Drills - question for metalurigst?

I'm familiar with drill bits for wood, for metal and for masonry. Question is, drilling in Ceramic/porcelain requires a special tip. It looks like the same tip for masonry. Is it? If not, what is the difference. Technical replies are most welcomed.... Max [a chemist]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The little dodad on the end is more pointey
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm not 100% sure, but I would guess diamond impregnated metal tip running with very low thrust and lots of coolant. Same basic procedure as glass. You aren't really drilling as much as wearing away a round hole.
Search google for "drilling holes in glass" or something similar.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. http://www.autodrill.com http://www.multi-spindle-heads.com
V8013
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thu, Nov 18, 2004, 1:31pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (JMWEBER987) says: The little dodad on the end is more pointey
You really should have dumbed down your response more, not all the people here will know what technical terms like those mean.
JOAT Measure twice, cut once, swear repeatedly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I thought about it, but didn't want to insult anyones intelligence. Mike in Arkansas
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 18 Nov 2004 05:07:48 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Max63) wrote:

No.
Masonry is brittle on a small scale, but not on a big scale. So we don't usually _drill_ it, we chisel through it with a hammer drill. If you look at the edges of a masonry drill bit, they're blunt and have no edges at all.
If you try to hammer-drill glass or ceramics, they'll crack. So you need to use a rotating chisel edge, as we do for wood or metal. Because they're hard materials though, we use the same tungsten carbide inserts as the masonry bits, but they're not ground the same.
Most drilled glass or cermaic is in thin sheets, so there's not much dust or swarf to get rid of. They don't need the spiral flutes to clear the muck. The simplest drill bit is thus a "leaf" bit, a simple oval of carbide, brazed onto a narrow shaft and sharpened with a sharp edge. These are cheap, not too hard to find, and the best way to drill most glassware.
Drill ceramics wet with oil. Make a circular dam around the hole, using glazier's putty (which is made of oil, so it's oil-resistant - Blu-tack will loosen and fall off). Put a shallow puddle of oil inside this dam - almost anything will do. Then drill slowly and with light pressure, "dabbing" the drill up and down to let the dust out. Be _very_ careful when the hold breaks through to the far side.
You really need a drill press to do this. Hand-drilling it will have a lot of breakages.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(Max63) wrote:

i drill glass sinks. 1" to 1.5" thick. diamond core drills are fastest, although loose carbide and a piece of copper pipe works too. use lots of water.
a tripod drill with a center water feed tap is best. these are NOT cheap.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Charles Spitzer wrote:

Or an ultrasonic mill/drill http://www.sonicmill.com / Got what I'm told is the only one in the UK at work...
Niel.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

those look way cool, and a probably more than a few orders magnitude more expensive than a tripod drill.
i suppose a water jet could cut these too, but those are probably out of the price range of a normal user. i use my sandblaster for thin (<.25") glass myself.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks to all! Got the pic. Off to work.... Max
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
i work in a hobby shop where we do ceramics. the bit i found that worked best has a flat, slightly curved bit that comes to a point. no cooling fluid is necessary to use it and it lasts for years. it's fairly cheap. we mostly use it when someone forgets to drill the hole in a lamp base before firing the lamp in the kiln. i'm no metallurgist, sorry...but i believe you can find those bits at most hardware stores. rich

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.