First time using tung oil

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Paul
"Larry W" < snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org> wrote in message
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Re: Rockler's Tung Oil
That is really tung oil. http://www.rockler.com/tech/RTD20000304AA.pdf . Most of the "tung oil finishes" are some other oil / varnish / thinner blend to give a tung oil "effect". Not that most people know what a tung oil finish looks like.
Be warned that raw oil finishes are slow drying. Tung oil may be faster than the others, but depending on temperature and humidity you are talking a week or two to appear to be dry and two weeks to a month to be really dry. By dry I mean fully cured by reacting with oxygen to polymerize.
By the way, you do know that if you wad your rags up and throw them in the garbage, the reaction of the oil with oxygen can start a fire? I wash my rags out with solvent and then spread them out somewhere to dry.

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wrote:

I hope you spread them out somewhere where they won't burn your house down if that method fails.
If you're rinsing them for re-use either you use a lot of oil finish or you are awfully cheap!
Somewhere back in the Google archives of this newsgroup there is an article by a fellow who used to hang his rags on the clothesline to dry. One day one caught fire.
He probably didn't rinse them first, but still...
The common instructions for disposal call for sealing the rag in a metal container, like an old paint can that is partially filled with water. You can keep doing that until the can is full of rags then toss it in the trash.
Once the rags are hard and stiff the danger of spontaneous combustion is past.
An alternative is to deliberately burn them, if you have a safe place to do that.
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Squozen nuts.
http://www.rockler.com/tech/RTD20000304AA.pdf
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

How do you figure that? Linseed oil is is squished out of flax seeds, tung from tung nuts.
Maybe you meant that BLO is raw linseed oil with driers? True. But it can be made without driers too.
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dadiOH
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wrote:

Perhaps he was overcome by epoxy fumes.

If so, that's the type which takes forever to finish polymerizing and dry/harden. Ghastly stuff.
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On Thu, 3 Nov 2011 21:27:00 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

The latter is why I plonked him six months ago. Talk about OCD...
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"dadiOH" wrote:

Try your basic brain fart.
Was thinking about "raw" oil, tung or linseed, that takes forever to dry while BLO contains driers which makes it workable and BTW, makes it one of my favorite finishes.
Lew
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Raw linseed oil is used by artists, who want as much working time as possible, several days, usually. If you really want a fast drying linseed oil, Tru-Oil gunstock oil is impossible to beat. Two hours between coats. Full cure takes less than a week. Builds almost as fast as varnish.
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Paul
"SonomaProducts.com" < snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
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That's good also. Kind of oversold on the durability even after fully cured but a good finish none the less. I try really hard to get my film finishes thin and dulled to look much like an oiled finish but with a little better durability only needing wax for the rest of their life. True oil finishes should be renewed every year or two.
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Excessive oil can seep back from pores, causing many of the same problems. Apply light coats and wipe back thoroughly.
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Mineral spirits or turpentine, depending on whichever smell you can best tolerate. Denatured EtOH won't cut oil-based finishing products, just makes them precipitate out into useless clumps.
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