Dining room table & chairs

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krw" wrote:

They gave my mother a chance to practice her German when she talked to them.
Would buy eggs and fresh garden vegetables from them.
In that area you have both the Amish and the "Beardless Amish", AKA: Mennonites.
Sometimes the only way to tell the difference from a distance was that the Mennonites drove automobiles.
Lew
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On Wed, 23 Dec 2009 21:13:04 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

That's one of the interesting things about the Amish. They're not against technology, rather luxuries. They'll gladly use technology in business (I posted the web site of the company I bought from) but will not have the same in their house. The company I bought from was not connected to the power grid but did have diesel generators to run the business. ...and cash registers, calculators... OTOH, some had gas lighting in their showrooms instead of generators. They, of course, used trucks to deliver their product, though it wasn't theirs. I don't know, but suspect the people hired to do their deliveries weren't Amish. Maybe they were Mennonites. ;-)
We did see Amish in the Chapel Hill Mall in Akron, driven there in large passenger vans. The do use automobiles, though I have no idea what the ownership details were.
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krw" wrote:

They are allowed to use internal combustion engines for stationary power but not personal motive power or electrical systems in their homes.
My dad used to sell them oil and grease for their engines back in the late 40s and early 50s.
Back then, they used belt power for thrashing machines.
Quite common for the Amish to pay for a "Ride to town" to go shopping.
Several would share the cost by riding together.
If you ever got to Millersburg, the county seat for Holmes County, you got to see something totally unique.
Parking meters in front of the hitching posts on the town square.
Don't think you will find that any place else in the country.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Saw an interesting ad on Yesterday's Tractors several years ago. An Amish farm selling a relatively modern White diesel tractor. It had been equipped with steel wheels instead of rubber tires. My understanding that allowed level of technology is dependent upon the local church leadership.
--

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Mark & Juanita wrote:

And there appears to be no way to tell except by being in the particular group what is/isn't "in".
We've lots of communities thruout KS; the variability between them within only 20-30 miles can be quite sizable. Particularly recently in the SW there has been a large influx of German-speaking Mexican and other SA nationals w/ a wholly different set of prohibitions and allowed practices it appears. These are mostly Mennonite in the large picture afaiu.
BTW, one "threshes" grain, not "thrash" for whichever/wherever I noticed that (and whatever it's worth :) ). Oh, and there are other places in US w/ hitching posts/and meters, too... :)
I saw an overall population map somewhere on the web--after the areas one would think of PA/OH/etc. that are much more heavily populated, KS was generally from 3rd-5th in various sects--they arrived very heavily in the mid-/late-19th century.
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wrote:

Funny, our "kitchen" (breakfast, actually) chairs are padded and the formal dining room chairs not. The dining room is nice stuff where we want to show the wood (cherry) and the kitchen stiff is cheap stuff we've had for years (will be replaced this spring with a Bistro-height table and chairs). I haven't decided what wood I want yet.

Our dining chairs are "Royal Mission" style so have a pretty drastic curve in the back. They fit the back very well and quite comfortable.
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Thanx, Sonny - I used sandpaper to slightly round the sharp edges about 1/8 so it should be fine. Also, I did number each seat.
Vic
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I recovered 6 dining room chairs long ago. I didn't have the fabric stretcher, but still got pretty decent, uniform, tension all around. To get it, I placed the fabric face down on the bench, adding the already padded seat on top, then adding 2 60# weights to the wood. The weights compressed the padding very well, and all I had to do was gently pull the fabric over the wood base and hit it with the stapler. My weights were fairly large, so to get a little elbow room for the stapler, I stood them off slightly with a piece of 6X6 I used as a wheel chock on the truck.
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that makes a lot of sense. I know I was applying uneven pressure each time I pulled the fabric. A good properly placed weight would have made it much easier.
Sometimes the obvious escapes us. :)
Vic
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fabricated the tenons somehow and then rounded the edges. Correct?
Dick
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On Sat, 19 Dec 2009 21:08:31 -0500, "Dick Snyder"

Indeed it does. I've been considering how I want to tackle M&T and this solution looks pretty good. It's certainly cheaper than the Leigh jig ($850!).

They sell the tenon stock on the same web page.
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Yes. they do sell various sizes pemade but it was a snap making them. I just cut some strips on the bandsaw and a few passes with a block plane to round over the edges. Probably could use a router to round the edges but it was really only a few passes with the plane. BTW, also used the MortisePal to rout the dowel holes in th ends of several pieces. Made alignment a snap. As you can tell, I REALLY like that jig - and I have no connection with the company other than a satisfied customer.
Vic
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