Dewalt DW106 chuck removal

I'm trying to replace the chuck on my Dewalt DW106 corded drill. The instructions with the tool say to chuck an allen wrench into the chuck and hit it with a hammer in the counter-clockwise direction. There does not appear to be any sort of screw inside the chuck as is often mentioned (e.g. in the large volume of previous posts to this group about removing chucks). I have whacked the thing a couple dozen times with a hammer and tried using WD-40 to maybe loosen things up, but I have not made any progress. It hasn't loosened at all. What else can I try?
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snipped-for-privacy@cam.cornell.edu wrote:

Use a single-purpose penetrating oil (Liquid Wrench or similar); WD-40 is good, but is formulated for dozens of other uses. Clean off any visible deposits from the shaft back of the chuck before you apply the oil there. Some chucks have a hole so a drop inside the chuck will hit the attachment threads, so do that, too.
I'd use a rawhide hammer, or maybe a light wood stick; rapid blow from a light hammer is called for (and there's no need to bash a good allen wrench against a steel face here).
If it's still stuck, a few seconds application of flame from a propane torch to the chuck can be useful. You don't want it red hot, just boiling.
When reassembling, I often put a wrap of the plumber-type teflon tape around the shaft; it won't need penetrating oil next year when you want it off again.
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Is this a reversible drill? If it can run in reverse, it has a screw inside holding the chuck. It is often an Allen headed screw.
Once the bolt is out or you know that there is not one, it is time to get the chuck off. The Allen wrench method works well. Get the largest possible Allen wrench. Tighten the small end of the L shaped Allen in the drill chuck. Look at the chuck end of the drill, not the handle end, to determine counterclockwise rotation. Get a steel headed hammer, piece of pipe, a hardwood stick, or something else that can deliver a hard, sharp blow. You need to swat the long end of the Allen very sharply to deliver a blow that tries to turn the chuck faster than the motor can turn. All you have holding against this blow is the motor as you can't hold the armature in a vise or lock the armature against rotation. Get mad at it, hit it hard, hit it several times. It will spin off, have total confidence. ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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It is a reversible drill, but I saw no sign of a screw nor did the drill's manual mention one. (The version with the keyed chuck apparently has a screw, but not the keyless chuck.)
I've spent another month whacking on it, and tried a liquid wrench type product. No progress. It does seem, however, that the shaft has gotten somewhat wobbly. (The chuck moves from side to side a bit. I don't believe it used to do that.) Can anybody recommend a good corded drill with a keyless chuck?
DanG wrote:

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Adrian,
I'm sorry for your trouble. I still stand firm - if the drill is reversible there IS a screw holding it. Where are you? perhaps a tradesman near you can help.
The best corded keyless I have ever owned is a Milwaukee. Hold the slip ring and tighten as much as you want. ___________________________ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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Well, I already looked for a screw several times. If I open the chuck up and look down with a flashlight I see a smooth metal surface at the bottom. No slot, no recess for philips or allen wrench. I can look again.
I'm in Northern Virginia. Which Milwaukee are you recommending? When I read the amazon reviews of drills with keyless chucks there's always people complaining that the chucks don't work, it seems, even for Milwaukee's low end drill.
Note that in my case I suspect that the failure of my chuck was really the result of abuse. The drill always worked fine until I remodeled the bathroom. Then I used the drill to a dozen holes in ceramic tile. Nothing would cut these tiles except diamonds. The diamond bit required continuous water lubrication and it took 5-10 minutes PER HOLE. The chuck rusted. It was light rust that was easy to remove with a rust remover, but it was after that job that I started noticing the chuck slipping.
DanG wrote:

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replying to adrian, Mark wrote:

I encountered this post when trying to find a way to remove the chuck from my ancient DW106 drill. Adrian is correct -- there is no screw in this model. I finally figured out that if I removed the seven Torx #10 screws holding the drill together, I could separate the case halves, lift out the gear, shaft and chuck, and lock a Visegrip onto the shaft between the chuck and the first gear. Locking a 1/4" Allen wrench in the chuck and turning the chuck counterclockwise with a few blows from a light hammer, using the Visegrip to keep the shaft from turning, did the trick. Reassembly was no problem at all. I wish I had done this to begin with and that I could have shared this trick with Adrian when he encountered this problem 9 years ago.
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On 10/4/2015 1:44 PM, Mark wrote:

Typically screws are only used for reversing drills. Anyway the standard procedure if it does not have a screw or after the screw has been removed is to tighten the chuck, if possible, on to the short end of a large hex wrench. Then whack the wrench with a hammer counter clockwise if the wrench is between you and the drill, and or in the same direction that the drill spins when drilling a hole. I realize this is basically what you said but normally you can do this with out taking the drill apart. The resistance of the motor and gearing is normally enough to hold the chuck in a relatively stationary position.
That said, I wonder if using an impact driver to loosen the chuck would work better.
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