Deglossing a Waterlox finish: how long until fully cured?

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I have finished applying six rag-wiped coats of Waterlox Original Medium Sheen to the new, unfinished white oak table (24 hours drying time between coats, light 320-grit sanding, vacuuming and tack cloth also between each coat). Current plans are to go over the table with a white Scotch-Brite to degloss the finish, and I've read that it is best to wait until the finish is fully cured.
Requesting net-wisdom estimates for how long I need/should wait to do the deglossing.
The last coat was put on four days ago; after drying/curing in the 60-degree basement for four days, the various table pieces are now upstairs where the air is 70 degrees with 50% humidity.
Re: using white Scotch-Brite to do the deglossing -- any suggestions for a better method also appreciated.
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good luck deglossing a medium sheen with the white pads! I just used a white one on semi gloss and it turned out every so slightly glossier, not that I minded. Some folks are big on waiting ages to touch a new surface with anything. I did mine the next day, but I wouldn't want to put liquids and a power buffer to it for quite a while to be sure. I rubbed gently.
dave
Ladd Morse wrote:

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Are you suggesting that white Scotch-Brite is too fine a "grit" and that I should use a coarser one?
I've got some gray pads ...

Always my intention, regardless of what I'm rubbing. :-)
Ladd
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Ladd,
TRY the white one for a few moments and see what it does; the gray one might give you a less glossy surface than a medium sheen finish. All mfg's products don't dry to the same sheen, even with the same general descriptions like "semi-gloss" or "satin". All you can do is try first what you think will work, and if the results don't match your expectation, switch pads. It won't hurt to spend a few minutes using the white one. You'll know pretty quickly if the sheen is going flatter.
dave
Ladd Morse wrote:

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Which is why (pick Supreme Being of choice) invented "undersides". :-)
Thanks for the advice!
Still looking forward to hearing from other folks also.
Ladd
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There is NO grit in the white pads. They are for polishing. Tales of a Boatbuilder Apprentice http://pages.sbcglobal.net/djf3rd /
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Dave Fleming <> wrote:

Yes, there is no grit in the Scotch-Brite pads. Hence my putting the word in quotes, because it was the easiest way to distinguish the varous roughnesses of the differing pads.
I would be happy to use the official and possibly less confusing terminology when I know what it is.
Regards, Ladd
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Dave Fleming <> wrote:

An interesting read. Thanks for taking the time to publish the site! :-)
Ladd
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<snip of previous witty and erudite remarks>

<further snip>
LOL, JOAT I have just about all the Dave comments from 2001 and 2010. I din't download them. Folks just seem to send 'em to me.
Back to the topic of the thread. I have NO experience with hard type finishes. I leave advice on that to others who do. I was merely commenting on the 'grit' remark re: White Scotch Pads. Tales of a Boatbuilder Apprentice http://pages.sbcglobal.net/djf3rd /
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<sniperoo>

<further sniperoo> You got the Hard Drive space JOAT?
And to keep from futher intruding on the topic of the thread let's take it off group OK? Tales of a Boatbuilder Apprentice http://pages.sbcglobal.net/djf3rd /
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<snip> Oh ya mean THAT dave!!!!! Tales of a Boatbuilder Apprentice http://pages.sbcglobal.net/djf3rd /
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Glad you cleared that up. Maybe Mr. T can get some shut-eye tonight. After he goes to Walmart for some 'stinguishers, that is.
dave
Dave Fleming wrote:

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<snip> The other dave, sorry meant to put a smiley or two in that previous post.
PAX
Tales of a Boatbuilder Apprentice http://pages.sbcglobal.net/djf3rd /
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No problemo, Dave! :)
dave
Dave Fleming wrote:

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On Mon, 8 Dec 2003 10:22:40 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@his.com (Ladd Morse) brought forth from the murky depths:

Agreed.
I'd give it a week in the warmth and then degloss with Johnson's paste wax on the pad. Or I'd use a crappy lemon oil gunk after deglossing if I weren't going to wax. It will even out the sheen before it dissipates in a few months. I used that on my first kitchen cabinet doors (back before I found out why I would always again try to avoid poly) after deglossing. I oiled 'em 3 times a year after that.

I've used the extra-fine gray or worn-out maroon scotchbrite but not the white. How well does the white work on Waterlox? The white pads are much less abrasive.
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Received an email from the folks at Waterlox and they said I could expect the finish to be fully cured in 3-5 days. So your advice is pretty close. And either time frame is much quicker than I had expected.
As the table will be used in the kitchen, the protection purportedly offered by Waterlox was one of the major reasons for selecting that particular finish. Putting wax on top of this finish seems to be reducing the "little-to-no-care" and "protection from water and other common kitchen chemicals" aspects. If it turns out that the look presented by waxing the table is really what I wanted from the beginning and didn't know it, I'm guessing I should have gone with an oil finish to begin with.
Unless you were saying that the wax was to be used as part of the deglossing process AND removed afterward (using mineral spirits or whatever), in which case I am now more educated than I was before. :-)

I have both white and gray, so I'll give both a try on the underside of the table leaves and see what happens. Looking forward to your response regarding the waxing question above.
Regards,
Ladd
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On Tue, 9 Dec 2003 21:23:38 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@his.com (Ladd Morse) brought forth from the murky depths:

I like to wait a week, especially after a whole lot of coats. Finishes should NEVER be rushed, EVER.

Waterlox is just an oil finish with varnish in it for a buildable layer. It's great stuff.

I had forgotten that you wanted a kitchen table finish and yes, you can either forego the wax or remove it later. It might help ease the deglossing process.

Be sure to use them in the direction of the grain. You'll end up with a "brushed" finish. The wax would otherwise hide the against-grain or orbital scratch marks.
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Fortunately, that advice will be easy to follow. I'll be experimenting tomorrow morning with the underside of the table leaves -- the last coat went on them about three weeks ago as they were the very first thing I worked on. By the time I get through those undersides, then the undersides of the table, then the legs of the table, then back to the leaf tops, not only should I have a better idea of how this process is going to work, but the table top itself will have well over a week of warm, dry curing time. :-)

good to know, thanks.

I'm sufficiently new to this whole process that I have yet to learn of any case when it is good to go AGAINST the grain! :-)
My guess it would usually been at the start of construction when one wants to remove material quickly and plan on doing lots of with-the-grain sanding afterwards. Not applicable to my particular project (adding finish to a purchased, unfinished table), but I can imagine it being an integral part of many projects.
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On Tue, 9 Dec 2003 22:28:12 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@his.com (Ladd Morse) brought forth from the murky depths:

Wax on, wax off, Grasshoppah. Simple and straightforward.

Care should be used in removing the wax. Try some naphtha first. I believe it's safer on varnish. OTOH, you might try leaving it on and seeing how it wears. You might find it OK if you're not slobs at the table, leaving wet chunks of food on it for hours or days at a time. Married people seldom have that problem, but I've had roommates (eons ago) who wanted to live like that. ;)
Another alternative is a steel wool lube. I've heard about it but never used it. This article says Murphy's oil soap can work and that would keep you from having to use solvents on the fresh finish. http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/pages/w00133.asp Pumice and your white pads are shown, too.

Oil finishes are one of few exceptions to the rule for both application and buffing.

You're better off always working wood -with- the grain.
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An interesting article. And the link comparing the various roughnesses of steel wool, pads and sandpaper was quite helpful.
Thanks!
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