Folding Chair pics, especially for CSonny

Two years ago I went to the Old-Tyme Music Festival in Great Plains, MO and returned here describing a folding chair I saw there. CSonny, and some others, expressed some interest in the chair at that time, so I went back last weekend and returned with pictures this time. No one present would take credit for building the chair I found (they were using it), but they allowed me to take pictures. When I first saw it two years ago, 3 different models of the chair were being sold--a "double-wide" and a "rocker", IIRC, in addition to one like the one in my photos.
http://web.newsguy.com/MySite/FoldingChair/chair.htm
Maybe it's a familiar design (but, it's not to me)? I hope you like it. Someone used their noodle in coming up with the design...
Cheers, Bill
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On Friday, June 27, 2014 1:25:24 AM UTC-5, Bill wrote:

Thanks Bill. Interesting. I'll study the photos more closely.
Sonny
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Sonny wrote:

You're welcome, Sonny. The Grizzly store in Springfield was less than 2 miles off of the highway too...a lot of cool toys! : )
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On Thursday, June 26, 2014 11:25:24 PM UTC-7, Bill wrote:

Would have been best to get a good side shot while it was fully open and also half folded so you could easily see the configuration. I suppose it can be reverse engineered from the front picks but not as easily.
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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

If I had posted a SU drawing, there wouldn't be any fun left. ; ) It's all there.... My wife used her camera. It was hard enough to get her to do what she did! Bear in mind, she didn't know what she was supposed to be taking pictures of. : )
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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

He can get them in two years time when he goes next.
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F Murtz wrote:

I haven't heard any other music lover's pipe-up about going! Admission is free. I mainly go to hear old time fiddle, and Grizzly (Springfield, MO) is only 2 miles off the interstate about 50 miles away.
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Looks like a TV dinner tray that somebody added a back to.
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Bob La Londe wrote:

Notice that all of the pieces rotate about one central "spindle".
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you should have put a pair of shoes on the chair : )
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ChairMan wrote:

I showed her our comments. She said that a puppy or a handmade guitar on it would have gotten me better pictures.
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Not correct. What appears to be one spindle all of the way through is actually cut in two places. This allows the legs to fold out in a "sawhorse" type of action, or like a big x. That is a small detail that is the key to the design.
The seat portion is actually in two pieces, and forms only when the x is brought into its open position, and the back half of the seat is rotated up.
What would have been most valuable, is a video of the opening and closing sequence in addition to the pictures. Next year perhaps? <g>
I will probably try to duplicate this in the next couple months, but do not have time to try at the moment. Very clever design.
--
Jim in NC


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Morgans wrote:

Thank you for your analysis. As no one is trying to keep it a secret, I'm surprised the design is not more well-known. If nothing more, I've proved that I actually saw the chair I described 2 years ago! Maybe not as clearly as you see it.... : ) By the way, opening and closing the chair is practically effortless, as it should be. However, it is not what I would call light-weight. I think it's heavier than it appears.
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well if shoes don't do it for her, you got a keeper then <bg>
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I thought about the weight, too. It does look very heavy.
I think the big attractiveness is that it is cheap (compared to folding metal chairs) and easy to build. Also very stackable. I can imagine 6 or so guys getting together and building a few hundred of those in a day or two... If they did some good production techniques, and had the room for all of the stock. Just what you need if you are putting on a music festival or something like that.
--
Jim in NC


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After looking at it again, the break in the central axle is after the 3rd member counting from the outsides. The 4th and 5th members are then on their own axle that is one piece.
The back portion of the seat sliding forward against the front part of the seat is also what keeps the "x" from spreading out too far when you sit on it. Really clever.
--
Jim in NC


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Morgans wrote:

So that "handle" on the back of the chair is helping to hold the whole contraption together (without it, the chair would fall apart?)
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I wouldn't say that. Most all of the pieces have stiffness that keep things pulled together. Also, down lower than the main top axle, there is a dowel that holds the pivot where the x of the legs are formed. That in turn holds the split in the main axle together, and provides most of the missing strength lost at the split.
--
Jim in NC


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Morgans wrote:

I think I almost get it. Please post some decent pics after you build one! : )
Bill
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This is essentially a small folding rendezvous table that has two outside members added to the central shaft. The backrest is attached to one end of these members, and a cross bar to the other. You unfold the table and then the backrest is raised into place. The crossbar rests against the lower part of the X legs, hitting just past true vertical so the backrest leans back a bit. These tables are very handy. I have one that also has a folding bottom shelf and a couple others that double as footrests or water cooler stands.
Here's a link for the table plans. Just add the backrest assembly and Bob's your uncle. Popular Woodworking and/or Wood also published an article and plans a few years back.
http://paleotool.com/plans-projects-and-patterns/furniture/
For many years slat tables and chairs like the one seen in Bill's first picture were made at a school for the handicapped in Missouri. I still have one table and two chairs made at this school 30 years ago. The slat construction is not authentic according to most sources I have seen, but they do make great plate drying racks.
Regards, Roy

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