Framed dollhouse structure

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Has anyone built a dollhouse using a stick-built frame?
I'm thinking of doing something like that, using basic construction techniques for the '90s (1890s), but my brain is simply pulling a plug when it comes time to figure a reasonably fast and secure method for the framing members. Epoxy? Expensive, but workable. Short brads?
I've built dollhouses before, but never using stick-built methods. Plywood is easier, but...
This is probably overkill, but it's something I figured might be fun to do (or it might drive me even further round the bend).
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Of course models used for demonstrating construction techniques are often done this way. Depending on handling, you might just go with CA for a model, giving instant gratification, all the way to proportioned bass and a brad driver, including the almost inevitable "peeks" for a real frame.
For a dollhouse, plywood's all you need, unless you're planning a cutaway. Why work so hard on something you can't see?
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>Depending on handling, you might just go with CA for a

OK. CA makes sense. Yeah, well...two reponses for the "can't see argument." It's sort of like hidden dovetails, which can't be seen. It may prove to be so difficult I abandon it after a few days, but I think it's going to be fun to try.
The smart ass answer, one I picked up from another boot at Parris Island, a few years ago: "My daddy says someone who doesn't shine the backs of his shoes probably also doesn't wipe his ass." Just 'cause you can't see it doesn't mean it's not important.
I've also noticed that some kits are, or were, built that way. I need to go find a couple, but there is a paucity of such places now that chain crafts stores have taken over the business.
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Hi Charlie,
You might want to consider CA (Super Glue) with an accelerator spray. Apply a drop of glue, fix the position, hit it with the zap juice, and it's done. Move on to the next joint and repeat.
We use the accelerator spray at work on a number of things we repair, it takes the waiting and holding issues right out of the mix ... and in your case, eliminating the need for fixtures or jigs to hold things together.
Also, I think I have an older doll house kit stashed away somewhere, let me dig it out and see if it has any info you could use (you're welcome to the kit if you want).
Regards,
Rick
"Charlie Self" wrote ...

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Hey Charlie,
When I was about 14 years old I built a 1/10th scale model of a wood working shop with equipment and all. I made the lumber with a saber saw mounted in a table and from a scrap piece of cedar trim. It had the usual 2x4 framing and a hinged rafter roof. Elmer's glue held the 2x4's in place with no siding. This worked fine until we had a hurricane blow into town, pop out a window above the model and drench the shop. The 2x4's warped and it had to be scrapped.
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A real-life lesson made to order! Carla?
--
NuWave Dave in Houston



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Celia, 1970
Carla was my first followed by Beulah and Celia in Corpus Christi and then Alicia in Houston in 1983.
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"Leon" wrote in message

And your first 9/11 most likely ...

Audrey, in 1957, is the first one that really caught my attention. I was 14 at the time. Wasn't much of an impact on us, but we got to miss school.
Alicia is the first to directly effect me more than a few hours ... I lived in the Heights then and it looked a war zone. We were without power for 2 weeks, but other than a downed tree, we suffered no real damage. One of our neighbors was not so lucky, and was killed by a tree falling on the house.
Allison/2001, no hurricane but a tropical storm, cost me my home due to flooding. I NEVER want to go through that again. I'm still looking for "stuff" I thought I still had, but don't.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 1/06/07
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I was living on W25th between Shepherd and Durham for Alicia. We were so lucky; our power outage lasted less than a day! But I remember the water completely covered the yard, front and back, one of a few times that having a pier and beam foundation was of serious advantage. I still had pecan wood when I sold that house in 1989.
--
NuWave Dave in Houston



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I was 7 and like you, remember missing school for a couple of days. Same with Beulah. Cielia scared me to death. We had a whole roof setting the street in front of our house. We sat in the master bathroom during the whole storm and felt the walls shake constantly. Yelling was the only way to comunicate. IIRC electricity was out for several weeks. We went back to school before we had electricity restored. I remember seeing a Uhaul trailer setting on top of a house and almost all man hole covers had popped up and were setting beside the holes. I ran from Rita because of Cielia.
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wrote:

Just a thought but try Titebond or whatver and make a little gusset of glue on either side of the joint. I know that it's not _supposed_ to be strong on end grain but in small sections that's strong enough to hold fins on rockets (there's as much area in the gussets as there is in the contact surface) and should be plenty to hold things together until you get the paneling or planking on the walls. Bond the top and bottom planks and you're essentially using them as reinforcing plates which should hold the joints together just fine.
Beyond that, you might want to find the nearest hobby shop that specializes in radio controlled airplanes and find out what those guys are using these days.
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Cyanoacrylate. Pretty much standard for model building these days.

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wrote:

I have a question, how are you going to space the 2x4,s a jig? If you do not have to adjust CA would be good, but then what do you make the jig out of UHMW? You could also make long wall sections then cut them to fit with a jig right.
Do not forget the wind braces. :)
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
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Probably a UHMW plastic, yes. I've got plenty around here, as a friend dropped a bundle off when he moved up north a few years ago.
Inlet bracing. You know, I need to study that one: I'm pretty sure it was used, but back in those days, they mostly used balloon framing, and it has been a LONG time since I've even seen a diagram.
I started out thinking I'd make it brick, but then realized back in Victorian days, very little brick veneer was used. Solid brick construction on a large dollhouse might well be a ticket to the nuthouse. Make or buy the bricks and then pretend you're a miniature mason. I think not. There will be enough work with tweezers anyway.
This dollhouse is going to be an immense amount of work before I even start cutting wood, but plans and a jig or two will make it easily repeatable.
By the time I get it finished, I may have a great-granddaughter ready for it, though right now that's almost totally wish with no factual back-up.
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Sat, Jan 20, 2007, 4:59am (EST-3): snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (CharlieSelf) doth query: Has anyone built a dollhouse using a stick-built frame? <snip> Epoxy? Expensive, but workable. Short brads? <snip>
Hiya Charlie. Haven't done one myself, but have seen realistic examples, about like shrunk buildings. They always used short, thin, brads, just like as if they'd been a regular size. Course they weren't for a lot of handling, just display. If what yer doin' is gonna be handled or played with, might want some Titebond in there too. Otherwise, I'd sau just brads.
JOAT Bugrit. Millennium hand AND shrimp.
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construction
a plug

method for

brads?
methods.
be fun to

Charlie,
Basswood is the way to go for this type of project. Even in small stips it's relatively stable, works easily, sands smooth, and takes a decent finish. It's all I use, except for the hardwood dowels for the masts and spars, for ship building.
Many of the tools used by "plank-on-frame" model ship builders are also useful for constructing "stick built" doll houses. Micro-Mark (http://www.micro-mark.com ) has a fair, but my no means complete, assortment of these. Check the model ship building sites for other ideas.
At Micro-Mark the general Model Ship area is at:
http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares.asp?MerchantID=RET01229&Acti ontalog&Typepartment&ID5
These Plank-on-Frame Clamps work very well on thin material:
http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares.asp?MerchantID=RET01229&Acti ontalog&Type=Product&ID`926
Some folks use the smaller of these Mini-Nails to give the appearance they are holding things together. Personally I don't, as in the era I usually model pegs were used.:
http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares.asp?MerchantID=RET01229&Acti ontalog&Typepartment&ID0
If you do use the Mini-Nails one of these might be handy. Push-Hammers for Mini-Nails:
http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares.asp?MerchantID=RET01229&Acti ontalog&Typepartment&ID
And you'll definately want some of this Watch Crystal Cement if you'll be "glazing" your windows with clear plastic. Unlike CA and styrene cements, the fumes will not cause the plastic to fog:
http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares.asp?MerchantID=RET01229&Acti ontalog&Type=Product&ID343
You should also check out Black Bear Construction Co. for "stick built" wood model construction tools and as a source of scale sized basswood "dimensional" lumber.
Tools are at: http://www.blackbearcc.com/Tools.htm
Wood is at: http://www.blackbearcc.com/wood2.htm
Or you could go directly to the source for model building basswood. The list of what's available is at. Note the various types of flooring and siding available:
http://www.midwestproducts.com/catalog_sa1.asp?srch_grp_id=8&sa1_ id&sa2_id&
Back up one level if you want to check out their walnut, cherry, etc., selections.
Have fun,
Len
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Sounds fascinating. What scale would you be using? I sure would like to see pictures of the progress. What would you use for the wood lath? And the plaster?
Max
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I'm not sure it's going to happen, at least as a framed dollhouse. I spent a day cutting enough wood to frame one end (small) wall. And I mean a day! About seven hours.
I wouldn't live long enough to finish the thing. Scale of whatever design I choose is going to be standard 1"=11.
And it's materials, and the requisite techniques, such as wood lath and plaster that are causing the final idea slippage. The wood lath is probably no harder than cutting siding, but the plaster...hell, it's nearly impossible to find someone who knows how to plaster a full sized wall these days. Figuring out what to use and how to use it for a tiny wall is a good way to reduce your entire vocabulary to two or three gibberish words.
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Charlie Self wrote:
| I'm not sure it's going to happen, at least as a framed dollhouse. I | spent a day cutting enough wood to frame one end (small) wall. And I | mean a day! About seven hours. | | I wouldn't live long enough to finish the thing. Scale of whatever | design I choose is going to be standard 1". | | And it's materials, and the requisite techniques, such as wood lath | and | plaster that are causing the final idea slippage. The wood lath is | probably no harder than cutting siding, but the plaster...hell, it's | nearly impossible to find someone who knows how to plaster a full | sized | wall these days. Figuring out what to use and how to use it for a | tiny | wall is a good way to reduce your entire vocabulary to two or three | gibberish words.
Hmm - and weren't they still using cut nails in the 1890's? <vbeg>
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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Oh, yeah. I've forgotten the general cut-off date, but the '90s sounds like an era where there were mixed types.
Another point, too, is I don't really think I want to deal with framing miniature roofs on some of those Victorian tower concepts. Today, you can't hire a slate roofer, in most places, who can deal with the full-sized versions. That's not nearly as difficult as framing the thing.
My wife's cousin, who is a successful upscale building contractor, notes that there's really nothing difficult about building today's homes: they're all based on the 90 deg. angle. As were the Victorian homes, but inside, and out, the square got tossed for the protractor and compass, with lots of round work.
My vestigial math skills went and hid as soon as I considered that.
Maybe Craftsman style?
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