Do you work wood in a "shop" or a "studio"?

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wrote:

Yeah, like this new term "metrosexual" for guys that pay too much attention to how they look. When I was a kid, they were called "pansies".
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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You saw that episode of South Park too??? And yup, pansies. My dad still calls 'em fruits.
--
"Cartoons don't have any deep meaning.
They're just stupid drawings that give you a cheap laugh."
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Nope, don't watch much TV. No cable. Never saw any episode of South Park.

I remember hearing that growing up, too, but from classmates, not from Dad.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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On Fri, 16 Jan 2004 15:22:29 +0000, Bay Area Dave wrote:

Hmmm... "shop" is virile "studio" is gay?
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C wrote:

Shed $10 Shop $100 Studio $1000 I think we've had this discussion before. Joe
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I think you are right that often the choice of a word for a workplace is based on the perceived or desired value of what is produced.
While it is true that strictly speaking a "studio" is a place where a painter, sculptor or photographer works, the word is in fact used by others.
Google gives about 97,000 (97 thousand) hits for the exact expression "woodworking studio". Some of the references are to woodworking schools that call themselves "studios", some are to workshops used by very serious and (I suppose) esthetically advanced woodworkers and some are just workshops that can be rented or shared with others.
The question is where to draw the line between the "fine arts" and the "useful arts". Generally the fine arts so not involve creations designed to fulfill some utilitarian function. However, there is certainly artistry involved in designing and building furniture and there is a level of work where a unique design and its realization in wood is more than mere craftsmanship (which while noble and praiseworthy is usually derivative and not highly creative in the way a painting or scupture is.
Basically, those who say "woodworking studio" are emphasizing the fine arts aspect of their work either because such woodworkers are artists or because they want customers and critics to think they are, thus increasing the value of their work.
As for those who have suggested in various ways that "woodworking shop" is the manly, viril, macho word and "ww studio" the gay, pansy, fruity word, well hey boys, when you get a little older and a bit more mature maybe you'll put aside such childish musings.
--
Regards,

Benoit Evans
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A studio, to me, connotes a place where creativity is as much a part of the production as mastery of that production itself with the CAVEAT that we're talking about a place that's Earned the right to be called a studio--like when you see the woodwork and feel the wind being sucked out of your lungs with a "Damn,...." pulling it along.
Webster's defines Studio as: The working room of an artist. In this case, I think `studio' is being used instead of shop because he produces both art and furniture and his furniture is a work of art.
The reality is that IF any of us discussing this built furniture as well as Heitzman does, we could call our place of production whatever we want and charge whatever we want 'cause the market is there for it. I'd love to be that good!
By the way, mine's a shop ;-}
Cheers, Gary
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On 17 Jan 2004 07:01:47 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gator.net (Gary Greenberg) wrote:

having lived in too many "studio" apartments and now having a house that is bigger than I really need and a building to work in that is bigger than any of those "studio" apartments, I call that building in the back yard a shop. it has nothing to do with needing to assert my masculinity. heh, my masculinity asserts itself : ^ )     Bridger
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I'll admit to having (fake Spanish) pretensions of grandeur.
Thus, the place where I construct sawdust is named:
Canta Forda WoodWorking Studio
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Robert Bonomi wrote:

I can't afford one either.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com says...

The difference is in your product. If what you produce is classified as "Art" then you have a studio. If you produce "Functional" pieces, then you have a shop. Dunno what you have if your art is functional! :-) Confused?
SWMBO is into pottery, and on occasion I help her with a project. In reading some of the literature from that field I see the same distinction, although less prevalent. If you make functional ware then you have a "Pottery", but the art producers have a Studio.
Ohhhhh!
CharlesJ -- =======================================================================Charles Jones | Works at HP, | email: snipped-for-privacy@hp.com Hewlett-Packard | doesn't speak | ICQ: 29610755 Loveland, Colorado | for HP | AIM: LovelandCharles USA | |Jabber: snipped-for-privacy@jabber.hp.com
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figures, you are a ceramicist.     j4 (builder of fine hi-fire kilns and whose ex was both)
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Then I guess you could call our two Malamutes 'Artists' and the back drive their 'Studio' because they certainly produce some 'artful pieces' !!
Regards, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop {and if you think I'm kidding . . . I'll give you odds, that if I 'spray' them with epoxy, let it fully cure, and make up some 'spiel' . . . SOMEBODY *WILL* buy it . . . e-bay or otherwise !! - Remember the 'Pet Rock' ? Or 'Plastic Dog Shit Hide-a-Key' ?}
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Charles Jones wrote:

Don't you mean the difference is in the type of work you do?
I'm smoking product with my left hand and drinking product from a product with my right. I'm using product to produce this product. I just flushed product using rolled product to wipe product.
God, I hate that word.
/rant
Mark, who has never made a product, everything's had a name.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
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REM_TO snipped-for-privacy@neo.rr.com says...

At first, I read this then shrugged off the rant and passed on. Then, as I thought about it more I realized that I disagree with the assertion that "type of work" and "product" are equivalent.
In my opinion, of course, "type of work" is a more general term. It addresses all that I do, whether for commercial gain or for personal enjoyment. "Product" speaks more specifically to the physical things that I produce for sale. This distinction was firmly in mind when I wrote the sentence quoted above and its snipped companions.
Besides, I see your "Product" and I will raise you a "Going forward" :-)

Jeez, the only word I have ever hated is "Tax" ...
CharlesJ -- =======================================================================Charles Jones | Works at HP, | email: snipped-for-privacy@hp.com Hewlett-Packard | doesn't speak | ICQ: 29610755 Loveland, Colorado | for HP | AIM: LovelandCharles USA | |Jabber: snipped-for-privacy@jabber.hp.com
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Charles Jones wrote:

The only word I hate is "eunuch."
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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On Tue, 20 Jan 2004 17:30:48 -0500, Silvan

Not the word, but the way she says it "No."
--== May The Angst Be With You! ==-- -Yoda, on a bad day -- http://diversify.com Ending Your Web Page Angst.
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Does the US have a distinction between "Arts" and "Crafts" ?
In the UK, this is a huge separation. Crafts people laugh at artists and their frivolity, artists won't even let us in the building, let alone the gallery opening. There's a shared studio space in town that I'd _love_ to be working in, but as a "craft" furniture maker, the "artists" there just won't rent to craftspeople. If this is a rather arbitrary call for someone who welds sculptural steel furniture, it's downright ridiculous for the glassworkers.
"Artists" in the UK in recent years have been feted and paid huge prices for what is by and large self-centred crap (Emin, I mean you). Crafts people OTOH are those who "work with their hands" and are thus considered stupid. Hangovers from a rustic past, but there are no more sheep for us to herd in Wessex, and we're too stupid to become car mechanics.
I have a workshed, BTW.
-- Do whales have krillfiles ?
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Andy Dingley wrote:

That's a very interesting question, and hard to answer. We have Artists of the sort that you have, but we also have "Crafts" people who are much like them, hence Artsy-Crafty. We have craftsmen, fewer every year, and turners, and cabinetmakers also declining in numbers as professionals but increasing as hobbyists. Some of the latter show up in "Craft Fairs/Shows" routinely and in some places share spaces with the hobbyist artists. I'm not sure, at all, that its the same all over the US. In many ways the East and Left coasts are different countries and neither is like the Midwest. Local feelings may welll be different. At least that's my viewpoint. Yup, shop, and plans, not patterns or studio. Dave in Fairfax
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reply-to doesn't work
use:
daveldr at att dot net
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Dave, "East & Left", as opposed to "Right & West"?
snipped-for-privacy@fairfax.com wrote:
ists. I'm not sure, at all, that its the same all over the US. In

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