Domestic exotics

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I was going to suggest black locust, but figured you had already considered it. It's not really exotic, but pretty rarely used as boards. There is at least one company down in North Carolina that mills black locust into flooring. From what I know of locust wood that should be some long lasting flooring. I'm thinking about using it when I tear up the carpet and put in hardwood in my family room.
When I was heating with wood 20 years ago I learned that green locust was easy to cut with a chainsaw, but almost impossible to split. Well cured it was just the opposite, you could split it fairly easily, but it would dull a chainsaw trying to cut it. It burns nice when it's good and dry, terrible when it's green.
Bill Ranck Blacksburg, Va.
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Charlie Self wrote:

Honey Locust grows all over the place in Missouri (the state where I grew up). It loves the low-lying meadows and creek bottoms, down where the oaks start to thin out. I doubt that you'd find any of it being cut at the local mills though; you'd almost have to find someone who could go out and fetch some for you and have it milled.
Chinaberry is very common down here in Austin, but I don't know anybody who deals in it.
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I haven't seen these on the list... Box elder burl or 1/4 sawn black locust.

osage
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On 02 Dec 2003 18:38:59 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

Ash, Swamp ** Fraxinus spp. Aspen ** Populus spp. Butternut ** Juglans Cinerea Hackberry ** Celtis occidentalis Lime** Tilia americana Pecan ** Carya illinoensis Sap Gum ** Liquidambar styraciflua Sugarberry ** Celtis laevigata Willow ** Salix nigra Carpinus caroliniana American hornbeam Avicennia germinans black mangrove Rhamnus betulifolia birchleaf buckthorn Conocarpus erectus Combretaceae Buttonwood Catalpa bignonioides Giant Chinkapin Kentucky Coffeetree Arbutus arizonica Arizona madrone Mountain Laurel Amelanchier arborea Allegheny serviceberry Silverbell Sourwood Sumac Tanoak Tree-of-Heaven Tupelo Witch Hazel Yellow Buckeye
Regards, Tom Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania 19428 http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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Isn't one of the lacewood species native to the US?
Besides that, and the others already mentioned, I'd add camphor and live oak. There are native mahogany trees and cuban mahoganies in South Florida. There are a number of woods that are quite stunning when spalted including maple, camphor and magnolia. I also like ambrosia maple, which can often be gotten significantly cheaper than plain maple.
David
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Tom Watson wrote: complete and total snippage of the "lesser used" woods...
I'll add mulberry to that list if I may. Trouble is it starts out real nice looking but darkens a wee too much over time.
UA100
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Tom Watson wrote:

Sumac???
I find it hard to believe you can make anything out of that stuff. Dries like a sunflower stalk; all pith, and no wood.
I let one grow because I think sumac trees look sort of cool.
It grew 12' in the first year, then it sprouted suckers.
Now I'm trying to kill about 60 sumac weeds, and they won't die, no matter how many miles of roots I dig up.
If Charlie wants some of this shit, I can hook him up.
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Charlie:
It took you to get me out of lurk mode. I vote for sassafras. Great wood to work with, pretty grain and color, and when you do work with it you're in a cloud of that sassafras smell. Very enjoyable stuff.
Cheers.
Mario
Charlie Self wrote:

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Olive. Carolina cherry. Pepper
-JBB

osage
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On 02 Dec 2003 18:38:59 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

isn't that a contradiction of terms?     Bridger
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snipped-for-privacy@cox.net wrote:

Sounds like a maid that doubles as a stripper.
Dick
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Charlie Self wrote:

Oleander. I hear it's beautiful. Toxic as hell though.
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Charlie Self wrote:

Smokewood Pieces are small, greenish yellow with brown stripes. I've only had one piece big enough to make a pen. Bigger pieces may exist, I've never seen the tree (bush?) I've got two pieces left that might make an unmatched pen. Wish I could find more!
ARM
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Madrone anyone?
Charles

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Charles Peavey notes:

Probably should have been on my original list.
Charlie Self
"I have as much authority as the Pope, I just don't have as many people who believe it." George Carlin
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I've been hoarding some wormy chestnut for a special project, but try to find some live trees. I would also include Ash, Tiger Maple, Hickory, Elm.
Dave

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote in

Mr. Self, What can be more exotic than the beautiful maple in the northern part of the United States or the southern part of Canada. Birds eye, fiddle back, tiger etc. Beauty is truly in the eyes of the beholder. Hank

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