Drywall ceiling

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It doesnt matter if the ceiling is to be smooth or textured the first two coats still have to be smooth, clean, and sanded. Many people think that texture will "hide" poorly, sloppy, taping but it wont. You will still see every joint through the texture especially in low angle lighting. Though we dont use them this is especially true with rolled (thin) textures.
Prep textured and smooth ceilings identically. Only difference is the final coat.
Mark
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On Fri, 14 Mar 2008 18:00:04 -0400, "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote:>I'm adding dry to my ceiling that is plaster and lathe.
Does the weight of the lathe make the ceiling sag?
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At that one spot I think it does, it looks and feel solid. The spot is about 3/4 lower than all the others.

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"noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote in message

Remove the old plaster first, then the lath, trust me it is easier then ripping it all down! Run strapping across the exposed joists every 16 inches. Shim as needed to get them as level as reasonable. I say reasonable because with old houses you sometimes have to just accept the fact that it not possible get things level and true. Greg
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On Fri, 14 Mar 2008 22:48:41 GMT, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

LOL :-)
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On Mar 14, 6:00 pm, "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote:

The question is why is your ceiling drooping. Is it because the plaster has separated from the lath, the joists have sagged, or there's another problem. The one joist at 24" is a red flag. Before you go adding substantially more weight to your ceiling, you should investigate fully and find out what's the root cause of the problem.
Here's how to install ceiling strapping, aka furring: http://tinyurl.com/3dch5t
As others have said, removing the old ceiling is generally preferable.
R
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That one spot that is sagging feels pretty solid when I push up on it. In the dining room when I took off the square tiles, there was plaster missing. This house was built in the 40's. I could take off the plaster and lath but would have to find a wait to get the 4 x 12's up by myself w/o renting the drywall lift.
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noreaster wrote:

Rent the drywall lift, get a helper and install all the sheetrock in a single day. I recently put up a complete ceiling inside a 32 foot by 48 foot building with inside pitch of 2" in 12" (scissor trusses on 24" centers, 4x8 foot sheetrock with long edge at right angles to the trusses. With one helper, it all went up in under 8 hours, including breaks, lunch and a six pack or so of beers each along the way, so the afternoon went slower than the morning, as you might expect... I don't do this sort of thing for a living, so am definitely NOT as fast as the pros. This ceiling started at 10' high at the low edge with peak at about 12' 8". We laid the peak first and worked down to the lowest edge.
After previously done the short stilts thing, and the short scaffold thing even on an 8 foot high flat ceiling, I wouldn't even think about putting up ANY overhead sheet goods without a sheetrock lift. They rent pretty cheap, are easy to use, and if you have one long enough, you could do the whole job by yourself and not be beating yourself to death doing it. After remembering four of us (late high school and college age) holding up sheets of 1/2" sheetrock and nailing them to the ceiling joists way back in the 70's, finishing out a garage, there had to be a better way. The lift is the obvious tool for the job. The hardest part of the whole process is loading the sheetrock on the lift, and after that all you do is flip it up flat, crank it up to the ceiling, and position it. Once in position, a little more crank on the lift to press it against the joists and you've got it in place while you screw in sheetrock screws at a liesurely pace. No bent and strained back trying to hold up one part while screwing or nailing as far as you can reach so the sheet doesn't fall down before you can get more fasteners in place... No bitching at the brothers holding up the other corners when you find out they couldn't hold the sheet on line so now you have to trim the next one.... and so on. I wish such equipment existed in the 70's, it would have made things a lot easier in the family, if you know what I mean... Today, in my 50's, any money I can spend to rent machines that save my back and make life easier is money well spent, particularly when I sit still long enough to remember the "old days" of my youth...
Others are right, you need to pull down the old plaster and lath, for two reasons. First, to determine and correct (if possible) the reaon for the current "sag", and second, to reduce the load on the ceiling that you'd have if you added the sheetrock. Given the older construction, I'd not want the added weight of the sheetrock in place, and besides, it would be nearly impossible to ensure the fasteners went into the joists instead of just the lath, which would make for problems down the road. I wouldn't be too concerned about the one place with a 24" joist spacing, if the truss structure looks appropriate. (Current trusses are 24" or 48" spacing, depending on design "snow load" and such. If the joists are actually part of engineered trusses you shouldn't have any problems. Even if they aren't, if the span isn't that great (say 12 feet), you may still not have any issues. If in doubt, have a qualified building engineer take a look and determine if the load is appropriate for the joist spacing and bracing. Even a couple hundred dollars would be well spent knowing things are up to current code.
Good luck, take every opportunity to let the machines do the work for you. Any time you can get a machine to lift, position and hold something like sheetrock in place while you take care of fastening it in a lesurely manner, the money you spent on the tool rental was cheap cheap cheap, particularly if you factor in the emergency room or doctor visit for the strained back from trying to hold up one end of a sheet while you reach out and drive screws, not to mention the days of pain or aches you endure during recovery from the strain. Yep, tools are our friends, in many ways...
--Rick --Rick
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noreaster wrote:

When you've determined for sure that subsequent work won't be necessary on the joists, I'd recommend that you put up 4x8 sheets, if you're doing it alone. With two T-braces, I've successfully installed 4x8 sheets, but I cringe at the thought of 12 footers.
Ok, "success" is a relative term. I did lose one sheet in a 17x20 room. I also didn't have the t-braces that i should have had. 12 sheets are a good idea for the pros, for people with the lifts, and for people not working alone. For the rest of us, 8 feet seems the maximum
Tanus
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noreaster wrote:

Make a couple "deadman" supports of the proper height to lift/hold the in place. A "deadman" is just a "T" made out of a couple of 2" x 4"'s. With the help of my wife and the deadmans we were able to put up 16's by ourselves.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Tear it out. Shim/furr it. Go rent a lift. They break down into pieces so you can fit it into a small car if you have to. For around $40 a day it will make the job much easier. I recently installed 12 sheets of 4'x12' 5/8'' on a vaulted ceiling by my lonesome. The hardest part was getting them onto the lift. Absolutely no way I could have done it without the lift.
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Let me chime in and second the idea of removing the old lath. I did it here on a ceiling and it was much better than furring on top of the existing plaster. If you need to level the ceiling joists, you can sister new ones onto the existing ones. "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote in message

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