Finishes

Learning as I go along and heed advice from many fine crafters in here, I arise upon a very minor issue. I made a few projects using my black walnut and used tung oil as a finish/stain. I know many people have used tung oil and nothing more. After a few days of application, the wood still feels a bit oily to the touch. Is this common and will it dry completely or should I put another finish such as Shellac, Lacquer, Poly, etc. to coat over it?
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/7/2016 4:51 PM, Meanie wrote:

Tung takes a long time to dry. I hope you wiped off the excess. It will eventualy dry.
No you can't topcoat it with Shellac, or Lacquer, until it is dry. An oil based poly I am not sure about. I don't use Tung any longer, and never liked Poly except in some extreme circumstances.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 07/07/2016 3:51 PM, Meanie wrote:

Which tung oil product in particular did you use? If it was one of the pure oils w/o any driers, it may take a couple of weeks minimum if you didn't thin it.
Rub it out with just a little on a rag to keep it where it will move, not stick and keep rubbing down frequently will help some.
But, w/o the driers it's a _slow_ process; humidity will only prolong (altho it doesn't really "dry" in the sense of evaporation, it form polymer cross-links and cures.
--





Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It will eventually dry assuming you wiped off all you could when you applied it. If you didn't it will still dry but will be gummy.
How many coats have you applied? Tung oil makes a decent finish but it requires multiple coats, multiple being 4 minimum (IMO) and as many as you care to apply to get the look you want.
"THEY" say you need to sand between coats and that it is dry enough to recoat when sanding produces a powder. I don't sand between coats unless there is an obvious spot that needs it, I wait two days before another coat.
"THEY" say to thin the first coat 1:1 oil:thinner but additional coats should be full strength. I thin 1:3, sometimes 1:4 for all coats; hell you want to wipe off as much as possible,why use full strength?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Interesting - I use linseed oil a lot more than Tung oil (I think I've only ever once used Tung oil), and I've never heard either of those two directives.
Needless to say, I don't sand and I don't thin. With linseed oil, at least, most of it soaks into the wood, so there's not that much to wipe off.
(I have heard it suggested that for open pore woods, oil and sanding to fill the grain is a viable technique).
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, July 7, 2016 at 6:02:29 PM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

Wow, nicely done! The whole tung oil story of application in a nutshell.
I love the reasoning on NOT using full strength... preach it!
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The writeup for using Epifanes spar varnish, intended for boat decks and spars, is useful. This varnish contains Tung oil, and a few other such things, in naptha (not water).
The intent is to fill the pores fairly deeply, ending up with smooth glossy surface with optical and physical depth. The dilute mix soaks in more deeply than full strength can.
.<http://www.epifanes.com
Joe Gwinn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am both lazy and frugal :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/8/2016 12:04 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Two more posts added (172 total) to the 'research notes' on your "book" on finishing. ;)
Your curator ...
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net https://www.google.com/+eWoodShop https://plus.google.com/+KarlCaillouet/posts http://www.custommade.com/by/ewoodshop/ https://www.facebook.com/eWoodShop-206166666122228 KarlCaillouet@ (the obvious)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, July 8, 2016 at 3:29:06 PM UTC-5, Swingman wrote:


Wow... I had no idea!
You know, one day I might just get those from you and put something togethe r. There always seems to be a need. I am working now to get a contract to oversee (schedule and consult) on a large remodel. I don't have the time to do it personally as I am covered with all the hail damage work I can do now.
But it is a nice job, and the painting contractors the client interviewed a re frankly, lost on refinishing. They know nothing about "industrial grade " enamels, little about prep, and their product knowledge is limited only t o their favorite supplier, which is most cases is Sherwin Williams because they have a free Keurig machine in every store.
The cabinet refinish (there are three wall to wall units that total about 4 0'X9, a bathroom vanity, and lot of kitchen cabs that are in the mix. The total overhaul on the cabinets finished the way they should be with new har dware installed will probably be about $20 - 25 thousand. They are all sol id white oak (oak ply carcass/shelves)from about 25 or more years ago, so i n my opinion worth saving. Due to the layout of the rooms, if new cabinets were to be made and installed, they would go back almost exactly the way t hey are now, just with lesser quality material and a three month wait time on the cabs themselves. They they would need to be installed and finished as well. Savings by refinishing is enormous, and the painter will be able to put a handful of cash in his pocket if he does it right.
Sadly, they hardly know where to start. I am negotiating with the client n ow to see if he wants me to write the specs and materials just for the refi nishing.
I am surrounded by latex slingers. Anything these guys know about oils, lo ng oils, enamels, deglossers, etc., is all folklore. What a shame. About ten years ago, Sherwin Williams gave FREE classes on how to use their produ cts, and fed you a hot dog at lunch, and an additional 10% off any industri al grade product you bought (in addition to your normal discount)for the ne xt 30 days.
They canceled <all> the classes because not enough people attended. Not ju st here, but wherever SW sells their products and has an industrial divisio n.
The thing that keeps me from putting my thoughts all in one basket is that while probably ten people on this earth would read it, at that rate it woul d be easier for them just to call me!
Although, one day you should show me those posts. I have kept exactly none of them.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Robert, As an old marketing research guy, I have an idea that I have actually seen done many years ago. If in fact, there is an "industrial" category, division, etc., there would be a great interest in getting word of that out. If you were to write something up in a digital format, think Kindle, you could put something together fairly quickly. It does not have to be a big book. In fact it could be deliberately small to "introduce the concept" The concept being there are other finishes in the world besides cheap latex. You could even have a humorous title about that, (Anything but Latex!)
It could even start a movement! Anything but Latex!
It then would become universally available, for a very reasonable price. If more info was required to cover any particular topic, then another volume could be made. Just sneak it out there, get a few good reviews and let the finish/paint company find out from the market. They will go to bat for you to promote the product. Even buy large quantities from you to sell/promote that industrial line.
I worked many years ago with a software coding guy who wrote a book that few people on the planet understood. He never sold a copy. He just sent it out everywhere to the heads of the coding departments of many companies. They took a look at it and decided that he knew what he was talking about. And they paid $2,000 a head to send their coders to his seminars. It was referred to as Expertise Marketing. You could even conduct a few seminars yourself. Maybe even do some things for the finish companies themselves. Real expertise, delivered in a folksy way is strong marketing. It would probable pay well too. (Although it probably could not compete with hail damage. ;-)
Think outside of the box Robert. You have the expertise. It is just a matter of figuring out how to capitalize on it.
My two cents, Lee
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/11/2016 4:06 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I've found myself talking clients out of new cabinets for that very reason.
Also, when I redid our lake house kitchen in AR, I decided to repair, rather than replace. No matter how much I tried I could not get anymore mileage with regard to usable space, and look and feel remained the same.

Seems we've really lost an entire generation of experienced based wisdom in SW stores in this neck of the woods. To the point I find myself going elsewhere.
Have to wait in line way too long just talk to some numbnut millennial, with no experience and with whom it is a tossup if they can even spell paint. AAMOF, the new "manager" of one of the SW stores, in a trendy location, is a young female, without a clue, but who fits right in with the local soccer moms looking for fashion advice in color choices.
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thank you gents.
I used 100% pure which I bought from Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000I1QA6E/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
I had a feeling about the humidity as it sat in for a few days and I did wipe the excess. I brought it into the house and I'll let it dry out completely.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

See below - quoted from the " Tech " link on this web page :
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p 049&cat=1,190,42942
Pure or Polymerized Unless you are finishing a food-contact item like a salad bowl or spoon, your choice should be polymerized tung. Not only does it dry much faster, but you can use it to create finishes that range from nearly matte to high luster.
John T.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I tried posting this the other day. I hope it goes through today.
"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.