Food safe glue followup

Page 1 of 2  
After the recent thread on food safe glue, I emailed Gorilla Glue and asked. They replied with a detailed message. Essentially, they said that while they haven't gone through the FDA approval process, it is already in use in Denmark making things like cutting boards and such. They go on to say it is completely non-toxic after curing. The only caveat is that if subjected to temperatures over 212F for over 4 hrs (at a time) may lead to joint failure once cooled.
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Which one of the Gorilla Brand glues are you talking about?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The standard Gorilla Glue and the fast cure, not the super glue, or the wood glue.
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That would be the polyurethane, I presume...
There are similar urethane glues that are FDA approved for indirect contact; I'd no qualms w/ any of them.
I didn't see the earlier thread so not sure what was indicated, but the Type-I and Type-II water-resistant glues such as Titebond II and III are also on the approved list.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, polyurethane glue. I think the significant factor in the previous discussion was water*proof*. I don't trust Titebond (type 1, 2, or 3) to go through the dishwasher.
Ed
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
...

No, even ANSI Type I (Titebond "III") isn't rated for extreme immersion. (It's easy to get cornfoozed between the numbers as the Type I test Standard is the more severe while Titebond introduced their Type II before Type III, I being implicitly already taken by the existing "yellow" woodworkers glue)
I'd not count too much on the urethanes for long-term survival dishwasher use but they've a better chance and should last somewhat longer. If it's only a breadboard or somesuch w/o a lot of heavy effort in the construction, sure. Fancy multi-blank turned salad bowls or somesuch, I'd hate to risk the effort.
all imo, $0.02, ymmv, etc., etc., etc., ..., of course... :)
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article <3107e2be-f490-432e-b744-f87df30c3da9@

No, well .... anybody who puts wooden cooking utensils into a dishwasher deserves a spanking i.m.o. anyway. Brief immersion in hand-hot soapy water is one thing, the extremes of the dishwasher environment are something else entirely. In fact I'd trust few if any woods nor finishes to stand up to that abuse for very long in any event. My sister-in-law's knife handles bear witness to what I'm saying. A sorry warped, twisted, buckled and clattering (e.g. loose rivets) mess. <shudders>
Incidentally, one glue I haven't seen mentioned here is the old Aerolite 308 which is one of the most temperature/water resistant glues I've used. Not sure about food-save approval, it does contain formaldehyde to start with. I used to use it for kitchen benches and tables that would get wet and hot-wet and were only finished with oils ...
-P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I agree with you... but...
I bought my wife a knife set with wood handles (Chicago Cutlery) shortly after we were married (1975) I recently retired and started doing things like emptying the dishwasher which I never did before and to my horror, I found she was putting these superb knives with wooden handles in the washer. Of course I complained about it and she said she has always done it with no ill effects. There have been no ill effects, the handles never had finish on them but they are in great shape after I guess 32 + years. No warpage, no loose rivets, etc. I have no idea what type of wood it is either, and I still shudder to think about putting anything wood in the dishwasher but had to mention this.
--
Jack
Using FREE News Server: http://Motzarella.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jack Stein wrote:

Walnut.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Morris Dovey wrote:

I think you're right, but whatever, this knife set has been through the mill for more than 35 years. Not too much has survived all these years.
We bought a 100 year old round oak table at a house auction that I refinished and it seats 12 with all the boards in. Wife paid $100 for that which I complained about... boy was I dumb...
We bought a used set of Sears oak bedroom furniture from a guy that was obviously and admittedly selling while his recent X was at work, still in good shape... and all my early 50's Rockwell Delta big iron stationary tools, in about brand new condition (worlds biggest gloat, everyone would hate me if I were to tell that tale). Not much else I can think of is still around, other than us, and we are starting to wear around the edges...
--
Jack
Using FREE News Server: http://Motzarella.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I hand clean our knives just because they seems to get dinged up in the washer.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 13 Jan 2009 13:59:22 -0500, Jack Stein wrote:

Same story, same knives, but purchased about 5 years earlier. They seem to be indestructible.
When I use one, I rinse it off by hand :-).
--
It's turtles, all the way down

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I saw a show in which the chef kept a pot of boiling water constantly on the stove with a strainer basket. When he cut meat, he would set the knife in the boiling water for a short time, before wiping it and replacing it in the rack.
If you're going to hand wash after meat, make sure you clean with an antimicrobial soap.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 13 Jan 2009 18:54:50 -0600, -MIKE- wrote:

NO, NO, NO, NO, NO! All that stuff does is breed stronger bacteria. It should be taken off the market.
Besides, I was 9 or 10 before antibiotics became available and I drank water out of the Ohio River before they cleaned it up. My immune system hasn't yet seen a digestive system bug it couldn't lick with one hand tied behind its back :-).
BTW, when the antibiotics (penicillin) did come out, I was allergic to it.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry Blanchard wrote:

Ok, forget I wrote "antimicrobial soap."
If you're going to hand wash cutting knives after meat, make sure you clean them with something that will adequately disinfect them.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote: ...

No, even ANSI Type I (Titebond "III") isn't rated for extreme immersion. (It's easy to get cornfoozed between the numbers as the Type I test Standard is the more severe while Titebond introduced their Type II before Type III, I being implicitly already taken by the existing "yellow" woodworkers glue)
No kidding, the test never mentions Water Proof in the body of the description of the test, only in the title. Talk about deceptive claims.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I really don't think I would trust any wood to go through the dish washer. It is bound to swell, shrink, and eventually split. the glue will probably be only 1 of the problems going on inside a dishwasher.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'll buy that. But in my experience, woodworkers don't load all the dishwashers in the world. I'm going to assume the worst and go for the best glue going. (grin)
I've used Gorilla glue for a couple small boats I've made. The glue joints never fail. The paint does and then the wood does but that glue will hold those broken pieces of wood together forever.
I wouldn't use it for every job but where I expect immersion in water, it is generally my choice. It's good to know that it is safe for kitchen use.
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 12 Jan 2009 13:27:03 -0500, "Ed Edelenbos"

While not a test for being "non-toxic," I look at the list of ingrediants and look for any toxic elements. Some glues contain arsenic. Of course, burning a non-toxic compound yields all sorts of complex compounds--which might kill a pet bird or make a human sick.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

LOL... I use cedar boards for cooking salmon now and then (they don't get so hot they burn and not glued up pieces) but I can't imagine making a glued up baking dish. The only times I could imagine a glued up piece being at 212F (hmmm... what's significant about that number?) would be a glued up piece as a spoon used to stir something on a stove, or maybe as a rack in a boil pot or a steamer.
I'm sure there was some test requirement that produces these results. I just can't imagine (me at least) subjecting things to the extremes lots of these tests go to. I don't know, maybe there isn't a lick of common sense left in the world.
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.