ExtensionCordGauge

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I did google, but I'm still confused.
My table saw draws 15 amps. I have been using a 100 ft 16 gauge extension cord to run her, but I found out recently that this is to wimpy a cord. My manual recommends a 12 gauge extension cord not exceeding 50 feet.
My question is if I go to 100 feet of extension cord, is 12 gauge still ok? I guess do to the voltage drop with the longer cord that I may need a 10 gauge cord?
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I would keep a close eye on the heat generated with a cord that long in any gauge.

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"stoutman" writes:

NO ! ! !
As it is, you have a disaster waiting to happen.
I have a 100 ft power cord for my saw, it's 10 ga; however, it is also wired for 240V service.
If you ever try to rip 8/4 white oak, you will understand why.
For your application, if you decide to use 12 ga anyway, at least operate at 240V.
HTH
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
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Mostly good stuff here, but 8 is not necessary. The advice to go to 240V is good. Why not staple a piece of Romex to the ceiling and be done with it. Portable cordage is very expensive!
12 will do fine at 120V, unless you are running max load or more. At 240V, 12 is more than enough. Wilson

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No ceiling to staple to. I'm running power to a workshop in the backyard. If I owned this place (I rent) I would run some conduit and permanent power out there. This is a temporary situation.

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stoutman wrote:

I don't know enough about electricity to know if this idea is any good, but I've wondered about building an extension cord that uses two identical sets of conductors. The male end could be two plugs. The female ends would connect to the proper locations on a standard dual outlet. Would this work?
-- Mark
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Mark Jerde wrote:

And duh, use only one of the two outlets on the female end.
-- Mark
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On Sat, 13 Dec 2003 02:36:09 GMT, "Mark Jerde"

not sure what you're trying to do here, but it won't work ; ^ )
if you're trying to make 220V it won't work because the two receptacles on the standard dual outlet are just connected together inside the wall. to get 220 you need to get power from both left and right sides of the meter panel
if you're trying to get more amps from the standard dual outlet it won't work because again the dual receptacle is coming from one circuit.
if you're trying to beat the voltage drop of your light weight cord it theoretically would work. don't do it... better, cheaper and less chance for dumb accidents to just go out and buy yourself a commercial extension cord. if you need more than 50 feet but less than 100 get a set of ends while you're at it and cut the extra off and make a short heavy cord with a gang box on the female end. they come in handy.     Bridger
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Run an overhead line. Then dismantle and take the wire with you when you leave.
stoutman wrote:

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How about 50 feet of 12 gauge at 110 V ?

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My original calulations would be valid for 50ft.. I see Mark Hopkins link agrees. Very handy calculater by the way.
John, in Minnesota

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100 foot cord! You need a power cart with GPS to go from the workbench to the saw! :)
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You don't need GPS, you just follow the bright orange cord! :)

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stoutman writes:

Mine's bright yellow.
Charlie Self
"In the final choice a soldier's pack is not so heavy as a prisoner's chains." Dwight D. Eisenhower
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On 13 Dec 2003 01:03:05 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) scribbled

I use bright yellow for 220 cords, other colours (colors, Keith) for 110.
Luigi Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address
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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

But are these rated for use outside the house (house with a long "O" Luigi)?
UA100
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16 ga is 0.4016 ohms per 100 ft. = 6.024 volt drop at 15 amps
12 ga is 0.1588 ohms per 100 ft = 2.38 volt drop at 15 amps
I'd say 12 ga is fine.
John, in Minnesota
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Dang, screwed up that one. You must figure 200ft because the 2 wires. I knew that. Yup, 12 is definitely out. 10 is on the edge. 8 would be the safest way to go, especially figuring the voltage drop to where you're plugging it into. Sorry for the mis-info.
John, in Minnesota
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John, you're doing DC calculations. You can't use simple ohm's law for AC calculations.
wrotg:

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gauge says 15a is okay, you are fine. Since we don't know what the insulation is made of, we can't really say.
That is just what is safe. Whether it is reasonable is a whole other story. Unless the outlet is right next to the panel, 15a is a lot to put through a 100' extension cord; don't do it unless you have to as it is probably not good for your motor. Somebody pointed out the voltage drop was not too bad, but he ignored the voltage drop to the outlet.
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