Drawer Dividers

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Anybody know what a good wood for drawers dividers is?
I am looking for that white stuff that appears to be quite stable, must come in about 1/8" thickness. I thought about Baltic Birch but prefer not to have the stripes on the top edge for this.
TIA
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You'll need to make this yourself. What machines do you have?
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Make what myself? I was asking what the wood was not how to make them....LOL
I have produced a couple of dozen furniture projects over the last 45 years, framed and finished my house (almost) and many decks and built many computer and electronic projects.
wrote:

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Hard maple makes good dividers and is light in color.
John
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Thanx.
I wondered about maple but I have had a lot of warping with maple in the past. Perhaps in thinner material for dividers it would suit.
The other problem is finding a supply of 3/8 - 1/2" stock.

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On 1/8/11 9:43 PM, Josepi wrote:

The only time I see solid stock that thin is in craft stores in the balsa wood bins. The guy makes furniture and surely has a bandsaw and/or planer to re-saw and surface.
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-MIKE-

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On 1/8/11 10:38 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Wait a sec. You're *the guy,* right? Ok never mind.
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-MIKE-

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I picked up some 1/8 red oak stock the other day in home depot. I didn't have any red oak , and needed a small amount, and decided it would do.
On 1/8/2011 11:38 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

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On 1/9/11 3:46 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

You reminded me.... I have seen that bin as well.
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-MIKE- wrote the following:

Better yet. In the craft stores they have bins of Basswood in various thicknesses. Harder than balsa. I used to make dollhouse furniture from it when my girls were young.

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Speaking as a Cheap Bastard (tm) I have made many drawer cases and dividers from stock that was cannabalized from old dressers and other furniture left at the curb on bulk trash pickup day. I'm not above pulling the drawers out and leaving the carcase on the curb, then cutting the sides, bottom, & back out for my stockpile when I get home. Many old pieces used oak or oak strip glueups for the drawer sides and backs.
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Sounds like the scrounge may be more lucrative for these types of items.
Speaking as a Cheap Bastard (tm) I have made many drawer cases and dividers from stock that was cannabalized from old dressers and other furniture left at the curb on bulk trash pickup day. I'm not above pulling the drawers out and leaving the carcase on the curb, then cutting the sides, bottom, & back out for my stockpile when I get home. Many old pieces used oak or oak strip glueups for the drawer sides and backs.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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I use poplar and I rip it down from 3/4" stock so you end up with quartersawn dividers. Easy on the tools and hardly ever have any that bow. If I need dividers shorter than 3/4" then I usually rip them down after the fact but nothing stopping you from planing the stock down first if you need to. If I needed something taller then I would use 8/4 poplar.
-Kevin
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Thanx. I just think that 3/4 would be a little thicker (in looks) than I wanted for cutlery dividers and other drawer things. Sometimes it's just a matter of getting used to the thickness and then it looks normal again...LOL
I wondered about hobby shops for building kits. I know they use balsa and one other wood that is fairly strong. Sealed it may do the job...expensive probably.
wrote: Thanx.
I wondered about maple but I have had a lot of warping with maple in the past. Perhaps in thinner material for dividers it would suit.
The other problem is finding a supply of 3/8 - 1/2" stock.
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I guess I wasn't clear, I rip it 1/8" thick for jewelry box dividers so they are 3/4" tall and 1/8" thick. If you use 8/4 stock you can get 1-3/4" tall by however thick you want. If that is still not tall enough, then you can get thin stock from wall lumber (or make it yourself).
http://walllumber.com/thin.asp
-Kevin
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I can see myself buying a table saw one of these days. I know too many lost an eye and other parts with them so I have avoided it and the room space is a factor.
Sounds like a tall rip for such a small piece. Thanx for the clarification.
wrote: Thanx. I just think that 3/4 would be a little thicker (in looks) than I wanted for cutlery dividers and other drawer things. Sometimes it's just a matter of getting used to the thickness and then it looks normal again...LOL
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How are you building all this stuff for 45 years and don't own or are reluctant to use a tablesaw? Are you real good with a bandsaw or circular saw? My tablesaw is pretty much the machine that 90% of all my stock goes thru if it doesn't go thru anything else. ~If~ you had a tablesaw, you could make this stock in mere moments.
RP
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I make use of my circular saw in some weird ways.
Since I do not have a thickness planer I typically get my boards pre-planed. In the last few years I have lost easy access to good hardwood suppliers though.
For long ripping I typically end up taping two pieces together and then clamping both down under a fence piece. With about 2" of show I can rip off what I want and a half an inch under the fence piece clamped.
I hav done some weird stuff with router tables too, including creating some arrows that shouldn't have flown across the room...LOL
How are you building all this stuff for 45 years and don't own or are reluctant to use a tablesaw? Are you real good with a bandsaw or circular saw? My tablesaw is pretty much the machine that 90% of all my stock goes thru if it doesn't go thru anything else. ~If~ you had a tablesaw, you could make this stock in mere moments.
RP
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On Sun, 09 Jan 2011 11:35:32 -0500, Josepi wrote:

No, no. The proper tool for resaw is the bandsaw. Get some 8/4 maple or poplar or birch. You can resaw it to 5/16" or 3/8" and plane or thickness sand to 1/4". Or resaw to 3/16" or 1/4" to get 1/8".
If you don't have the tools needed, buy thin lumber on line. I did a quick Google and found several places. Among them:
http://www.kencraftstore.com/woods/soft_maple.htm
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Larry Blanchard wrote:

There is also Advantage Lumber & Trim in Buffalo, NY:
http://www.advantagelumber.com/thinwood.htm
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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