Fast Firewood

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What kind of poplar? The western one that's related to aspen, or yellow-poplar AKA tulip poplar AKA tulip-tree?
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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wrote:

dampers
yellow-poplar
Wet.
That plus the damper is enough to assure incomplete combustion.
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wrote:

dampers
yellow-poplar
Yellow poplar Virgle
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Well, I think you might've been burning something else... I've burned an awful lot of yellow poplar in my fireplace, and have _never_ seen even a hint of creosote from it.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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awful
It was yellow poplar and dry. I have a 24' X 48' metal shed for storage. I started this winter with 17 cords of wood due to a storm taking down the trees. I had one chimney fire due to this. My problem was burning it too low at night. If you burn it hot there is no problem. I burn it during the day now and use good hard wood at night. I burn anything that grows in the woods. It all puts out heat just some better than others.
Virgle
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wrote:

Since you are a wooddorker, you must make sawdust.
"Pressed sawdust firelogs. These are made from tightly compressed 100% pure wood sawdust, without the addition of waxes, chemicals or other additives. Pound for pound, these give even more heat than natural firewood 8500 BTU per pound in comparison with 6400 BTU for natural wood. They can be used in fireplaces, woodstoves, inserts, and campfires. All in all, these firelogs give all the heat and more of natural wood, and have the convenience of popular wax firelogs."
http://www.worldwise.com/firorfir.html
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 (webpage)
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Not wood, but have you considered a corn stove? There are corn-burning stoves that produce good heat similar to the pellet stoves. Corn produces 7000 BTU/lb. Since corn weighs 56 lbs per bushel, a good midwest yield of 200 bushel (conservative) per acre would yield 78.6 million BTU per acre each year from the shelled corn. You could also harvest the cobs and stalks for additional fuel (realizing that somewhere you are going to have to put some of those nutrients back into the soil). A sophisticated operation could utilize a dual system, with one burning the kernels, the other, if you could locate the equipment to pelletize the stalks could burn the straw as pellets.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ The absence of accidents does not mean the presence of safety Army General Richard Cody +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Do what I do:
My fireplace burns quite nicely on skid wood.
I make regular pickups of skids from local merchants who are glad to be rid of them. Every now and then, you even find some wood good enough to use in the shop. Most of it is softwood, but hardwood isnt' uncommon. It's free and it's a replaceable supply - you just have to spend 20 minutes with a cordless circ saw out in the garage cutting it up.
PS - all my workshop "errors" end up in the fireplace too!
Brian

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I've burnt pallet wood before. If they are the common softwood pallets, it is hardly worth the effort to cut them up. The wood burns up in no time. Hardwood pallets are much better, but the wood is sometimes better off in the woodshop.
Brian elfert
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B Man responds:

And most trucking companies will be delighted to let you pick up used pallets and take them home. Just ask at the dispatch office. They have to pay to have the stuff hauled away.
Charlie Self "I think we agree, the past is over." George W. Bush
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I think that all depends on where you look. In the Housotn area our company used to get 15 to 25 pallets weekly. We sold them for $2 each and they had to come and get them ALL with no culling throug for the good ones.

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Charlie Self wrote:

Not anymore. These days, most outfits sell them back to companies that buy and/or make pallets so they can be re-used. Wood doesn't grow on trees you know. It's a valuable commodity that can't just be tossed in the landfill anymore.
(And wood *doesn't* grow *on* trees. :)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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SteveW wrote:

Does
Black locust grows fast and is reputed to burn quite hot.
--

FF


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Yes, but the wood has very high silica content and will dull a saw chain quickly. Just a nuisance.
Steve

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Steven and Gail Peterson wrote:

chain
quality
me.
If you cut it when its green it cuts pretty easy--most woods do. Locust gets pretty hard as it cures.
--

FF


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Actually, silica content of black locust is zero PvR

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wrote

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Maybe a tree hugger got to your tree before you decided to cut it and drove some nails in. ;~)
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drove
Trees with durable wood are able to last through an injury rather than rotting, often overgrowing the entire insult. Unfortunately, dust, dirt and other things get in there in the interim.
The Dutchman aside, the same probably pertains to the mesquite mentioned earlier. I know it does to cedar up here.
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SteveW wrote:

I'd start here. The National Arbor Day Foundation has been experimenting with stands of fuel wood that they use for heating. Their stands are sheared off, and re-grow new tops within 6-7 years, but they are chipping them rather than sectioning and splitting them I think. Not a lot of detail here, but it's a place to start:
http://www.arborday.org/programs/farmtour/tourdetails/12.html
I'm sure they'd be happy to provide more information if you asked.
(Or not. They never respond to any of my email, and I'm a contributing member, dammit. Oh well.)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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