Entrance way Arch

My wife wants an arched entrance to the front of the house -- and of course I just say OK.
The arch will cover a span of about 72" and will be about 18" in height. Okay no problem.
My question is --> Since this is an outside project and subjectto heart and humidity extremes I am wondering about material to use. I thought about glueing up cedar but that doesn't hold well -- at least from my experience. Then thought maybe some glued up white oak might do the trick but I would need to go find some -- the guy I normallly buy from is about 400miles from here so not close enough for a weekend project. Any thoughts about using exterior grade ply? I always dread using ply where it is exposed to the weather. If I cover the ply with a urethane will this help prevent decay?
Any ideas. Dummy simply says ok and now I need to figure it out. duh.
Thanks. Thom
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Thom wrote:

So, is this going to be a hole cut in the side of the house and with a door? Same thing at the end of a porch? Maybe at the front of a porch with no door? ________________

A lot depends on answer to questions above. ________________

Not to mention how it looks. You aren't covering with siding or stucco? ________________

No. Using pressure treated plywood would. So would using non-PT and a liberal application of Cuprinol. ________________

Around here, most houses are block. Arches are formed with 2 pieces of exterior ply cut with a curve. One inside, other outside. Short pieces of 2x4 are nailed between the two to form the bottom of the arch and firm up the ply. Windows/door frames are fastened to the pieces of 2x4. Ply and any 2x4 part that shows are stuccoed over.
--

dadiOH
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Good questions -- not enought info to work with it sounds like. The porch is about 6 foot wide and 4 foot deep so that it creates a little place to stand out of the rain beofre going in the door. The arch istself would hang from the front part of the porch -- the entrance would havet the arch at a 7 foot height then go 4 foot and then finally in the door. Mifey poo has a greenish color trim she want to use. The new arch would be painted this greenish color to match the rest of the trim. So no siding or stucko or bricking. Just paint. The arch will be about 3 inches in depth total to give it a little perspective when looking at it from relatively close. From the street no one can tell how thick this is. I anticipate using layers with a spacing (1.5inch) to create a sandwich effect.
Hope this helps with the needed info.
Thnask again. Thom

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Is it under a roof covering? Direct rain/snow/etc.?
I like the sound of the white oak, but, being from California, am not certain why a good Western Red Cedar would have a problem.
Where are you?
Patriarch
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It's under a roof covering but still the rain and snow can get to it. I'm from near St. Louis so we see all 4 seasons. I've never had good luck when joining cedar...I thought about it since it has inherient properties for the weather and is also light in weight compared to oak.
Thom

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Thom wrote:

Yep.
Occasionally, in this very group, people have mentioned a sheet goods material that is used to make outdoor signs. IIRC, is has a smooth, bonded material (phenolic?) on the to be painted side. I'd seriously consider using it, don't recall the name. If you don't mind the rustic surface, T-111 could be used too.
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dadiOH wrote:
| Occasionally, in this very group, people have mentioned a sheet | goods material that is used to make outdoor signs. IIRC, is has a | smooth, bonded material (phenolic?) on the to be painted side. I'd | seriously consider using it, don't recall the name. If you don't | mind the rustic surface, T-111 could be used too.
You're on the ball! I think you're talking about MDO or HDO - and although I've used the stuff, it didn't even occur to me that it would be about perfect for this application. With the edges sealed it should last a _very_ long time.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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