Dead EWP


Well, the old pine just north of the house is officially dead in the ground. It was dead last year, but I wanted to be sure I didn't have a dead-ringer on my hands.
I'd like to salvage a bit of wood from it and make <something> from it. Despite the sap, it afforded the best views when climbed, so I figure I'll make a rustic frame for a panoramic photo taken from the top.
My question is this - should I limb it and let it season in the ground a couple years before felling it? I've read about that being done with old hardwoods before. It'd make a great flagpole for a few years.
JP ************************************************* Nope, nada, no research whatsoever.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
i've tried to salvage standing dead eastern white pines before and found them rotten to the point where they don't even make decent kindling. at best, only the heartwood was still sound.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Could one drill a "core sample?"
Would that help determine the condition without impacting the yield significantly?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gooey TARBALLS wrote:

I'm just going to fell it and be done with it. Que sera sera.
JP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Trees want to be milled when they're green. After they dry out it gets harder (in more than one sense). I remember a 35 year old plank of 4" thick hickory that I had to re-saw for a client to make a mantle shelf. The bandsaw mill owner charged me for the blade after 1 cut. If you want to mill the wood, cut it down and mill it before it drys out.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip comment about the difficulty of re-sawing older wood>
Interesting! I have some 4" x 8" beams of beautiful quartersawn white oak that I salvaged during our remodel two years ago that I am intending to re-saw part of to make various furniture projects.
Any suggestions besides a really good re-saw blade? I have never actually re-sawn myself, but my neighbor has a nice 18" Laguna BS and I was going to buy my own re-saw blade for use when I use his saw.
TIA
D'ohBoy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Infeed and outfeed support/rollers.
JP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I don't know about where you live, but around here, the termites will do away with the roots within a year and the tree falls, sometimes with bad results. John in SC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"My question is this - should I limb it and let it season in the ground a couple years before felling it? I've read about that being done with old hardwoods before. It'd make a great flagpole for a few years. "
After just one weekend volunteering for the sawmill at a local steam thresheree and chatting with the folks who brought logs to get cut up for real cheap, I've come to the conclusion that fallen or standing logs don't actually "dry". They rot. Sometimes to the point where a healthy-looking log will be nothing but a cylinder of good wood surrounding a whole lot of dust and bugs. It looks like a year is the longest you can leave it, and then you're still taking a chance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.