Delta Contractors Saw - Can it do it . . . .


I am just starting in woodworking so I post a lot of questions, sorry if to many on too many topics . . . But I have never been so excited about learning to do anything as woodworking . . . .
My latest question is . . . . I really want to build a "REAL" workbench . . . . Problem, I bought a Delta X5 2HP Contractors Table Saw. I operate it on 220VAC. Is it capable of cutting 3 1/2" to 4" hardwood to make the slabs for making of the laminate top. After reading this page http://swigerwoodworks.com/my_workbench.htm , I realize my saw might not be capable of building one of these work benches. Anyone who has run hardwood of this thickness thru a 2HP saw, please le me know what blade you used or would suggest.
Thanks again . . . Steve
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The specs say that the maximum depth of cut with a 10" blade is 3 1/8". By cutting slowly and carefully and giving the blade time to remove the waste, I've cut wood thicker than that on my similarly sized saw by cutting through one side, flipping the wood over and then cutting the other side. Another alternative is cutting one side with the table saw, then cutting the piece off with a hand saw and then flattening that part with a block plane.
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On Sat, 6 Aug 2005 19:53:15 -0500, "Steve DeMars"

depth of sut of that machine should be right about at 3". you can double that by flipping the board over and running it through again. if a full depth cut bogs down the motor switch to a blade with less teeth, feed slower and / or make the cut in several passes raising the blade between passes.
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Version 3. Your saw will do it, You can cut as deep as the saw will comfortably cut then flip the board same side against the fence and cut again. Raise the blade some more and repeated the above procedure. Raise the blade repeat. You get the idea.
No need to get a bigger saw or shy away for an occasional project that requires this type cutting.
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Why do you need to make cuts that thick? The thickest dimension in the workbench you referenced is 2 1/2". I certainly would not want to attempt to cut anything thicker than that on any table saw if the wood was rough. Before you get too far into doing the top yourself, check the prices of pre-fab hard maple tops. You might be surprised how little extra cost it is compared to the large amount of work you would spend milling, cutting and gluing it up yourself.
Bob
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I built a European woodworkers bench with a saw similar to yours - Jet 10" contractor saw. The top on your bench doesn't need to be more than 2 1/2" thick, which your saw can handle if you take it slow and raise the blade progressively and make multiple passes. I used a Woodworker II blade. Used beech for the bench top.
Probably more important is how you will surface those boards so they glue up nice and tight. You'll need a thickness planer to cut everything down to exactly the same width and thickness (run the boards through wide side up; then gang them and runt through on the edge).
Bob

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Approx 3.5in is the MAX depth of cut on your saw.
Of course, you can do the cut in 2 passes, one on each side to handle thicker material
John
On Sat, 6 Aug 2005 19:53:15 -0500, "Steve DeMars"

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A saw with more HP would be able to cut quicker without bogging but any contractor's saw with 1.5 hp or more can cut hardwood with some tlc. I guess you realize that any 10 inch tablesaw has a max cut of 3 to 3 1/4 inches or so? If you are ripping 4" thick wood you will need to flip it end for end to finish the cut. Read up on safety precautions for using this technique. Using a good quality 24 tooth or even 18 tooth ripping blade will make the operation much easier on you and the saw, but with proper care it can be done with a GP blade.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Steve,
Your question does not make sense. Why would you need that big of a cut?

All 10" saws have a depth of cut capacity of 3" (give or take)
From the picture, I'll assume that each lamination is about 2" thick and 5 inches high. You would not use a table saw to cut the 5" dimension. You would either start with planks which are two inches thick and rip them to 5" wide cutting through the 2" dimmension.
Ideally, you would start with 8/4 ot 10/4 rough-cut planks joint then plane them to thickness make your slabs for lamination. This is prefereable as you can guarantee that your laminations are dead-flat (that's really important).
Does that help of confuse?
-Steve
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