Formica

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Years ago I rolled up a 4x8 ft piece of Formica and stored it in my garage. I found out recently that there was a set in it that refused to come out. I tried wetting the back and laying on my patio with weights on for days. I even tried using my heat gun on. It didn't help a bit. Any solutions?
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Glue it down.
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On 11/21/2015 7:55 AM, Leon wrote:

I did that with one piece. It wasn't warped too bad. I made a rig where I could hold it and place it where it needed to go. This stuff I have left has a 8" radius curve to it. oh well...
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On 11/21/2015 10:03 AM, gray_wolf wrote:

It is a wonder that it did not break with that tight of radius if you did not use a heat gun to wind it that tightly.
Also, wetting any plastic laminate is not going to aid in forming it. It is water proof.
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gray_wolf wrote:

If what you have left is 8" long you may have a problem. If it is 8' long, you don't.
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On 11/21/2015 7:55 AM, Leon wrote:

+1
Use the original (not the new waterbase and I'm presuming can still obtain it; been a _long_ time since I've done any laminate, like 15 yr) contact cement as it's stickier imo altho probably can get by otherwise.
Just to be comfortable, I'd plan on a sheet of 3/4 ply over the surface with some weight for 24 hr afterwards altho if you get a good bond and roll it well it should be fine.
--






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On 11/21/2015 10:16 AM, dpb wrote:

How about some cauls?<g>
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In this application, the 3/4 ply _is_ a caul. Oh noes! We've violated Electric Comet's definition of caul! Who'd have thought a caul could be 4 feet wide, 8 feet long, and only 3/4 inch thick, with no curve!
John
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On 11/21/2015 10:58 AM, John McCoy wrote:

No problem, just leave it out on your deck through a rainstorm or two. That'll put a curve on it!<g>
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On 11/21/2015 12:09 PM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

No it won't. Formica is a plastic laminate. It's not wood.
--
Jeff

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On 11/21/2015 11:47 AM, woodchucker wrote:

Read it again, Jeff. I was referring to putting a curve to the caul, the 3/4" plywood<g>
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On Saturday, November 21, 2015 at 9:47:42 AM UTC-8, woodchucker wrote:

Well, that's half-true. It's phenolic plastic lamination from plies of paper and resin. So, in a period of months, the water content might migrate inside the wood-fiber-paper material, and swell some of the fibers to make a curve. The 'glue it to something flat' solution will work fine, and a few years of staying flat will keep it that shape, even if termites eat the substrate from under it.
The strongest phenolic plastics are laminated with linen cloth instead of paper. I'm thinking of using that for building a plane (also requires the right shape of tuit).
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On 11/22/2015 1:43 PM, whit3rd wrote:

Yeah if the laminate absorbs water, for what every reason, you should throw it away. If it absorbs water it is worthless.

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wrote:

The back side of Formica (or any other brand of "laminate" contertop material) WILL absorb water, and it WILL warp towards the finished side if left in a high humidity environment for a prolonged period of time. The melamine top surface is virtually impermeable - not so the back side.
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On 11/23/2015 1:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yeah, the back side of the laminate is textured to add more bite and that may appear to absorb water but it will not penetrate. If that were the case, water based adhesives would do work well with plastic laminates. FWIW I have worked with plastic laminates for a very long time and have never ever witnessed it warping toward the finished side regardless of reason.
You mention melamine, is typically not sold a plastic laminate by itself unless buying trims strips. It is most always bought with a thick wood material subsurface. That will warp with water.
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wrote:

I have several pieces of Arborite - same thing as Formica - that is curled akmost into a "C" shape from sitting out in the weather. It came off of the manufactured lumber backing it had been fastened to sitting out behind the shop, and it is now curled pretty badly. Was on a cheam'n'nasty pallet)
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Not sure where you are going with that but like plywood the sides will expand and contract at different rates if one side is exposed to a different temp.
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From Formica's information on the internet at: http://www.formica.com/ca/~/media/north-america/documents/products/en/shared/ftb_0836_tb_laminate_postforming_en.pdf
Postforming grade laminate is hygroscopic; that is, it is capable of losing or absorbing moisture from the atmosphere. Therefore, if it is exposed to dry air conditions, a loss of moisture can result that adversely affects its postforming properties. To assure proper postforming performance, Formica® Brand postforming grade laminate should be preconditioned prior to use for at least 48 hours at 70°F (21°C) and 50% relative humidity. Small shop areas can be economically humidified with portable humidifier units. Larger areas may require specific recommendations from an HVAC equipment supplier. Remember, when seasonal changes approach, preconditioning practices should be observed to maintain consistent postforming conditions inside the shop, regardless of the atmospheric conditions outside. This is especially important during winter months, when dry air conditions often exist
Straight from the horse's mouth, so to speak. If it is hygroscopic and absorbs moisture it only stands to reason that it could warb prom differential expansion - no??
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On 11/24/2015 6:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I suppose anything is possible. But is all plastic laminate considered postforming?
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wrote:

If it can be used for things that are not flat, it is postformable. I imagine there is non postformable formica - but the "form" in "formica" WAS because it was "formable"
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