display case question

I am thinking of making a display case for my daughter's spoon collection. My concern is the outgassing dammaging the spoons.
1) What wood that is workable has the least natural acidity? 2) What glues to stay away from? 3) What finishes to stay away from?
My plan is to let the case "breath" for at least one month after construction. Thanks
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I want to make my daughter a display case for her spoons. Since the spoons are silver & Pewter & unknown pot metal, I want to select materials that will not attack the spoons.
1) Which wood has the least aklines that is reasonably available and workable 2) Which finishes cure in about one month without still having major out gassing issues? 3) Which finishes to stay away from?
While I can work with woods of most densities, Ipe / rosewood is about my limit.
Thanks
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goaway wrote:
> I want to make my daughter a display case for her spoons. Since the spoons > are silver & Pewter & unknown pot metal, I want to select materials that > will not attack the spoons.
Ever wonder why silver chests are lined?
Lew
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I would chose a nonacidic wood such as pine, popular or maple and a white glue for this type of project. test with litmus paper before final selection. Yellow glue might be fine I don't know. For the finish maybe a acrilic plastic would be best but I would go with polly or even a wax or lacquer finish. What ever you do the spoons are going to tarnish. JMO

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http://archive.amol.org.au/recollections /
Avoid wool around sulphur (sulphur from it encourages tarnish). If you're going to felt-line it, don't use a wool felt.
Close fabric contact can be a moisture trap, especially in some climates.
Both softwood and hardwoods can be harmful. Resins and tannins are both to be strongly avoided. Birch, beech and lime are good inner case materials.
Avoid solvents, especially those that out-gas from paints and glues over a long period. Admittedly this is less of a risk for metals.
Foam core board is your friend for making lots of quick little display wedges.
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Hi goaway:
Silver chests use a special felt, called Pacific cloth, that nearly eliminates tarnishing of silver. You could use it to line your spoon display case, and it should have the same effect. I recently built a silver chest and used Pacific cloth. It's very easy to work with. I got mine here:
www.nancysilver.com
Regards, John.
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Another factoid:
My folks reworked an old wardrobe into a china closet, and displayed their sterling in it. It had large doors, with glass, and many internal shelves. On the shelf that they put the sterling on they lined back top and bottom with pacific cloth, and had very little tarnish problems. Over time, yes there was change, but it was over a fairly long time.
The pewter I've had, hasn't been affected by house atmosphere much, and never tarnished appreciably. Just kept it clean.
Pot metal??? No idea.
I read somewhere that display cases should not be made out of oak, because it causes an acidic atmosphere, but I wouldn't bet money that is true. Meaning, better check it out.
Do you have a museum or art gallery in the area? Those guys are in the business of preserving things, they might be able to help.
Old Guy

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