Dremel/HB

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HB sent me a coupon through email for a Dremel-like tool for $15.99 (half-price). It comes with 1/8" and 3/32" collets (I know at least one Dremel tool has 1/8" collets) so I expect that a lot of different tool-bits would be available. Although I do not have a specific use in mind at the moment, it seems like it might come in handy for smoothing sharp edges and "unanticipated" tasks like that.
What's the verdict: (1) useless, or redundant (could just use a file), (2) good value, (3) insist on Dremel?
Bill
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IMO, at under $20 (incl. tax), it's worth it to see if you need the tool. If you fabricate small parts, you'll probably find it is worth it. Keep in mind, no tool will do the work for you but it's possible that with a little finesse, many jobs can be made easier.
I have a bunch of them, Craftsman, Ryobi, and Dremel, and attachments (drill press, router base, etc.). For lots of tasks, they are indispensible.
Ed
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Thanks Ed, I sort of feel that way too. I''ll be surprised if I can go a whole year and not find a use for it! -Bill

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You probably already figured out that I abbreviate Harbor Freight as HB. I've done it before and I can't explain why. Probably should be HF.

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Thanks for clearing that up, Bill, here I thought you were talking about Home Bepot. . . :-)
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use every 5 to 7 years.
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wrote:

I cut threaded rod more often than that. ;-) I burned up two of them (and fifteen of the carbide bits :-() removing grout from the bathroom walls in the last house. I wish there were an HF in town. $20 beats $75, twice.
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While I was purchasing it, I was questioning the cashier about a drywall repair I am making, and he said "hey, you can even use this cutter (on the rotary tool)" to make a nice clean cut! So, the rotary tool got it's first assignment before I even left the store!
Bill
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Bill wrote:

That's what the Rotozip _does_. The regular Dremel is a bit underpowered for it--that's why they used to make a "Dremel Advantage" tool that got discontinued when Bosch bought out Rotozip. Still, for very occasional use a Dremel with a Rotozip bit will do the job--just take your time.
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On Fri, 27 Nov 2009 17:39:17 -0500, "J. Clarke"

...or take your drywall (keyhole with large teeth) saw and get it done in seconds. ;0)
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Yeah. I bought a Rotozip a couple of years ago and after having to clean the dust from an entire room (instead of directly under the cut) after making a few cuts in drywall, I put it back on the shelf.
Thanks for reminding me, I need to sell that POS.
djb
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Dave Balderstone wrote:

When equipped with the trammel jig they do work nice for cutting round holes for recessed light fixtures.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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That was actually the other item I brought to the register with me--but I decided not to get it! When I described what I wanted to do, at first he suggested a hacksaw blade, and then he mentioned the rotary tool.
Bill
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Charlie Groh wrote:

That works fine if you're cutting a piece of drywall on a bench. If there's an electrical box or studs behind it you'll find that the Rotozip or Dremel is a much more satisfactory tool.
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It all kind of boils down to "right tool for the right job". A dremel isn't going to rip an 8' piece of plywood but OTOH your circular saw isn't going to shape an intricate piece of maple inlay for that mahogany table you just made.
Ed
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I find a knife is more satisfactory. YMMV.
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On Fri, 27 Nov 2009 19:37:16 -0500, "J. Clarke"

I never cut drywall on a bench (patches, I bend down and do 'em on the spot), sheets are usually leaning on the surface to be covered...dunno, been doing drywall repair as an adjunct to my carpenter/cabinet one-man biz for 20 years...and have hung entire jobs. Tried all the new things and *always* come back to the saw and knife. Cleaner and in most cases quicker (to make the rotozip work you need a helper...and don't nick the wiring or the electrician gets pissed)...marking and registering are the bugbears for most, but after awhile...
cg
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Charlie Groh wrote:

Why do you need a helper to make a rotozip work? I've never had a helper and it works fine for me.
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On Fri, 27 Nov 2009 23:09:46 -0500, "J. Clarke"

...and nicking wires? Why does the business edge of the bit come anywhere close to the wires?
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...OK, the way it works on commercial work is you stand the sheet where it goes (registered by a couple of scraps on the floor) and the outlet box is located pretty much by eyeball,push the sheet tight to the wall, plunge the bit in and, if your're good, it's just to the outside of the box, and run the thing around. This is a close to perfect cut and does require two guys for true speed and accuracy...it can be done alone but certain circumstances of box positioning makes it hard. Nowadays I eyeball down to the box and scribe the verticals then measure the horizontals and cut the hole with my pocket saw. Not intending on giving you guys a hard time, 'cause I realize that there are as many ways of doing things as there are people on the planet, I just gave up on the Rotozip thing years and years ago...
cg
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