated from working on it. Take a look at this and thank the Gods you aren't this anal. http://www.aonx97.dsl.pipex.com/int-page/intpage2/intpage2.htm
JOAT Bugrit. Millennium hand AND shrimp.
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On Jan 22, 12:27am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

That Norton engine looks like a full-sized one I helped rebuild too many years ago. The blued pipe makes me think that model actually runs.
These guys are much better at miniaturization than I ever will be. Great stuff there.
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