Flooring Q

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I am curious if anyone has put vinyl plank flooring over osb.
Recently we removed sheet vinyl from two rooms to find it was laid over osb and not glued down. It was there for almost twenty years, flat as a board and no issues. I was surprised it wasn't glued. Since the subfloor seems like new, I am trying to decide if it really needs any further underlayment.
Thoughts on this?
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Contact the manufacturer and see what they have to say. Only their response will be the one that matters.
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:pts of "floating" solid vinyl flooring out there, as well as perimeter glued - but OSB has enough "texture" to it that it could "telegraph" through and show. As said - check with the manufacturer of the new flooring. Possibly, with a new floating floor, just a layer of the very thin high density foam used as an underlay for laminate would do the job???
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I get the 'contact manufacturer' thing...
My rooms came with sheet vinyl over OSB. It was installed in the plant; no brand name given.
Due to very low door frames, I can't put down thick plywood and then flooring. I might be able to do 1/4" ply but some floating floors come with a pre-attached underlayment that could make it too thick. Only thing under the carpeting is typical carpet foam over OSB.
Thanks for the replies.
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On Mon, 13 Jul 2015 13:33:57 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

Where are you buying your vinyl flooring to get 1/4 to 3/8 inch thick??? My premium solid vinyl sheet flooring is MABEE 65 thou thick. The new "premium" vinyl snap or edge=glued flooring that looks like hardwood or tile MIGHT be 1/8" thick. That dougle layer product would not likely telegraph, but I know from experience the .065 solid vinyl sheet flooring can!!!
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I'm not buying anything to get thick. I am trying to find out how much an underlayment would raise other types of flooring up. The total height of any flooring, with or without underlayment is something I need to know before I choose and buy.
I want to do this myself but I am not familiar with installation of sheet flooring and don't want to pay someone else to install it.
Ergo maybe vinyl planks that I can self install and save.
No help fo this job. It's all me, myself and I.
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wrote:

The new "luxury vinyl" plank and tile look-alike flooring is not terribly thick and can be self-installed - but costs significantly more than sheet vinyl - mighr be cheaper to pay an installer than to buy the more expensive product - - - -
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I am finding relatively decent prices on LVP on th einternet but I need to see it in person and know where it is manufactured.
I may very well go with sheet vinyl and a pro install. That would mean I would have to find a really good local professional installer. Reason follows...
Same friend I mentioned earlier went with a local place to lay sheet in his guest bath and bedroom. You can see and feel every nail, bump, etc., everywhere. A week later he showed it to me and I told him that was a bad install, not counting the damage to his bathroom walls. He called the place and they were completely gone. Out of business.
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wrote:

THAT is telegraphing. Sheet flooring WILL show every imperfection - which is why I would NOT use it directly over OSB. Preparation is key. Using a floor leveler product on the osb - basically like a real thick paint or thin cement- to get rid of the texture first would eliminate the need for a thick "underlay" - That's what a "professional" is for.
I only deal with companies that have been around for a good while and have a stellar reputation if I'm paying them to do a job. If I'm just buying product and installing it myself the company I'm buying from is less important than the material I'm buying from them (brand and quality)
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You are correct. I am looking for a DiY product that is durable, water-resistant and won't be too high to force me to do other modifications in the house as a result.
A friend has a Pergo laminate in thier kitchen and a 125 gallon turtle tank across the room. Every month they refresh the water by running hoses across the floor to drain and refill the tank. I have been watching the laminate peel more and more at the corners and bubble up in areas. I think that flooring was a bad choice for a kitchen. Just saying what I am seeing.
If I can't find a suiatable DiY alternative, I will probably have more solid sheet vinyl reinstalled professionally. Since the plan is to do the entire house, I was hoping to save the labor cost with DiY.
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On 7/14/2015 1:52 PM, Casper wrote:

Big budget choice would be ceramic tile. Lesser budget is vinyl sheet. OSB sub-floor may not be suitable for ceramic though.
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For an experienced DIYer Ceramic isn't that much more than GOOD vinyl. costwise. A bit more work though.
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I've done tile and don't want it here.
I want this floor both level and the same across the entire house. Tile would be too cost and labor intesive.
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My friend's house came with the Pergo.
As for me, I don't want tile. Not on the kitchen floor.
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On 7/15/2015 10:48 AM, Casper wrote:

Your choice, of course. Had it in my last house, eventually will have it in this house. Very easy to keep clean, never needs wax or special products.
Both bathrooms and the downstairs hallway are 12 x 12 tiles with epoxy grout.
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FWIW, I agree with you. We have a hardwood kitchen floor in this house and would *greatly* prefer tile. Anywhere there is water I'd prefer tile over any other surface.

Not sure I want it in the hallway but if "downstairs" = "basement", I agree.
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The "hallway" in our house is the front foyer. Nothing better than porcelain tile for that job - or kitchen or bath. Main floor "powder room" and kitchen in our house are solid vinyl sheet flooring - about 15 years old and just like new. Living and dining room are ash prefinished hardwood. Upstairs bath is a laminate product that looks and feels like ceramic or porcelain tile, comes in 1X2 foot sections that click together, and the joints are wax sealed so the finished floor is waterproof. Bedrooms are original narrow strip oak hardwood. Upstairs hallway and stairs are carpetted. I'd rather have them harswood too, but carpet is safer on the stairs.\
Basement rec room is 14mm laminate. Laundry/office is Berber carpet, along with basement steps. I would never install the cheap polypropylene Berber again - drag anything across it and you have a melted streak that never comes out.
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On Wed, 15 Jul 2015 22:32:34 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Agreed. Anywhere water...

Agreed for everything but vinyl. Hate the stuff. I have two bathrooms and a laundry that are vinyl. I have plans to replace them with tile. The vinyl in the laundry is torn (washer or drier caught it at some point). As far as I'm concerned DIY tile is time consuming but not all that difficult. It's cheaper than vinyl, too.

Laminate on a concrete floor? Below grade? My basement floor is concrete and sawdust. ;-)
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The laminate is on a 1/2" plywood subfloor supported on treated 5/4 strapping laid on 30 lb felt on the concrete floor. Was originally carpetted. Basement is heated/conditioned like the rest of the house - no door between basement and main floor, just like between main and upper. Humidity is always a wee bit higher in the basement. Currently 40% at 25C.
The basement carpet is on the same plywood raised floor. The raised floor is over 40 years old and standing up well.
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On 7/15/2015 8:26 PM, krw wrote:

I have a raised ranch and this is on the concrete on the lower level. Hall goes from the family room to what is my office on the other end, stairs and bathroom in between. Originally it had horrible indoor/outdoor carpet, then engineered hardwood that got wet a couple of times.
Upstairs hall is carpet.
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