Equpment Drive belts. A tip, something to keep in mind.

A sample of what I am speaking of.
http://www.rockler.com/1-2-power-twist-plus-link-v-belt
Also sold at harbor freight, Woodcraft, WWGraingers and many other places.
Graingers has a nice explanation of the belts, if it were to break just replace a link of two.
Adjust belt after one hour of normal work loads to compensate for normal belt stretch.
Ok. Why the post
Belts eat up horsepower, consume electricity when too tight and can cause premature motor failure. They also can and do add to vibrations noise, etc.
Too large a belt, for instance a "B" belt on "A" pulleys add a lot of stress due to its rigidity and strength properties. Use one in a pinch if need be but replace it quickly. Belts eat up motor pulleys and if your motor pulley has a groove on it that your fingernail can sense then the pulley is worn and now eating up your belts faster.
For energies sake never over tighten your belt. Check the using with an amp meter after installing a belt to be sure it won't destroy your motor by over amping.
Always use belts with "teeth" when you have a small diameter motor pulley. It will reduce operating costs and extend your belt life and pulley life as well. It is far easier for those to wrap around the pulley when starting and then when running.
Now, here is the reason for the post. The belt shown in the link will operate better than a belt with "teeth", run smoother because it is designed to wrap around pulleys. It is smoother, less vibration, less costs to operate and just plain easier on your equipment.
I tested it out on my band saw which was having problems throwing out a key on the motor pulley. It was due to two things, one the belt had no teeth, and it was a pot metal pulley. A cast iron pulley was many times the cost of this and I had replaced the stupid pot metal pulley with a like pulley at least 1/6th the cost of a decent pulley. I then bought a belt from HF and made the adjustments when installing, and WOW, what a difference in noise and vibration. It does even better on table saws in reducing noise and vibration. It isn't the cheapest thing out there but it does do what they say.
Nice thing is, one length can be saved for the longest belt you need, and then shortened at any time to use on something else. So it reduces shop costs overall, although :) belts are the least of our worries.
BTW, these same belts can be used on your air filtration system if they use belts and you will notice a reduction in vibration noise.
Grainger and maybe some drive belt/bearing house has good stock in all widths needed.
Just wanted to share a tip and hopefully return the favor you guys do in sharing your idea's.
I worked in HVAC and am retired, and know the importance of belts and maintenance on equipment, if that adds any weight to the post.
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On 5/20/2014 12:26 AM, OFWW wrote:

You might also want to consider this belt from HF. Very reasonably priced and I have one on my relatively new DP. One belt was enough to replace both belts in the DP. I was very surprised that this particular belt was also a well know brand belt manufacturer. The packaging indicated the manufacturer.
http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=link+belt
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-------- Original Message -------- Subject: Re: Equpment Drive belts. A tip, something to keep in mind. Date: Tue, 20 May 2014 08:22:15 -0500
Newsgroups: rec.woodworking
On 5/20/2014 12:26 AM, OFWW wrote:

You might also want to consider this belt from HF. Very reasonably priced and I have one on my relatively new DP. One belt was enough to replace both belts in the DP. I was very surprised that this particular belt was also a well know brand belt manufacturer. The packaging indicated the manufacturer.
http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=link+belt
Been using link belts for a few years. It solved a bad belt situation on my DP ... But I went back to regular belts for the dp as the width was not allowing me to get to a couple of speeds where the belt would be next to each other. But all my machines now have link belts. It made a huge difference.
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On 5/20/2014 9:11 AM, woodchucker wrote:

I noticed right away that there seems to be more noise from the link belts, they are quite stiff, but the vibration and noise caused by vibration is down 95%
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In the CNC forums a number of guys have noted reduced vibration with link belts on benchtop mills. It doesn't cure the inherently poorly balanced motors and pulleys, but its noticeable. I run a link belts on my benchtop lathe, and they are very nice. I don't have it over tight, and I'll stall the motor or spin the stock before the belt will slip.
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