Ducts for dust collector?

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I am running my Jet straight out of a 15 amp receptical. The load is not too hogh when using it and the spindle, disk, router, or drill press. When using the Drum sander the sander is plugged into a seperate 20 amp circuit. The Saws and planer are 220.

Absolutely, ;~) Rockler only had 10' lengths on sale.

Rockler
As yo can see form the pics I posted, the clear hose is pretty supple.

3 posted at a.b.p.w.

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Leon,

My JDC DC says it takes 16 Amps, probably more starting up. I currently have it on a 20 amp circuit that runs down one side of my garage. For now I can plug my tools into the 20 amp circuit running down the other side of the garage, but I'll probably put in a dedicated outlet for the DC once I know for sure where I'm going to keep it. It will be real easy if I place it near my breaker panel where I'm thinking.

Makes sense, though with the cost of the connector and clamps, did you really come out ahead?

Have you had any problems with them coming disconnected from your tools? I've read some reviews on various quick disconnects, and it sounds like they have a nasty habit of not staying hooked up.
The port on my Grizzly bandsaw would concern me the most, as it's cast into the metal of the machine.

Yep, looks like it. I'll probably have to order some clear hose.

Thanks for the pics! I appreciate it.
By the way, my DC has a "Wye" fitting on it with two 4" dust ports. Have you tried using both ports at the same time (without closing off the other hose)? I tend to go back and forth between my planer and tablesaw a lot, so it would be nice to hook up two hoses and avoid the swapping if possible. Probably not possible with a 1-1/2 HP DC eh?
I'm thinking of picking up one of those tablesaw dust hoods to mount under my cheapie Craftsman tablesaw. But if it works the way I think it does, I thought I might attach a short "stub" of hose and a connector to make it a bit easier to attach and remove the hose (rather than reaching up under the saw).
Anthony
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The hoses were normally $20 each, I got both for $10 each and the 2 clamps and connector was about $3. I was about $17 ahead.

The connectors on my saws are steel the planer and sander are plastic. None of them are tapered or if they are I have never noticed. There is no problem having the hose stay on except some times the nose will come off of the sander if I open the sander up with the hose connected. A goo tight push is all it really takes. Remember that the hose naturally has a tendency to stay on as there is a vacuum inside. I do not recall a hose ever coming off when in use.

Mine also has the 2 "Y". No I have never used 2 at once, one satys plugged.

Something is better than nothing but I am not sure any TS captures it all. I always have a small pile inside and under my cabinet saw but the DC gets 90% and I do not have to scoop the saw dust out of the TS any more, thank goodness. The TS still will throw dust up on top and especially if the blade is exposed on a cut where you are removing less than 1/8" on a rip.
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Leon,

Good to know, thanks. Maybe I'll order some and give them a try.

Well, right now I get a spray of dust about 4-5 feet behind the saw, all over the top, and a significant pile that builds up under the saw and the cart I use as an outfeed table. Just keeping the pile off the floor would be nice, anything more would just be a bonus...
Like I said, I haven't even hooked the DC to a tool yet. I've only sucked up some dust around my saw and turned it on to watch the dust swirl around inside the bag! :) That's worth $300 all by itself! :) I'm putting the finish on some cabinets right now, so I can't kick up dust for a few days.
Anthony
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On Wed, 28 Nov 2007 21:09:48 -0600, HerHusband wrote:

Search the group archives. Lots of people, myself included, use PVC without any problems.
I have a 2hp Jet canister dust collector. I ran 6-inch S&D for horizontal runs across the ceiling, and down to the DC, with a short length of flexible line to make the connection to the DC inlet. I used "Y" fittings in a couple of places where an elbow would have been OK, as an access for cleanout. I closed the access opening with a screw-in cap fitting. I haven't had to use them yet. All vertical drops are 4-inch S&D, with metal (cast aluminum) blast gates to make the transisiton to flexible line to the machines. All 90-degree bends are done with two 45-degree elbows to keep the bend radius as large as possible. I purchased the S&D pipe and most of the fittings and hangers at a local plumbing supply. I found additional fittings at Lowe's.
My TS and router table are the farthest from the DC. I recently added a drop to connect an over-blade collector on my TS (Shark Guard). I also have a BS and jointer connected, and a radial saw using a hood built from plywood. I added a short vertical drop with a blast gate and bayonet quick-disconnect in an open area of my shop where I connect my portable planer or drum sander when I'm using those tools.
I think my system works pretty well.

Read the info on Bill Pentz's website about duct sizing.
--
Art Greenberg
artg at eclipse dot net
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go here.. use 6" ducting.. it all makes sense..
http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/index.cfm
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From the bill pentz site, I adopted thin-wall pvc, sewer & drain, and use very short runs.. and then using a 2 foot or so chunk of 6" clear flex from the vendor Bill suggests.
His site is top notch.
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Anthony, Last year I installed a complete cyclone dust collector and duct work. I used Penn State Industries to design the duct work for me. The spiral ducting is a little more expensive but when I first turned on this system, I was totally amazed. I love it and continue to be impressed on how it has changed my woodworking patterns.
Roger

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I used the duct work at home depot. They have two grades, and I used the thicker one. Works fine, never collapsed or even came close.
You can see pics here
http://www.areddy.net/wood/workshop.html
For the Ys, I broke out some special CAD software I bought and created templates that I used to cut out the appropriate shaped pieces from ductwork and taped them together. I offered selling those templates on Ebay for a while, but no bites. If you're interested, let me know. The templates were basically the cost of 1 consumer Y fitting, and you can obviously make as many as you want.
IMO, the expensive stuff is WAAAYY overkill for the home woodworker.
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