First try with miter lock bit

I bought this Miter Lock bit last winter but today was the first time I actualy used it. I had to make a bigger hole in the router table insert, but no problem there! :)
Anyways, I got it set up according to a handout I got at a Woodcraft demo, using 1/2" oak. the last pieces were perfect, so they'll be my future setup pieces for 1/2".
I then proceeded to make a 4" square box with some more oak. I did get a couple of panels wrong and made a couple of new ones. When I finally assembled the box, the corners weren't as good and tight as the samples. Something must have crept a litle between the first and last pieces.
This could actually be for some nice easy Xmas gifts, if I can "perfect" that joint. Wooden banks fo the kids, etc.
John
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With a little practice getting it perfect is easy. The hard part is not destroying it while putting clamps on; they are pretty brittle until the glue sets up.
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If you do it right glue isn't even needed.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/LockMiter/LockMiterBox1.html
Stock has to be flat and all the corners of the parts cut square. Sides must be exaclty the same dimensions and the top and bottom must fit exactly.
Bit must be set so that when you make the cuts where the part is held vertically you don't remove the outside edge (the one down on the table)
Any bit slip or fence movement will blow the fit.
charlie b
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wrote:

Very cool and well documented!
Thanks, TWS
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Darn You! Now I have to go and spend an hour or two one night this week, making my own lock miter box. Actually, I have a christmas present I am making which requires me to get the bit set up anyway, so doing this sounds like a fun distraction along the way!
Joe in Denver my woodworking website: http://www.the-wildings.com/shop /

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Simple miters with keys turned out to be much less fussy for my box making. After I used some of JOAT's research on setting up the bit, I sent it back to its owner, and decided on other joinery.
If I can't get something right, that's supposed to make my life easier, after an hour or so, I reexamine my approach, and my motivation.
On the other hand, these handcut dovetails.....
Patriarch
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Can this bit be used on end grain? At the Detroit Woodworking show last Friday, I was viewing a demo of this bit, but the rep said the bit can only be used along the length of the board. If used across the end grain it will splinter and make a mess out the the end of the board. So I didn't buy one as I wanted to use it to join the corners of small boxes - like jewelry boxes.
Rich Durkee
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Use sacrificial wood ahead of and behind the stock. This is the only way I've managed to get a decent cut on end grain.
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One other thing I found with this bit. I used a router speed control from HF as I've read that it must run under 10K rpm. Well, experimenting, I found that full speed it will burn the oak a bit, but just a little less speed was perfect.
As for end grain, it is hard to do, but you do the end grain first, then along the grain. You can also follow it with a backer block like using a regular router bit on end grain, and also cut a 45 degree angle (but but not to the finish size) to make it easier to cut. It does chip a good bit in end grain, but, it may not be visible in a finished joint.
John
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RJDurkee wrote:

Forgot to include the url to the two shop made jigs which help control the stock and minimizes tear out at the end of the cut. (all one line so watch the line wrap)
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/SharpeningCenter/SharpeningCenter5.html
And as noted already, do the end grain first.
BTW - a zero clearance fence insert also helps. These are fair sized bits and they WILL pull stock into them at the beginning of a pass IF you don't go with a zero clearance bit opening.
charlie b
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Bull dunkey. It is meant for end grain. It will spinter like any board when not properly setup and backed.
Lock miter bit has become one of my favorites now that I know how tyo set up/ http://www.woodshopdemos.com/cmt-lm5.htm
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On 06 Dec 2004 22:36:19 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (JLucas ILS) wrote:

I like this technique. Set the height first using two pieces flipped (the error is easy to measure and compensate) then set the fence. I assume the fence adjustment uses essentially the same technique.
Thanks, good explanation, well appreciated. TWS
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