Electrolysis + bronze concern.

Hi,
I have picked up an old Delta Jointer. I have disassembled it and have started removing the rust via electrolysis. So far so good. I found out that part of the body must have been damaged because their is a bronze weld.
Can I remove the rust from this piece via electrolysis or will the process damage the bronze?
Thanks
Alex
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If the piece your derusting is anodic or connected to the positive lead in the process, you run the risk of deplating the bronze area. The material loss will probably be very slight, just keep an eye on the bronze area as your processing the part.
Ed Angell

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On 24 Jun 2004 06:06:53 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@rbc.com (acolic) wrote:

Yes. Use the usual CATHODIC derusting process, with the piece connected to the negative (usually black) supply. You might see a little green discolouration at the surface of the bath, but there's nothing to worry about.
Anodic cleaning (connected to the red / positive) works better on bronze than it does on steel. However this is an electro-polishing process and it works by removing metal. Bath times are very short, and you need to monitor progress continuously. Anodic cleaning would eventually dissolve the whole workpiece, steel and bronze together.
--
Smert' spamionam

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On 24 Jun 2004 06:06:53 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@rbc.com (acolic) wrote:

Alex,
Another message in the thread mentioned connecting the positive (anode) lead to your work piece. My advice is DON"T EVEN THINK ABOUT IT!!!! It is a fast way to ruin the part. (Note, I did NOT claim that was what the other message recommended, only that it was mentioned.) I'm still looking for a Stanley 113 frog and handle to replace one that I totally ruined when in a moment of thoughtlessness I reversed the connections in a derusting session and left it overnight.
Always use the workpiece as the cathode (negative/black lead) and the sacrificial chunk of iron/steel as the anode (positive/red lead). Maybe that's why it's called sacrificial. 'Cause the anode will be consumed, eaten away, rusted out, destroyed, ruined, or otherwise devastated.
That being said, I have derusted items with brass/bronze components (as the CATHODE) without adverse effects.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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