Filling an imperfection

One of the maple boards on the buffet projects has a small imperfection. I t's a thin -- maybe 1/16th of an inch by 2 inch jagged scar that's about 1/ 16th of an inch deep. I recall reading that some folks fill such imperfect ions with CA glue. What's the process? What impact does this have on fini shing (assuming use of a wipe on oil-based finish)? Any other suggestions?
TIA
Larry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 28 Feb 2013 20:37:58 -0800 (PST), "Gramp's shop"

a thin -- maybe 1/16th of an inch by 2 inch jagged scar that's about 1/16th of an inch deep. I recall reading that some folks fill such imperfections with CA glue. What's the process? What impact does this have on finishing (assuming use of a wipe on oil-based finish)? Any other suggestions?
I'd suggest using one of these to fill your scar. I have a set and frequently use one of them to fill indentations larger than your 1/16" scar. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p 069&cat=1,190,42997
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, March 1, 2013 12:02:49 AM UTC-6, Upscale wrote:

use one of them to fill indentations larger than your 1/16" scar. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p 069&cat=1,190,42997
I picked up a set, plus some, of these wax sticks and other items, at a retired clock repairman's garage sale, for $2.
You can also use shellac or lacquer sticks, to fill those damages or imperfections. I've never used lacquer sticks, but have used shellac sticks, as I have a set, plus some, of these, also.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, February 28, 2013 10:02:49 PM UTC-8, Upscale wrote:

e boards on the buffet projects has a small imperfection. It's a thin -- ma ybe 1/16th of an inch by 2 inch jagged scar that's about 1/16th of an inch deep. I recall reading that some folks fill such imperfections with CA glue . What's the process? What impact does this have on finishing (assuming use of a wipe on oil-based finish)? Any other suggestions? I'd suggest using o ne of these to fill your scar. I have a set and frequently use one of them to fill indentations larger than your 1/16" scar. http://www.leevalley.com/ en/wood/page.aspx?p 069&cat=1,190,42997
Keep in mind wax\shellac types sticks are used AFTER you finish finishing. So they are used after you stain, and top coat. But before you wax (if you are waxing. The main reason is that no matter what you fill with, it will N OT stain or color that same from the top coat as the surrounding wood. It a lways looks different. So adding a filler after the fact lets you match the color more precisely. Also, if you have any other color differences or gra in patterns in the surrounding wood, you can modify the dent so it looks mo re like a natural anomily and then a fill with a liitle off color is OK.
Another approach is to do what is called a "dutchman" patch or repair. Goog le it. It is a sort of inlay method. You use the same wood to make a filler piece, cut a shallow mortise in a shape that follows grain lines and done well it ends up hiding well. Does take some talent. It can easily look much worse than the original problem but done well can be invisible. Again, dut chmen can be done to look like a natural anomily so exact match is not the goal. I have inlayed a knot before into pieces that have a few other knots already to hid a hammer ding.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

oogle it. It is a sort of inlay method. You use the same wood to make a fil ler piece, cut a shallow mortise in a shape that follows grain lines and do ne well it ends up hiding well. Does take some talent.
======== I'll say. a 1/16" X 1/16" 2" long dutchman wouldn't be for the inexperienced. First, cutting the receiving side correctly. Then making the one of a kind filler that is 1/16" x 1/16" to fit....
Then gluing it in to fit with no glue lines or "glue seal" from wiping away excess glue when finished....
Well beyond the skill set of anyone I know!
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, March 1, 2013 11:13:40 AM UTC-8, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
other approach is to do what is called a "dutchman" patch or repair. Google it. It is a sort of inlay method. You use the same wood to make a filler p iece, cut a shallow mortise in a shape that follows grain lines and done we ll it ends up hiding well. Does take some talent. ======== I'll say. a 1/16" X 1/16" 2" long dutchman wouldn't be for the inexperi enced. First, cutting the receiving side correctly. Then making the one of a kind filler that is 1/16" x 1/16" to fit.... Then gluing it in to fit wit h no glue lines or "glue seal" from wiping away excess glue when finished.. .. Well beyond the skill set of anyone I know! Robert
I agree it is not the easiest solution. Nothing says it has to stay that sm all either. Just laying out all possibilities. Honestly, I fix as many smal l problems with a sharpie, drawing in some grain, coloring a chipped out sp ot of finish, as I do with a chisel.
I have fixed crack like imperfections by cleaning, widening or lengthening them with a knife\ravor as needed, then tapping in some slivers of the same wood and planing them down by hand.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/1/2013 1:02 AM, Dave wrote:

It's a thin -- maybe 1/16th of an inch by 2 inch jagged scar that's about 1/16th of an inch deep. I recall reading that some folks fill such imperfections with CA glue. What's the process? What impact does this have on finishing (assuming use of a wipe on oil-based finish)? Any other suggestions?

I make lots of imperfections. Maybe I should just make the whole project out of that stuff?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Greg Guarino" wrote in message
On 3/1/2013 1:02 AM, Dave wrote:

LOL... glad I wasn't drinking my coffee. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gramp's shop wrote:

Can you turn the board over? If not, there are various ways to fill it. In no particular order...
1. Wax as Dave mentioned. Use after finishing; you can get the color close but probably not the sheen.
2. Stick shellac http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/Luthier/Technique/Finish/StickShellac/sticklac1.html
3. Sawdust and glue a) cyanoacrylate: fill with sanding and/or sawdust, apply CA so it wicks in, sand when dry (no odor up close), repeat as necessary. The filled area will always be dark.
b) white glue: make a thick paste of sanding and saw dust mixed with equal parts of glue and water, press in and over fill, let dry, sand. When flush, wipe on a very thin coat of glue and sand immediately. Doing the latter seems to stick a very thin layer on non-glue saturated sawdust that will finish very close to the unblemished wood.
4. Anything that will set up; that includes things like plaster of Paris, drywall compound, etc. You can add color before applying or after.
5. A Dutchman: route out the imperfection, glue in a new piece of wood to fit.
Any of these should work OK with an oil finish.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is this a "natural defect" or man made damage? If a natural defect such as a bark inclusion or split perhaps celebrating the defect by filling with a very dark brown, even black, tinted epoxy would be the way to go. It would end up looking like a smooth bark inclusion under the finish. Many of the high end turners and flat boarders I know use this technique to "fix" splits, loose knots, etc. and it looks quite natural.
If a man made defect, such as a ragged dent or scratch, I'd try steaming it several times to see if the damage raises and then reassess the situation. It may revive enough that another round of sanding the entire surface removes the defect. I wouldn't spot sand as it could leave a depression...
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John ...
Thanks for the reply. It is a rather modest natural defect. I think it add s a bit of interest to the piece, but my customer -- my son -- believes it is an imperfection that needs correction. I'm going to try to educate him on the vagaries of wood and the inherent beauty therein. This is hard rock maple, not laminate for heaven's sake!
Larry
On Friday, March 1, 2013 8:30:14 AM UTC-6, John Grossbohlin wrote:


ut


her

as

a

d

e

it

.

.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Gramp's shop" wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 1 Mar 2013 11:25:58 -0800 (PST), "Gramp's shop"

bit of interest to the piece, but my customer -- my son -- believes it is an imperfection that needs correction. I'm going to try to educate him on the vagaries of wood and the inherent beauty therein. This is hard rock maple, not laminate for heaven's sake!

Hey, Larry! See if you can show him how to do some inlay (wood, stone, or colored epoxy) which would make it a point of interest instead, if you can't convince him otherwise.
--
When a quiet man is moved to passion, it seems the very earth will shake.
-- Stephanie Barron
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.