Engraving letters in wood bench - how to?

Ok, I have been Googling for some time without success so here I am.
I have a pine bench on which I want to engrave a 2" by 6" backrest board with some lettering. I can print out exactly what I want in Corel Draw and then transfer the outline to the board but where do I go from there?
The complete text will consist of letters 4.5" high that combine to be approximately 6' in length. I could just take my router and go for it but there must be several tips that would make the learning curve must less steep. Any help of any kind would be greatly appreciated.....any certain font? what bit(s) to use? anything that might help. Heck, even if this is something that I should not try, please tell me.
Also, if there is one or more URLs out there that would provide some help please point me to them.
Don
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You might consider carving the wood with the appropriate chisels. Serife fonts work very well with a V-shaped chisel. And the process might leave some desirable marks / traces if you're looking for a bit of a retro look.
As for the router approach, obviously a V-shaped bit that will alow you to go into corners. Best fitted on a Dremel tool for that size of lettering, if you own one that also has this sort of attachement: http://www.dremel.com/en-us/attachments-and-accessories/attachment-accessory-detail.htm?H8575&Gi679&Ii795 Then a flat-head bit to clear larger surfaces, if needed (endmill or something similar).
Oh, and you might want to make a shallow cut along the edges with a sharp knife first, regardless of the process you choose.
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There are a couple of ways to go with this. You could cut the letters with chisels and gouges, but I bet you want to use power tools. There are letter stencils and frames to use with a router (something like: http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyidS97 )
. You could also do this with a "V" bit or veiner, (or other appropriate bit) and cut freehand. Sears/Craftsman also made a router duplicating pantograph. I had one set up on my bench at one time (sorry, but the box and manual are in garage no-man's land - ie; lost). This allows one to enlarge/reduce from original artwork. You could probably make one of these:http://www.dust-n-shavings.com/pantograph/pantograph.htm
Lastly, there are simple, fixed router mechanisms such as the duplicarver or similar: http://www.terrco.com/index.php?page_name=sign_carving

board

there?
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Thu, Jun 28, 2007, 11:10pm (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@crsales.com (IGot2P) doth burble: <snip> I want to engrave a 2" by 6" backrest board with some lettering. <snip> I could just take my router and go for it but there must be several tips that would make the learning curve must less steep. <snip>
Gods above. Do it like every school kid and drunk has snce time began. Whip out a pocket knife and carve. It ain't rocket science; it's a practice curve, not a learning curve.
If you think you still need help, go to a library, get a carving book, it'll have pictures in it even, and if it's about marine carving, probably even in color. Plenty of instructions on-line too.
JOAT If a man does his best, what else is there? - General George S. Patton
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Hand cut them. Cheap Stanley butt chisels reground to a skew angle should work great.
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send it to me and I will carve it on my cnc (G) anyway you go practice on something else first.
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